10 Next-Generation Leaders On Leadership

from Fast Company The Fast Company Impact Council, an invitation-only group of corporate leaders, entrepreneurial founders, and other leaders from across industries, gathered on June 30 to share their insights. Members split into small groups, moderated by Fast Companyeditors, and shared their perspectives on how they are managing and innovating amid a trio of crises: the global pandemic, the economic slowdown, and calls for social justice in the wake of the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery. In this roundtable discussion, led by editor-in-chief Stephanie Mehta, top executives discussed the New New Rules of Leadership. Participants in […]

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A Different Kind of Civil-Service Organization

from The Atlantic The U.S. national government is failing in its response to the pandemic. One recent example: A month ago, on March 20, the United States and South Korea had about the same number of coronavirus deaths: nearly 100 in South Korea, versus somewhere over 200 in the U.S. Since South Korea has a much smaller population—about 50 million, versus more than 300 million for the U.S.—its per capita death rate was actually much higher. One month later, South Korea’s death total had risen to only 236—while that in the U.S. was rising quickly past 40,000. With adjustments for […]

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Thoughts On “I’m Bored”

from Seth’s Blog If you’re under 14: “Good.” It’s good that you’re feeling bored. Bored is an actual feeling. Bored can prompt forward motion. Bored is the thing that happens before you choose to entertain yourself. Bored is what empty space feels like, and you can use that empty space to go do something important. Bored means that you’re paying attention (no one is bored when they’re asleep.) If you’re over 14: “That’s on you.” As soon as you’re tired of being bored at work, at home, on lockdown, wherever, you’ll go find a challenge. You don’t have to quit […]

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The Stillman Disruption Journal: Students Building a Better Tomorrow

from Medium Our homes are filled with AI systems telling us what we need to buy at the grocery store. China uses a facial recognition system to keep tabs on over a billion people. I still remember seeing Uber’s self-driving cars on the streets of Pittsburgh on my commute to high school multiple times a week, dating back as early as 2015. All around us, we can see the early effects of a coming digital revolution slowly working their way into our homes and lives. It’s happening, whether we wish to acknowledge it or not. These few examples just skim […]

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The Expert Generalist: Why the Future Belongs to Polymaths

from Medium Some of history’s greatest contributions have come from polymaths. Aristotle practically invented half a dozen fields of study across philosophy. Galileo was as much a physicist as he was an engineer when he helped kick-start the scientific revolution. Da Vinci might have been even more famous as an inventor than an artist if his notebooks were ever published. Even in the last 100 years, we have had people like John Von Neumann and Herbert Simon who have made breakthrough advances across fields as diverse as computer science, economics, and psychology. That is, of course, not to detract from […]

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Katherine Johnson Dies at 101; Mathematician Broke Barriers at NASA

from NYTs They asked Katherine Johnson for the moon, and she gave it to them. Wielding little more than a pencil, a slide rule and one of the finest mathematical minds in the country, Mrs. Johnson, who died at 101 on Monday at a retirement home in Newport News, Va., calculated the precise trajectories that would let Apollo 11 land on the moon in 1969 and, after Neil Armstrong’s history-making moonwalk, let it return to Earth. A single error, she well knew, could have dire consequences for craft and crew. Her impeccable calculations had already helped plot the successful flight […]

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On the Trail of America’s First Women to Vote

from NYTs It has long been seen as one of the flukes of American political history: For three decades after the American Revolution, the women of New Jersey had equal voting rights with men. The state was the first — and for a long time, the only — to explicitly enfranchise women, in laws passed more than a century before the 19th Amendment enshrined the principle of gender equality at the polls in the United States Constitution. But this being New Jersey, things quickly came to mischief. There were charges of rampant fraud and corruption, as newspapers filled with tales […]

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These 5 Tools Helped One Woman Increase Her Income By 30%

from Forbes My former colleague and current friend, Liz, feels she now makes, “a ludicrous amount of money.” Recently, she accepted a new position after having negotiated a 30% increase from her previous salary. We chatted about how she used the strategies I taught her, along with some of her own, to make the leap. Here are the 5 tools she used: More here.

