The Best Of The Best U.S. Jobs Are Tech, Tech And Tech, Again

from USA Today Hey kids, want to grow up to land the best job in the country? Then keep poring over those math and science textbooks. Jobs that require a range of STEM skills (science, technology, engineering and math) claimed 14 spots in Glassdoor’s new “50 Best Jobs in America” survey, out Monday. This includes the top-seeded position: data scientist, a job in which you employ considerable math and computer programming skills to wrestle huge amounts of raw data into intelligible and useful data sets. That job took the crown with a leading Glassdoor score that reflected the number of openings for the position (currently 4,184), a top […]

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Business Is Likely To Reshape Higher Ed

from Brookings It’s broadly understood that a college degree or its equivalent is crucial to making it into the middle class in America. But getting those qualifications can be a risky process for many young Americans from a modest income background. Indeed, just 9 percent of young people from the lowest income quartile will ever earn a college degree. But even completing a degree does not necessarily mean a graduate will receive the skills they need to succeed in today’s workforce. That’s because of a profound disconnect between many college administrators and recruiters for business about what is needed. Just 11 percent of business leaders believe […]

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Please Don’t Panic If You Haven’t Found Your Life’s Purpose

from SHRP In today’s hyper-connected world, it’s easy to feel like you are falling behind. Whether it’s your career status, relationship status, or social status, it’s all too common to think people are farther ahead of you. This especially rings true when we think everyone else has found their purpose in life. There’s nothing worse than seeing a friend live out their life’s purpose and feeling a twinge of envy. What they fail to realize is that purpose does not find you, you find your purpose through action, hard work, and patience. In other words, the more you pour yourself into your projects […]

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The Relationship Between Student Debt And Earnings

from Brookings Student loan debt in the United States is now over $1.25 trillion, nearly three times as much as just a decade ago. The typical student graduating with a bachelor’s degree with debt (about 70 percent of all students) now owes between $30,000 and $40,000 for their education, about twice as much as a decade ago. Although taking on modest amounts of debt in order to pay for college is generally a good bet in the long run, colleges with similar admissions standards and resource levels leave students with different amounts of debt. More here.

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Congratulations! You’ve Been Fired

from NYTs AT HubSpot, the software company where I worked for almost two years, when you got fired, it was called “graduation.” We all would get a cheery email from the boss saying, “Team, just letting you know that X has graduated and we’re all excited to see how she uses her superpowers in her next big adventure.” One day this happened to a friend of mine. She was 35, had been with the company for four years, and was told without explanation by her 28-year-old manager that she had two weeks to get out. On her last day, that […]

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A Mystery of Our Time: The People Who Enjoy Commuting

from The Atlantic Commuting is a drag. Every minute spent getting to and from work has been shown to take away from time spent working out, cooking, and sleeping. When two economists polled 900 Texans in 2006 about their favorite activities, the morning commute ranked last. Longer commutes make people less healthy, worse at their jobs, and more likely to get divorced—and commutes are only getting longer. So what is the deal with the small number of people whom transportation researchers have found to be perfectly fine with their commutes, even—shockingly—enjoying them? This is a real thing: When researchers studied the preferences of 1,300 […]

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The New Dream Jobs

from NYTs When the National Society of High School Scholars asked 18,000 Americans, ages 15 to 29, to rank their ideal future employers, the results were curious. To nobody’s surprise, Google, Apple and Facebook appeared high on the list, but so did the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Security Agency. The Build-A-Bear Workshop was No. 50, just a few spots behind Lockheed Martin and JPMorgan Chase. (The New York Times came in at No. 16.) However scattershot, the survey offers a glimpse into the ambitions of the millennial generation, which already makes up more than […]

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Liberal Arts Degree to Software Industry

from Medium Last week I was at Whitman College talking to students in the newly created computer science department about careers in the tech industry. Many students were interested in knowing what they could do while still in school to better prepare themselves for joining the industry. Having watched a lot of interns and new graduates get started with their software engineering careers at facebook, here are my suggestions to anyone who is interested in hitting the ground running when they first join the industry. I’ll throw in some extra notes at the end for folks coming from a non-traditional engineering background?—?i.e. […]

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The Revolution That No One Talks About

from Medium The world is changing, and most of us aren’t adapting fast enough. When I was in school growing up, it was a given that everyone should go to college. Everyone around us?—?our parents, teachers, the media, etc?—?told us that it was pretty much a requirement. And the subtext was that anyone who didn’t go would be a total loser in life. And after college, we’re told to get a stable job. We’re told to be happy with whatever we can get. And we’re told to stick with it. But this is terrible advice. Don’t get me wrong. All […]

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How To Get A Job Of The Future With A Liberal Arts Degree

from Fast Company To hear policymakers and higher-education wonks tell it, there’s now a chasm separating what high-tech industries need in order to stay competitive and the skills current students can offer once they’re old enough to work for them. It’s called the STEM gap, shorthand for all the science, technology, engineering, and mathematical knowledge that not enough of the next generation of American workers are picking up. And not only is it widening, it’s opening fissures in non-STEM fields as well, as technology transforms industries that didn’t used to need data scientists or programmers but now do. In the face of that […]

