Stop Telling Good Arguers to Become Lawyers

from Medium I’ve met a lot of bright young people planning on law school or in law school. I’ve also met a lot of unhappy lawyers. I suspect lots of these young people will end up unhappy lawyers too, and I’ve got a theory as to why. Lawyers are often “successful” in terms of external indicators and cultural prestige. They tend to make good money and are held in esteem (lawyer jokes notwithstanding). And, of course, lawyering is a perfect fit for some people. I know some very happy lawyers. But it seems a large percentage of the profession consists of […]

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What Do Globally Competent Students Look Like?

from Medium All of our futures are increasingly linked to the challenges of the global community. The world’s population is predicted to grow from our current 7.3 billion to 8.5 billion in 2030 and to nearly 10 billion by 2050. Such population growth will affect a host of global issues including pollution, disease management, and depletion of energy, food and water resources. For students to participate effectively in this changing world, they must understand it. The 21st century student will sell to the world, buy from the world, work for international companies, compete with people from other countries, manage employees from […]

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Liberal Arts Degree to Software Industry

from Medium Last week I was at Whitman College talking to students in the newly created computer science department about careers in the tech industry. Many students were interested in knowing what they could do while still in school to better prepare themselves for joining the industry. Having watched a lot of interns and new graduates get started with their software engineering careers at facebook, here are my suggestions to anyone who is interested in hitting the ground running when they first join the industry. I’ll throw in some extra notes at the end for folks coming from a non-traditional engineering background?—?i.e. […]

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Is Business About To Disrupt The College Accreditation System?

from Brookings The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the world’s largest business organization, is the latest major player to recommend steps that could lead to a radical restructuring of higher education in America. The Chamber’s nonprofit affiliate issued a report last week arguing that employers should establish their own “talent supplier recognition and certification system” – essentially an alternative to the traditional college and university accreditation system. It’s hardly surprising that frustrated employers are looking to create an alternative to accreditation as a quality measure of the skills of college graduates. Accreditation has been attacked as a barrier to innovation and improvement in higher education. […]

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A Student Loan System Stacked Against the Borrower

from NYTs “It feels like I’m being set up to fail.” That’s how Patrick Wittwer, 31, described his experience trying to repay his roughly $50,000 in student loans. Between misdirected payments by one of the companies servicing his loan and the abusive collection tactics he encountered when he fell behind, Mr. Wittwer said the repayment process simply seemed stacked against him. A 2008 graduate of Temple University with a degree in media arts, Mr. Wittwer is not alone in his experience. Consumer advocates say student-loan servicers often make an already heavy debt load even more burdensome for borrowers. A report issued late […]

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Remember Your Old Graphing Calculator? It Still Costs a Fortune? Here’s Why

from Medium This year, high school juniors and seniors will buy a $100 calculator that’s older than they are. You remember the TI-83: the brick-sized graphing machine you likely covered in stickers and used to send messages, spell out obscenities, play games and maybe do some math, if you were paying close enough attention. Some students today will be the second generation to use it. The TI-83 was released in 1996, when mobile phones had antennas and PCs were mostly used for word processing. In 1996, Google was born. It was also the year of the Palm Pilot and Hotmail. […]

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10 Things Every College Professor Hates

from Business Insider I got this email from an Ivy League student when I arrived to give a speech. She was responsible for making sure that I was delivered to my hotel and knew where to go the next day: Omg you’re here! Ahh i need to get my s–t together now lol. Jk. Give me a ring when u can/want, my cell is [redacted]. I have class until 1230 but then im free! i will let the teacher she u will be there, shes a darling. Perhaps ill come to the end of the talk and meet you there […]

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Why a Harvard Professor Has Mixed Feelings When Students Take Jobs in Finance

from NYTs This is a bittersweet time on campus. Seniors are beginning to find jobs, and while their enthusiasm is infectious, some of their choices give me pause. Many of the best students are not going to research cancer, teach and inspire the next generation, or embark on careers in public service. Instead, large numbers are becoming traders, brokers and bankers. At Harvard in 2014, nearly one in five students who took a job went to finance. For economics majors, the number was closer to one in two. I can’t help wondering: Is this the best use of talent? Of course, […]