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The Transition To Leadership

from Seth’s Blog The flawed theory is that A+ students become good leaders. There’s no reason to think that this should be true. Doing well on tests, paying attention to what’s being asked, being diligent in short-term error correction–these are three hallmarks of someone who is good at school. None of these are important once you’re charged with charting a new path, with figuring out what to do next. In fact, they get in the way. We invented the educational regime to produce compliant factory workers. But the most compliant aren’t always suited to be the bravest, the most empathic […]

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Living in Dark Mode

from NYTs THE LIGHTS IN MY ROOM ARE OFF, and the autumn air is trickling in through the window. It is my favorite season in Hong Kong, finally cool enough to get by without air-conditioning. I’m listening to meditation music a friend sent me to ease my persistent insomnia. My partner is staying up late, hunched over his desk with a tall can of beer, tweeting updates for a local media outlet. Outside, a revolution is raging. I check my phone to see whether my ex-flatmate, who has gone out to pick up protesters in his car, has responded to […]

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Out With the Old, In With the Young

from NYTs IT’S NOT JUST THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP is a well-seasoned 73 and his three top Democratic Party challengers are also septuagenarians. The average senator is now almost 63 and the average member of the House nearly 58, making them roughly 20 years older than their average constituent, and nearly a decade older than they were in 1981. Older people today hold disproportionate power because they have the numbers and the means to do so. People 65 and older, for example, are more than three times as likely to make political donations as those under 30. As a result, their […]

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Leadership Tips: Empathy Is Key

from Forbes For everything that goes into products and marketing and every other aspect of your company, running a business is very much a proposition about people. Facing outward, it’s about convincing people to buy your product, partner with you, invest in you; internally, it’s about the work done by the people you bring in and the relationships that enable everyone to work together. Any leader or manager can be said to be as much a manager of people as tasks and responsibilities, and part of effective management is being able to understand and connect with co-workers and employees, often […]

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The Professional Triumph of the Firstborns

from The Atlantic When corporate boards pick out new CEOs, they scrutinize candidates’ qualifications, studying their performance in previous jobs and vetting their academic credentials. But a recent study suggests they might want to look even further back in the histories of corporate hopefuls: CEOs’ experiences in childhood seem to shape what kind of leaders they grow up to be. The study—co-authored by the University of Chicago’s Todd Henderson and Florida State University’s Irena Hutton—looked at more than 650 CEOs’ birth order, family size, and history of childhood trauma, as well as their parents’ occupations and socioeconomic standing. This information […]

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The Role Of Higher Education In A ‘Post-Truth’ Era

from Education Dive From the Ancient Greeks to educational reformer John Dewey, and from the suffrage and civil rights movements to modern issues of inequality, educated citizens have played a key role in participatory democracy. And universities have advanced this role by preparing students to critically engage with the issues that affect their lives. At institutions of higher learning, students gain the tools to discover and evaluate facts, test theories and deepen their understanding of themselves and the world. But our current cultural moment has raised an urgent question: What is the role of higher education at a time when the very […]

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Not Voting Doubles the Value of Someone Else’s Vote

from kottke In his Rolling Stone article on John McCain’s failed campaign for the 2000 Republican nomination for President, David Foster Wallace wrote about how not voting is like shooting yourself in the foot. If you are bored and disgusted by politics and don’t bother to vote, you are in effect voting for the entrenched Establishments of the two major parties, who please rest assured are not dumb, and who are keenly aware that it is in their interests to keep you disgusted and bored and cynical and to give you every possible psychological reason to stay at home doing […]

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Why Organizations Need Digital Leaders With These Five Key Strengths

from Forbes Much has been said about the critical need for organizations to embrace technology and outpace digital disruption — and I couldn’t agree more. But the critical question in this discussion is: “How?” What exactly are the best practices and strategies companies must master to successfully undergo digital transformation? My organization set out to answer that question in a study of nearly 3,000 workers and 900 hiring decision-makers across the U.S., and we found many organizations are still struggling to conquer the post-digital frontier. However, among companies that have mastered the digital realm, we uncovered a common thread: They […]

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We’re Not Job Hopping Enough, That’s A Problem For Fed Chair Powell

from Forbes Janet Yellen, the former Chair of the Federal Reserve of the United States and a leading labor economist, had a rule of thumb: to achieve a healthy labor market, U.S. nominal wages needed to grow 3 – 4%.  Her successor, Jerome Powell, faces a challenge; despite a U.S. unemployment rate close to multi-decade lows, nominal wage improvements have lagged. This isn’t just a U.S. phenomenon. Research from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) shows that since 2007, in G-7 countries, real wages increased 0.5% annually, compared to 1.3% over the previous decade. Since real-wages adjust for […]

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The 12 Crucial Leadership Traits Of A Growth Mindset

from Forbes Employees are tired of being told what to do and just checking the box.  So are their leaders – even if they won’t admit it.  They are tired of just doing what they are told. By following the same corporate playbook, they have little room to grow and evolve as individuals.  They want to do more and be more entrepreneurial. They want their professional goals and those of their organization to be in alignment. The result is most leaders are conflicted, battling the gulf between assimilation to what the corporate playbook dictates and being the authentic and vulnerable […]

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