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Defining ‘Employee’ in the Gig Economy

from NYTs There is a long history of businesses that try to deprive workers of the protections and benefits they are entitled to under the law by wrongly treating them as independent contractors, rather than employees. Now, some workers and regulators are accusing companies like Uber, which connects cars with passengers on mobile apps, of doing the same thing to the thousands of drivers, couriers and others who work for them. Agricultural businesses, textile mills, construction firms and other enterprises have often classified workers as contractors to lower their costs by, for example, not paying workers the statutory minimum wage […]

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Seton Hall Graduates Have Significantly Higher Employment Rate than National Average

from Pirate Press Seton Hall University’s Class of 2014 has a significantly higher employment rate than the national average six months after graduation. A University Career Center-sponsored survey of the alumni shows an employment rate of 86 percent in a career-related job six months post-graduation. The National Association of Colleges and Employers’ Preliminary Results Report puts the national employment rate for graduates with bachelor’s degrees, excluding post-graduation internships, at 67 percent. Further analysis of the Seton Hall Class of 2014’s employment success shows 81 percent had at least one semester of experiential education – internships, clinical rotations, student teaching or […]

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Why LinkedIn is Important to Your Career

from SEJ While it may not be the sexiest of social media networks, LinkedIn is definitely the most important one for professionals. With more than 277 million members, there’s no denying LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network. In fact, professionals are signing up to join LinkedIn at an astounding rate of more than two new members per second. And that’s just the beginning of LinkedIn’s potential. A whopping 94 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn to vet candidates. Moreover, LinkedIn’s growth in web traffic grew by 34.51 percent in 2013. In short, LinkedIn use is not only increasing with millennials, it’s also become the […]

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5 Ways The Internet Will Revolutionize Work And Play By 2025

from co.EXIST For all the ways the Internet has changed how we live and work over the last 20 years, there are still plenty of areas it hasn’t touched, and plenty more where it hasn’t been as revolutionary as predicted. (Futurists in the ’90s said we’d all be making virtual commutes by now. Most of us are still waiting.) One limiting factor has been connectivity speeds, which haven’t grown to allow for more sophisticated services and, in the U.S., have even fallen behind other nations. The current U.S. average connection speed is 10.5 megabits per second (Mbps) compared to speeds […]

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The New Bachelor’s Payoff

from Inside Higher Ed Doubts about the labor-market returns of bachelor’s degrees, while never serious, can be put to rest. Last month’s federal jobs report showed a rock-bottom unemployment rate of 2.8 percent for workers who hold at least a four-year degree. The overall unemployment rate is 5.7 percent. But even that welcome economic news comes with wrinkles. A prominent financial analyst last week signaled an alarm that employers soon may face a shortage of job-seeking college graduates. And the employment report was a reminder of continuing worries about “upcredentialing” by employers, who are imposing new degree requirements on jobs. “Presumably, these educated workers are the […]

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Madam C.E.O., Get Me a Coffee

from NYTs LATE one Friday afternoon at a leading consulting firm, a last-minute request came in from a client. A female manager was the first to volunteer her time. She had already spent the entire day meeting with junior colleagues who were seeking career advice, even though they weren’t on her team. Earlier in the week, she had trained several new hires, helped a colleague improve a presentation and agreed to plan the office holiday party. When it came time for her review for partner, her clear track record as a team player combined with her excellent performance should have […]

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When Talking About Bias Backfires

from NYTs A FATHER and his son are in a car accident. The father is killed and the son is seriously injured. The son is taken to the hospital where the surgeon says, “I cannot operate, because this boy is my son.” This popular brain teaser dates back many years, but it remains relevant today; 40 to 75 percent of people still can’t figure it out. Those who do solve it usually take a few minutes to fathom that the boy’s mother could be a surgeon. Even when we have the best of intentions, when we hear “surgeon” or “boss,” the image that pops […]

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At Universities, a Push for Data-Driven Career Services

from Bits Blog Officials at the University of California, San Diego, had sparse information on the career success of their graduates until they set up a branded page for the university on LinkedIn a couple of years ago. “Back then, we had records on 125,000 alumni, but we had good employment information on less than 10,000 of them,” recalled Armin Afsahi, who oversees alumni relations as the university’s associate vice chancellor for advancement. “Aside from Qualcomm, which is in our back yard, we didn’t know who employed our alumni.” Within three months of setting up the university page, LinkedIn connections […]

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Speaking While Female

From NYTs YEARS ago, while producing the hit TV series “The Shield,” Glen Mazzara noticed that two young female writers were quiet during story meetings. He pulled them aside and encouraged them to speak up more. Watch what happens when we do, they replied. Almost every time they started to speak, they were interrupted or shot down before finishing their pitch. When one had a good idea, a male writer would jump in and run with it before she could complete her thought. Sadly, their experience is not unusual. More here.

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Whether Working or Job Seeking, the Algorithm Is Watching

from Bits Blog Are you perusing LinkedIn at work more than usual? That small change in behavior could set off alerts in computer analytics programs used to surveil and rank employees, according to a forthcoming book, “The Reputation Economy: How to Optimize Your Digital Footprint in a World Where Your Reputation Is Your Most Valuable Asset.” If your LinkedIn browsing is noticed “by a recruiter, look forward to increased cold calls trying to lure you into new jobs,” the authors write. “If it’s caught by your company, look forward to either a conversation about what it would take to keep […]

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