Everyone Is Creative, Including You

from Medium Surprisingly when I ask that question of students in my introductory creative class only about half the class raises their hands. They’re often taking Fundamentals of Creative Development because it’s required for all advertising majors, not just those interested in becoming a writer, art director, or designer. If I have one goal it’s to convince everyone in the class that he or she is creative. We’re all creative. Everyone is creative. Sadly, most of our public schools, in their misguided efforts to prepare students for standardized test taking, destroy kids’ natural creativity. Studies have even shown that creativity drops precipitously […]

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How African-American Writers Have Revived And Reshaped “Black Panther”

from co.CREATE When Marvel Comics announced this week that red-hot cultural commentator Ta-Nehisi Coates would be writing its new Black Pantherseries, comics fans and people who are invested in progressive views on social justice both had serious freakouts. Coates is one of the most perceptive and thoughtful writers working today, and he’s also a lifelong comic book fan—a combination that should help elevate the new Black Panther title to one of the flagship books in Marvel’s line. That’s fitting, given the company’s plans for the character — Black Panther is a big part of the cinematic future of the Marvel Universe, with an anticipated debut in next […]

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Ad Blocking

from Seth Godin By most accounts, more and more people are automatically blocking the ads in their browser. Of course, people have been blocking ads forever. By ignoring them. Fifteen years ago, when I began writing about Permission Marketing, I pointed out that when ads are optional, it’s only anticipated, personal and relevant ones that will pay off. And advertisers have had fifteen years to show self restraint. They’ve had the chance to not secretly track people, set cookies for their own benefit, insert popunders and popovers and poparounds, and mostly, deliver us ads we actually want to see. Alas, it was […]

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Designing Urban Walks

from Medium Personal projects are not easy. They might look easy, but if you are trying to make something real and tangible it is quite hard; considering you have full time job and on top of that absolutely no budget. I am a designer who is obsessed with traveling, maps and photography. What a cliché! I was dreaming of writing my own New York City guide the moment I moved to NYC 7 years ago. Over the years I was making multiple design attempts on this topic: once .NET Magazine asked me to design a concept for city guide that I created for one of […]

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LinkedIn’s CEO Thinks His $1.5B Buy Will Make You Smarter

from Wired ONLINE JOB-TRAINING SITE Lynda has built a library of more than 6,300 courses that teach business and technology skills from better navigating Excel to using design software. And now that library belongs to LinkedIn. The $1.5 billion acquisition, which is the largest in LinkedIn’s history, is part of CEO Jeff Weiner’s master plan to make LinkedIn not just a resume repository, but a place for professionals to manage their careers and, increasingly, learn new skills—especially in the world’s fastest-growing economies.  In the last year, LinkedIn has more than doubled its Chinese user base, but still only 9 million of […]

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At Least One State has a (Fiber) Backbone

from Medium Backchannel Maybe you remember Sir Boss, aka Hank Morgan, the leading character in one of Samuel Clemens’s, aka Mark Twain’s, most famous books. He begins his story this way: “I am an an American. I was born and reared in Hartford, Connecticut. So I am a Yankee of the Yankees?—?and practical; yes, and nearly barren of sentiment.” The book, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, is (among many other things) a close look at the sweeping technological change Clemens/Twain saw happening around him in late-19th century Hartford. The country was industrializing, and Hank was an industrial innovator. He […]

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The Hackathon Fast Track, From Campus to Silicon Valley

from NYTs Shariq Hashme squints at his laptop screen as he scrolls through hundreds of lines of computer code. “I can’t even make sense of it right now,” he says with a grimace. The long string of numbers, symbols and letters would usually be intelligible to Mr. Hashme, a 21-year-old computer science major at the University of Maryland, College Park, but at this moment, he’s having trouble even keeping his eyes open. In the last 27 hours, he has slept just two. It’s 2:37 a.m. on a Sunday, and he is toiling alongside 671 young software engineers who are camped […]

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How GitHub Conquered Google, Microsoft, and Everyone Else

from Wired CHRIS DIBONA WAS worried everything would end up in one place.  This was a decade ago, before the idea of open source software flipped the tech world upside-down. The open source Linux operating system was already running an enormous number of machines on Wall Street and beyond, proving you can generate big value—and big money—by freely sharing software code with the world at large. But the open source community was still relatively small. When coders started new open source projects, they typically did so on a rather geeky and sometimes unreliable internet site called SourceForge. DiBona, the long-haired open source guru inside Google, […]

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The Mercedes Robo-Car That Made Me Want to Stop Driving

from Wired ONE SUNNY DAY last week, I drove from my office in San Francisco over the Bay Bridge, down Interstate 880 and into a parking lot at the defunct Alameda Naval Air Station. I was late, so I wasn’t exactly driving cautiously. I weaved through traffic going 15 mph over the speed limit, alternating between tailgating and passing cars on the right. Because I didn’t know where I was going and didn’t take the time to plug the address in the car’s nav system, I had my eyes glued to my phone for much of the trip.  I was an example […]

