How to Beat the Robots

from NYTs Maybe the automation of jobs will eventually create new, better jobs. Maybe it will put us all out of work. But as we argue about this, work is changing. Today’s jobs — white collar, blue collar or no collar — require more education and interpersonal skills than those in the past. And many of the people whose jobs have already been automated can’t find new ones. Technology leads to economic growth, but the benefits aren’t being parceled out equally. Policy makers have the challenge of helping workers share the gains. That will take at least some government effort, […]

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The New York Times Claws Its Way Into The Future

from Wired ARTHUR GREGG SULZBERGER doesn’t remember the first time he visited the family business. He was young, he says, no older than 6, when he shuffled through the brass-plated revolving doors of the old concrete hulk on 43rd Street and boarded the elevator up to his father’s and grandfather’s offices. He often visited for a few minutes before taking a trip to the newsroom on the third floor, all typewriters and moldering stacks of paper, and then he’d sometimes go down to the subbasement to take in the oily scents and clanking sounds of the printing press. This was the early […]

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Who Will Lead In The Smart Machine Age?©

from Forbes We are on the brink of a technology tsunami that will likely be as challenging and transformative for us as the Industrial Revolution was for our ancestors. This tsunami will be led by artificial intelligence (AI), increased global connectivity, the Internet of Things, major advances in computing power, and virtual and augmented reality.  As a result, the Smart Machine Age (SMA) will fundamentally change the availability and nature of human work and make obsolete the dominate Industrial Revolution model of business organization and leadership. The organization of the future will be staffed by a combination of smart robots, […]

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The Next Manufacturing Revolution Is Here

from TED Economic growth has been slowing for the past 50 years, but relief might come from an unexpected place — a new form of manufacturing that is neither what you thought it was nor where you thought it was. Industrial systems thinker Olivier Scalabre details how a fourth manufacturing revolution will produce a macroeconomic shift and boost employment, productivity and growth. More here.

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How Computers Are Learning To Be Creative

from TED We’re on the edge of a new frontier in art and creativity — and it’s not human. Blaise Agüera y Arcas, principal scientist at Google, works with deep neural networks for machine perception and distributed learning. In this captivating demo, he shows how neural nets trained to recognize images can be run in reverse, to generate them. The results: spectacular, hallucinatory collages (and poems!) that defy categorization. “Perception and creativity are very intimately connected,” Agüera y Arcas says. “Any creature, any being that is able to do perceptual acts is also able to create.” More here.

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Even Steve Jobs Didn’t Predict the iPhone Decade

from Wired When Apple set out to build a smartphone, the team tasked with doing so didn’t plan on changing the world. It didn’t foresee the App Store becoming a billion-dollar business full of billion-dollar businesses like Uber, Snapchat, and WhatsApp. It wasn’t trying to reinvent how people communicate, shop, and even hook up. It was trying to build an iPod that made phone calls. “The grand vision wasn’t really articulated, because there wasn’t one,” says Andy Grignon, a senior manager on the project and now a partner at design firm Siberia. Even the name, iPhone, started as an homage to Apple’s hit music player. Most early prototypes featured a screen and a click […]

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I Dream of the Post Office Buying Twitter

from StartupGrind Yes, it’s a goofy dream. Yes, Congress won’t let them stop Saturday delivery, let alone spend $30 billion on a wobbly and weird social network. Yes, this will never happen. Yes, $30 billion could buy 90 F-35s instead. But: I can’t get this idea out of my head. My mind stumbles on it every other commute. Every news item about Twitter’s sale spurs the notion. Google and Disney are walking away leaving only Salesforce, but oh: they just bought Krux. Maybe there won’t be a suitor. Their market cap is down to less than $15 billion on the news. Hmm, that’s only 44 F-35s… Ok. This won’t […]

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Patent Troll Virnetx Beats Apple Again, Awarded $302M In Facetime Damages

from ars technica An East Texas jury concluded late Friday that Apple must pay a patent troll $302.4 million in damages for infringing two patents connected to Apple’s FaceTime communication application. The verdict is the third in the long-running case in which two earlier verdicts were overturned—one on appeal and the other by the Tyler, Texas federal judge presiding over the 6-year-long litigation. The latest outcome is certain to renew the same legal arguments that were made in the earlier cases: Apple, for one, has maintained all along that the evidence doesn’t support infringement. VirnetX, as it did in the […]

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Tesla Model S Hack

from Schneier on Security Impressive remote hack of the Tesla Model S.  Details. Video. The vulnerability has been fixed. Remember, a modern car isn’t an automobile with a computer in it. It’s a computer with four wheels and an engine. Actually, it’s a distributed 20-400-computer system with four wheels and an engine. More here.

