Google Updates Policy on News Pay Walls. ‘First Click Free’ to End.

from NYTs Publications like The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times and The New York Times have long asked readers to pay for access to online articles. But many reading this article online are probably familiar with an easy workaround: Plug a search term or headline into Google, and voilà! Free access to articles normally locked behind pay walls. That digital sleight of hand is great for inquisitive readers, but bad for the publishers that are increasingly dependent on subscription dollars for survival. So now, in an acknowledgment of this industrywide strategy shift, Google is working on new tools that […]

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Learning Curve

from Medium We’re in the midst of the most important shift in civilization since the invention of the steam engine?—?the pervasive application of intelligence into every aspect of the world. My goal today is to equip you with the tools you need for thinking about a world of pervasive intelligence, because that will describe both the sorts of investments you will be presented with, and the overall environment within which you will make those investments. So without further ado, let’s Go… More here.

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Why You Should Be Using a Password Manager

from iThemes Every few weeks, we hear the news that another major website has been hacked. Often these hacks mean your personal information has also been compromised. In this post, we cover the important reasons for why you should use a password manager to protect your online identity, and how to get started with LastPass, a free password manager. More here.

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Apple’s Use of Face Recognition in the New iPhone: Implications

from ACLU Apple unveiled its new iPhone X Tuesday, and it will include extensive face recognition capabilities. Face recognition (as I have discussed) is one of the more dangerous biometrics from a privacy standpoint, because it can be leveraged for mass tracking across society. But Apple has a proven record of achieving widespread acceptance for technologies that it incorporates into its phones. So what are we to think of this new deployment? The first question is whether the technology will be successful. Face and iris recognition technology incorporated into some other phones (such as Samsung’s) has widely been seen as […]

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Combating Sexism in Tech With Honesty: The Impact of Upload’s Silence

from Medium I was the Creative Producer at Upload until most of the Upload San Francisco staff and I quit after a sexual harassment lawsuit was filed against its founders. We used to love Upload for its reach and ambition, but our trust in the company has faltered since our departure. These are my thoughts on bro culture in tech and the impact of Upload’s silence. Upload jump-started my career and made me feel welcome when I moved to San Francisco by myself. Will and Taylor treated me extremely well, and I once viewed them as both my mentors and […]

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Your Artificial Intelligence Is Not Bias-Free

from Forbes Machines have no emotions. So, they must be objective — right? Not so fast. A new wave of algorithmic issues has recently hit the news, bringing the bias of AI into greater focus. The question now is not just whether we should allow AI to replace humans in industry, but how to prevent these tools from further perpetrating race and gender biases that are harmful to society if and when they do. First, a look at bias itself. Where do machines get it, and how can it be avoided? The answer is not as simple as it seems. To […]

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The Equifax Hack And How To Protect Your Family — All Explained In 5 Minutes

from freeCodeCamp In 1989, the US government decided to concentrate our most sensitive data in the hands of three giant finance corporations: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. These three corporations now store our biographic information, every address we’ve ever lived at, and every major financial transaction we’ve ever made — all so they can assign us a FICO credit score. And one of these companies just got hacked. On September 8, Equifax announced what is now the worst data breach in history. And yes — you are most likely a victim of it. Here’s how this whole disaster unfolded. More here.

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A Hardware Privacy Monitor for iPhones

from Schneier on Security Andrew “bunnie” Huang and Edward Snowden have designed a hardware device that attaches to an iPhone and monitors it for malicious surveillance activities, even in instances where the phone’s operating system has been compromised. They call it an Introspection Engine, and their use model is a journalist who is concerned about government surveillance: Our introspection engine is designed with the following goals in mind: More here.

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Every Business is a Technology Business

from HuffPo According to Gartner, global IT spending is projected to reach $3.5 trillion in 2017. Data Center Systems represent $171 billion spend in 2017. The explosion of data from Internet of Things (IoT) devices and video streaming has created a great demand for bandwidth in data centers. Data center trends and focus areas on bundling of 25GbE bundles up to 100GbE speeds, big data analytics, higher port densities, and power efficiency is driving the next generation data center architectures. In a digital economy, businesses today expect reliable, flexible, and secure data center systems with purpose-driven innovation for greatest business […]

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The Walls Are Closing In On Tech Giants

from Axios Tech behemoths Google, Facebook and Amazon are feeling the heat from the far-left and the far-right, and even the center is starting to fold. Why it matters: Criticism over the companies’ size, culture and overall influence in society is getting louder as they infiltrate every part of our lives. Though it’s mostly rhetoric rather than action at the moment, that could change quickly in the current political environment. Here’s a breakdown of the three biggest fights they’re facing. More here.