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The Tricorder, An All-In-One Diagnostic Device, Draws Nigh

from readwrite After pushing back deadlines by a few months, the 10 remaining teams in the Tricorder X Prize are nearing the day they will deliver a device that can diagnose 15 diseases and other basic health information through at-home tests. The teams are scheduled to deliver working prototypes in June to a UC-San Diego study that will test the devices on patients with known medical disorders to measure their accuracy. “We’re pretty confident that the majority of the 10 finalist teams will actually be able to deliver,” senior director Grant Company said. “Some may merge, and some may fall out, just because they can’t […]

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5 Ways The Internet Will Revolutionize Work And Play By 2025

from co.EXIST For all the ways the Internet has changed how we live and work over the last 20 years, there are still plenty of areas it hasn’t touched, and plenty more where it hasn’t been as revolutionary as predicted. (Futurists in the ’90s said we’d all be making virtual commutes by now. Most of us are still waiting.) One limiting factor has been connectivity speeds, which haven’t grown to allow for more sophisticated services and, in the U.S., have even fallen behind other nations. The current U.S. average connection speed is 10.5 megabits per second (Mbps) compared to speeds […]

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Cortana Reportedly Wants To Bust Out Of Windows Jail – But Then What?

from readwrite Microsoft’s Cortana app will make its way to iOS and Android devices in the near future, a new report from Reuters says, quoting “people familiar with the matter.” The rumor has in fact been doing the rounds for some time: Last November, Microsoft executive Julie Larson-Green hinted that such a move was on the cards in a briefing with reporters. Getting the app on other devices is one thing; getting anyone to use it is quite another. Assuming Cortana jumps out of Windows, can it thrive elsewhere? More here.

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The FCC Did NOT Make the Internet a Public Utility

from Medium Today the Federal Communications Commission voted 3–2 to approve of Title II-backed net neutrality regulations. It’s a big and important day for the Internet. As I write this, advocates all across D.C. are celebrating. And they should! Not so long ago, after the D.C. Circuit ruled against the FCC in Verizon v. FCC, many pronounced that net neutrality was dead. Seriously?—?the spirit around the effort and the Internet was pretty moribund. See how many hyperlinks that was? I wasn’t joking. The history of how “net neutrality came back from the dead” and the roles that the public, advocacy groups and companies (small and big) played in that revival will be important?—?and maybe will offer some […]

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Why Innovation Must Go Beyond Disruption

from Wired Henry Ford famously quipped that if he’d asked what people wanted, they’d have said, “faster horses.” There are countless numbers of ideas being funded every day that are aimed at essentially building faster horses. The result is that we have available an enormous embarrassment of riches in technology, information and economy – but how many of them are truly groundbreaking or innovative? The real breakthroughs happen when we venture outside of convention and learn to look at problems a different way. The real ideas come when we make links where no one else has, a theory put forth […]

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The Big Lock-In

from Medium What if all of the devices in your life had a common interface, controlled by a single company, that picked what video content you could easily search and access online? What if that single company had its own economic reasons to support some “channels” and hide others? Welcome to the world of Xfinity, Comcast’s brand name for its services. You’ve seen the advertising. Now here’s the big idea: If Comcast has its way, Xfinity will be Americans’ window on the world. Basically, our only window. First, some background. In 1996, Congress passed a law directing the FCC to ensure a competitive […]

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The Future of the Internet Might Hinge on This Bet

from Medium Humans are driven by metaphors. We can’t help it. “Internet access is like electricity,” we say, and that leads to a host of other mental images: standard plugs for a wealth of devices, warm light against a dark frozen landscape, the burdens of life made more bearable. The warring metaphor now is “the Internet is the new TV,” thoroughly managed, channelized, bent on entertainment, ad-driven, interactive only when it suits someone’s business plan. Both of these metaphors are limited and not quite right. That’s the way metaphors work. But we are in fact ants on a wrinkle of […]

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Firmly Outside the Box

from Harvard Law Today Each day at her job at a venture capital firm, Sarah (Burgess) Reed ’91 logs 7 to 8 miles on a treadmill desk, which is outfitted with a work surface that puts her computer, phone, documents—and water—all within easy reach. “It’s the ‘gameification’ of the law,” jokes Reed, using a term that comes up a lot in the venture capital world. “I’m reading these terribly dry documents all day long, so I play a game with myself of how many miles I can walk while I’m reading them.” It’s typical of Reed’s approach to problem-solving. From […]

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3d Printing: Who’s Investing Now and What’s Coming Next?

from Gigaom Printing has come a long way since Gutenberg and the first printing press in 1439. The printing industry has evolved from the golden age of printing blocks to modern 2D printers capable of mass-producing documents in minutes. We have seen these devices become an integral part of our lives, but today’s technology is taking them even further for the everyday consumer. What once seemed like science fiction is now a reality, with 3D printers creating anything from mechanical parts to prosthetics. More here.

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Since 2004, This Small Team Has Been Crushing The Podcasting Competition

from Fast Company One afternoon in 2004, Mikel Ellcessor walked into his boss’s office with a big idea. At the time, he was the head of local content for New York public radio station WNYC. It was making all sorts of interesting shows, but connecting them with the right audience could be difficult. Distributing them outside of New York was complicated and time-consuming, and involved convincing a big group of people working at local public radio stations around the country that a new show was worth their time (and money). It was as if the people behind Parks and Recreation […]

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