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A Ride In Uber’s Self-Driving Car

from The New Yorker One day they just appeared—Ford Fusions, some black, some white, with uber stamped on the side. With their twenty cameras, seven lasers, and rooftop-mounted G.P.S., the self-driving cars stood out. People stopped and stared as they took trial journeys around Pittsburgh. That was in the spring. Now, in the waning days of summer, passengers hailing an Uber X may be picked up by one of the city’s many human drivers, or by one of a tiny fleet of autonomous vehicles. “I think that this is the most important thing that computers are going to do in the next […]

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The US Is No Longer The Dominant Engine Of Global Innovation, And Europe Will Overtake It? – Here’s Why

from Medium This is a guest article, my first for Tech.eu, which provides a brief introduction to my new book, which was published on May 31st and explores a controversial topic I raise in the last chapter: I believe the EU is on the verge of overtaking the U.S. as the better place for entrepreneurs to reside. Let me start with a quick personal background and the basic framework that guides the book and leads me to this conclusion. I have had the great fortune to live in some amazing cities in the Western world in the past two decades. Prior […]

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The Driverless Truck Is Coming, And It’s Going To Automate Millions Of Jobs

from TechCrunch A convoy of self-driving trucks recently drove across Europe and arrived at the Port of Rotterdam. No technology will automate away more jobs — or drive more economic efficiency — than the driverless truck. Shipping a full truckload from L.A. to New York costs around $4,500 today, with labor representing 75 percent of that cost. But those labor savings aren’t the only gains to be had from the adoption of driverless trucks. Where drivers are restricted by law from driving more than 11 hours per day without taking an 8-hour break, a driverless truck can drive nearly 24 hours per day. That means the technology would effectively double the output of the U.S. […]

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The Untold Story of Magic Leap, the World’s Most Secretive Startup

from Wired THERE IS SOMETHING special happening in a generic office park in an uninspiring suburb near Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Inside, amid the low gray cubicles, clustered desks, and empty swivel chairs, an impossible 8-inch robot drone from an alien planet hovers chest-high in front of a row of potted plants. It is steampunk-cute, minutely detailed. I can walk around it and examine it from any angle. I can squat to look at its ornate underside. Bending closer, I bring my face to within inches of it to inspect its tiny pipes and protruding armatures. I can see polishing swirls where […]

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Inside OpenAI, Elon Musk’s Wild Plan to Set Artificial Intelligence Free

from Wired The Friday afternoon news dump, a grand tradition observed by politicians and capitalists alike, is usually supposed to hide bad news. So it was a little weird that Elon Musk, founder of electric car maker Tesla, and Sam Altman, president of famed tech incubator Y Combinator, unveiled their new artificial intelligence company at the tail end of a weeklong AI conference in Montreal this past December. But there was a reason they revealed OpenAI at that late hour. It wasn’t that no one was looking. It was that everyone was looking. When some of Silicon Valley’s most powerful […]

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Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016)

The tributes to an exceptional artist are pouring in … You will find his Wikipedia article here … The NYTs obituary is here … And, the story of his relationship with the music industry is here … But, I think, his performance of While My Guitar Gently Weeps, with Tom Petty, Dhani Harrison, Steve Winwood, Jeff Lynne and others, at his 2004 Hall of Fame induction is among his most memorable … and his solo (beginning at 3:27) is nothing short of remarkable.

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Patti Smith On The Meaning Of Success And The Power Of Improvisation

from co.CREATE The singer/poet/novelist has etched out her place as a pop culture legend with landmark albums like Horses and National Book Award-winning memoirs like Just Kids. During a discussion with Ethan Hawke at the Tribeca Film Festival, Smith explained her definition of success, how improvisation has guided her career, and even the Chet Baker collaboration that never was. More here.

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What Does Cutting Rates On Student Loans Do?

from Brookings Are lower interest rates the best route to a fairer, more effective student loan program? From the rhetoric heard in Congress and on the campaign trail, the answer appears to be “yes.” But both empirical evidence and economic theory show that lowering interest rates is a blunt, ineffective, and expensive tool for increasing schooling and reducing loan defaults. There are much better ways to achieve these important goals. Let’s step back and consider why government lends to students in the first place. Education is an investment: it creates costs in the present but delivers benefits in the future. […]

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If You Build It, They Will Come

from 500ish Words This headline says it all: Pre-sales of Tesla’s Model 3 topped first-year projections in less than 24 hours. Impossible to overstate how crazy that is. And yet, it gets crazier. At the time that headline was written, pre-sales stood at 232,000. The latest number revealed by the company is now over 325,000. That’s over 300,000 real people, putting down a very real $1,000, to order a car that won’t be available until the end of 2017 (at the earliest).¹ For some context, Tesla just announced that total sales for its current line-up (Model S and Model X) were just under 15,000 last quarter […]

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