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Europe Is Developing Offensive Cyber Capabilities. The United States Should Pay Attention.

from Net Politics It is no surprise that the United States and its European allies are looking to integrate offensive cyber capabilities as part of their military operations. Last year, the Pentagon boasted about dropping “cyber bombs” on the self-declared Islamic State group. France and the United Kingdom have built similar capabilities, as have smaller European states, such as Denmark, Sweden, Greece and the Netherlands. Unfortunately, as NATO members rush to build their capabilities, they will quickly have to confront challenging trade-offs. Cyberweapons—or specifically the vulnerabilities they exploit—tend to be single use weapons: once a defender or vendor identifies a […]

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Robots Aren’t Human. You Only Make Them So

from Wired IF A ROBOT were to look at you with a twinkle in its eye, you wouldn’t be blamed for running away in terror. But that plunge into the uncanny valley doesn’t bother Max Aguilera-Hellweg, who’s been photographing anthropomorphic bots since 2010. “I’ve never found myself afraid of any of them,” he says. In fact, he’d love for his subjects to appear more lifelike. A student of anatomy—Aguilera-­Hellweg graduated from med school at 48—he looks for “the right angle to find that bit of humanness.” But the point of his new book, Humanoid, isn’t to terrify you. It’s to […]

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Canada Tries to Turn Its A.I. Ideas Into Dollars

from NYTs Long before Google started working on cars that drive themselves and Amazon was creating home appliances that talk, a handful of researchers in Canada — backed by the Canadian government and universities — were laying the groundwork for today’s boom in artificial intelligence. But the center of the commercial gold rush has been a long way away, in Silicon Valley. In recent years, many of Canada’s young A.I. scientists, lured by lucrative paydays from Google, Facebook, Apple and other companies, have departed. Canada is producing a growing number of A.I start-ups, but they often head to California, where […]

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23 Things Artificially Intelligent Computers Can Do Better/Faster/Cheaper Than You Can

from Seth’s Blog Predict the weather Read an X-ray Play Go Correct spelling Figure out the P&L of a large company Pick a face out of a crowd Count calories Fly a jet across the country Maintain the temperature of your house Book a flight Give directions Create an index for a book Play Jeopardy Weld a metal seam Trade stocks Place online ads Figure out what book to read next Water a plant Monitor a premature newborn Detect a fire Play poker Read documents in a lawsuit Sort packages If you’ve seen enough movies, you’ve probably bought into the homunculus […]

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Handcuffing Cities to Help Telecom Giants

from Backchannel It’s good to be one of the handful of companies controlling data transmission in America. It’s even better?—?from their perspective?—?to avoid oversight. And it’s best of all to be a carrier that gets government to actually stop existing oversight. The stagnant telecommunications industry in America has long pursued the second of those goals?—?avoiding oversight, or even long-range thinking that would favor the interests of all other businesses and all other Americans over those of AT&T, Verizon, Charter, and Comcast?—?by proclaiming that there is something really magnificent coming any day now from the industry that will make anything regulators […]

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I Wuv You Wobot!

from kottke Rayna is a small child who thinks this hot water heater looks like a robot and she is determined to say hi to it and tell it that she loves it. THIS IS THE CUTEST THING OF ALL TIME THAT IS NOT THAT PHOTO OF OTTERS HOLDING HANDS SO THEY DON’T DRIFT AWAY FROM EACH OTHER WHILE SLEEPING. In the future, when humanity is on trial for the mistreatment of machines, our randomly assigned legal algorithm will introduce this video as Exhibit A in our defense. I like our chances. More here.

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Elon Musk Is Setting Up A Company That Will Link Brains And Computers

from ars technica Billionaire futurist space explorer Elon Musk has a new project: a “medical research company” called Neuralink that will make brain-computer interfaces. Musk’s projects are frequently inspired by science fiction, and this one is a direct reference to a device called a “neural lace,” invented by the late British novelist Iain M. Banks for his Culture series. In those books, characters grow a semi-organic mesh on their cerebral cortexes, which allows them to interface wirelessly with AIs and create backups of their minds. Having a neural lace, in Banks’ fiction, makes people essentially immortal—if they die, they’re revived from […]

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Five New Human Rights For The Digital Age

from Medium Here are some core human rights that I humbly suggest might form part of a what I like to call a Digital Ethics Manifesto: 1. The right to remain natural, i.e. ‘merely’ biological and organic. We must continue to have the choice to exist in an unaugmented state. We need to retain the right to work or be employed, use public services, buy things, and function in society without the need to deploy technology with, on or — most importantly — inside our bodies. Various expressions of what I like to call #WiredOrFired — fears are already an issue […]

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How Not To Freak Out About Cyber War

from The New Yorker In 2007, Admiral Mike McConnell, the wonky former head of the National Security Agency, became the director of National Intelligence, and soon discovered that many senior American officials were not remotely prepared for the advent of digital warfare. (Less than a year earlier, Senator Ted Stevens, of Alaska, who chaired the main Senate committee that regulates the Internet, had described the Web as a “series of tubes.”) To grab his peers’ attention, McConnell adopted the intelligence community’s version of a party trick: when visiting a Cabinet officer, he would pull out a copy of a memo […]

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Police Falsely Told A Man He Couldn’t Film Them. ‘I’m An Attorney,’ He Said. ‘I Know What The Law Is.’

from WaPo One of the first things Jesse Bright did after being pulled over by police on a recent Sunday afternoon was turn on his phone and begin filming. Bright was driving for Uber to make some extra cash, but he works full-time as criminal defense attorney in North Carolina. As a lawyer, he said, he believes strongly that when people record their interactions with police, it helps reduce confusion if their cases end up in court. As he aimed his phone in the direction of officers and recorded, Bright was surprised to hear Wilmington police Sgt. Kenneth Becker tell […]

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