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LinkedIn’s CEO Thinks His $1.5B Buy Will Make You Smarter

from Wired ONLINE JOB-TRAINING SITE Lynda has built a library of more than 6,300 courses that teach business and technology skills from better navigating Excel to using design software. And now that library belongs to LinkedIn. The $1.5 billion acquisition, which is the largest in LinkedIn’s history, is part of CEO Jeff Weiner’s master plan to make LinkedIn not just a resume repository, but a place for professionals to manage their careers and, increasingly, learn new skills—especially in the world’s fastest-growing economies.  In the last year, LinkedIn has more than doubled its Chinese user base, but still only 9 million of […]

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Past Drug Charges Derail a Law Student’s Education

from NYTs David Powers came out of a drug rehabilitation program about 15 years ago hungry to swing his life in a significantly different direction. And that he did. He went back to college and graduated with a 3.9 grade point average. He was hired at a major accounting firm, worked in senior positions at three hedge funds, and was accepted to the law school at St. John’s University. Mr. Powers still calls the day of his arrest, when he was pulled off a destructive path, the “best day of my life.” Halfway through his coursework, while trying to get […]

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What Education Can and Can’t Do for Economic Inequality

from The Atlantic Would better education significantly reduce income inequality in America? No, says recent study from the Brookings Institution. But that doesn’t mean that better education wouldn’t help the overall economic picture. The study suggests that improving education does in fact help the economic situations of poorer Americans, even though it does little to whittle away at overall inequality in the country.   According to Melissa Kearney, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, “Increasing education isn’t going to do anything to bring down the wages of the real top—or address rising inequality focused on the 1 percent—but it is what’s […]

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The Hackathon Fast Track, From Campus to Silicon Valley

from NYTs Shariq Hashme squints at his laptop screen as he scrolls through hundreds of lines of computer code. “I can’t even make sense of it right now,” he says with a grimace. The long string of numbers, symbols and letters would usually be intelligible to Mr. Hashme, a 21-year-old computer science major at the University of Maryland, College Park, but at this moment, he’s having trouble even keeping his eyes open. In the last 27 hours, he has slept just two. It’s 2:37 a.m. on a Sunday, and he is toiling alongside 671 young software engineers who are camped […]

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How America’s Education Model Kills Creativity and Entrepreneurship

from Forbes The current model of education in the United States is stifling the creative soul of our children. While this is troubling for a variety of reasons, it also has significant economic consequences for the future of our country. America has long been unique because of its remarkable ingenuity, innovative capacity and entrepreneurial spirit. Yet over the last few decades, we have witnessed both a steady decline in the number of startups, as well as an increasing number of studies that suggest America’s education model fails to promote the kind of creativity, risk-taking, and problem solving skills necessary for entrepreneurship, […]

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The New Bachelor’s Payoff

from Inside Higher Ed Doubts about the labor-market returns of bachelor’s degrees, while never serious, can be put to rest. Last month’s federal jobs report showed a rock-bottom unemployment rate of 2.8 percent for workers who hold at least a four-year degree. The overall unemployment rate is 5.7 percent. But even that welcome economic news comes with wrinkles. A prominent financial analyst last week signaled an alarm that employers soon may face a shortage of job-seeking college graduates. And the employment report was a reminder of continuing worries about “upcredentialing” by employers, who are imposing new degree requirements on jobs. “Presumably, these educated workers are the […]

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Management in a Digital Economy

from Bits Blog “Business schools are a legacy industry that is trying to adapt to a digital world.” That is a quotation from Douglas M. Stayman, associate dean of Cornell Tech in New York, summing up an article published today. The challenge business schools face is a sign of the broader test of leadership and management across industry. It’s certainly taken time; technology transforms the economy less like a tidal wave than like a steadily rising tide. Yet by now, nearly every business is in good part a digital business. Take your pick — retailing, advertising, media, health care, finance, even farming. A […]

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Online Education Run Amok?

from Politico Massive open online courses, first envisioned as a way to democratize higher education, have made their way into high schools, but Washington is powerless to stop the flood of personal data about teenage students from flowing to private companies, thanks to loopholes in federal privacy laws. Universities and private companies this fall unveiled a slew of free, open-access online courses to high school students, marketing them as a way for kids to supplement their Advanced Placement coursework or earn a certificate of completion for a college-level class. But when middle and high school students participate in classes with […]

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