Google’s New Self-driving Cars Won’t Pave The Road To Freedom

from Daily Dot

I spend a lot of my life driving. Splitting time between Fort Bragg and the East Bay means that I often spend at least one day a week making the drive from one place to the other, in addition to the driving I do to get around when I’m at Home 1.0 or Home 2.0. I don’t put ridiculous amounts of mileage on my car, but I put on a fair amount—and more than that, I like driving. I like the curvy, beautiful roads that lead me from one home to another, the sense of peace I get while driving, the way I use it to process things I need to think about and address but might be feeling overwhelmed by in the world outside the bubble of my car.

As a frequent driver, I have to say that Google‘s recently unveiledself-driving car is, on the surface, a cool idea. There’s something sort of appealing about it—especially when I’m, say, picking someone up at the airport at 12:30am after working all day with the knowledge that I need to get up at 7am to talk with someone on the East Coast. Or for those times when I want to just zone out, or not deal with traffic, which tends to make me extremely, well, annoyed.

The cars have the potential to help people avoid cyclists (big bonus, and a growing issue in many necks of the woods, including my own) and could make driving safer and more efficient, a big concern in urban areas.

More here.

Posted in Innovation, Technology and tagged , , .

4 Comments

  1. Over a million people die each year from auto accidents. In the past few years, as a result of the number of traffic accidents plaguing the country. greater push has been made in the sphere of technology to make cars safer, drivers more aware, and accidents less likely to happen. In comparison to the countless bad behaviors a driver might exhibit behind the wheel, a computer is actually an ideal motorist. Since more than 90% of car crashes are the result of human error, the computer would take a lot of danger out of the equation entirely. various self-driving technologies have been developed by Google, Uber, Tesla, Nissan, and other major automakers, researchers, and technology companies. Most self-driving systems create and maintain an internal map of their surroundings, based on a wide array of sensors. There are no opportunities for a computer to be “distracted”, which is a leading cause of accidents in the United States at present. According to an American Automobile Association survey, Only 25% of Americans are comfortable with a car that drives itself. That’s a very small fraction of people who trust this technology compared to all the numbers of deaths happening from human errors. Giving all the efforts and all the research that is given to this technology I think people should give this technology a chance, especially that it ai
    ms to save lives and prevents accidents and bring the deaths toll down as much as possible

  2. Over a million people die each year from auto accidents. In the past few years, as a result of the number of traffic accidents plaguing the country. greater push has been made in the sphere of technology to make cars safer, drivers more aware, and accidents less likely to happen. In comparison to the countless bad behaviors a driver might exhibit behind the wheel, a computer is actually an ideal motorist. Since more than 90% of car crashes are the result of human error, the computer would take a lot of danger out of the equation entirely. various self-driving technologies have been developed by Google, Uber, Tesla, Nissan, and other major automakers, researchers, and technology companies. Most self-driving systems create and maintain an internal map of their surroundings, based on a wide array of sensors. There are no opportunities for a computer to be “distracted”, which is a leading cause of accidents in the United States at present. According to an American Automobile Association survey, Only 25% of Americans are comfortable with a car that drives itself. That’s a very small fraction of people who trust this technology compared to all the numbers of deaths happening from human errors. Giving all the efforts and all the research that is given to this technology I think people should give this technology a chance, especially that it aims to save lives and prevents accidents and bring the deaths toll down as much as possible

  3. This article was very intriguing and intuitive. There were a few ideas presented about Google’s self-driving cars that I would have never considered and some that I would have. For example, I am always conscious that Google finds ways to know people’s locations and routes due to their navigation systems and high tech servers. They even go so far as to incorporate “Home” on your Google maps if you have put in your addresses enough times. This is a reason that I do not think that I would trust a Google self driving car, as was said in the article. For one, it takes away even more privacy of being able drive the routes you want, when you ant and being able to navigate traffic, accidents, and such on your own personal account. With these self-driving cars, would we be able to find alternate routes or would this machine simply only go the way that it was programmed to go? I feel as though despite human errors, robots and computers can be very unpredictable as well.
    On the other side of this idea, a self-driving car could be useful for when people feel too exhausted to drive and have to travel somewhere, or to avoid small animals or people that we cannot see with the human eye. It may help us travel safer because we do not have to deal with those distractions (among others) by ourselves. Who knows these cars may be able to distinguish urban and rural areas just enough to help keep the people that demand for them the most prioritized.
    However, from my experience with just Google Maps, the automated voice is always trying to reroute me to get back to the original path that Google wants me to travel on, even before they realize that there’s no way for me to go that way. In one particular time, a friend and I got lost going somewhere that was in a more rural area and was lead to a dead end because the GPS could not track the side roads that it had us take. If Google Maps is so unpredictable, what’s to say the self-driving cars won’t be too?

  4. This article discusses an issue that seems to be more and more prominent in our world today. Even within just this decade, technology has advanced in a way that nobody had ever imagined. For example, advancements such as Tesla, the Ring doorbell, the use of AI and more all play significant roles in our daily lives now. The main purpose for inventing and developing such technologies was to better our style of living, but the question of whether or not our privacy is protected is one that will always be lingering in the back of our heads.
    Google has an invention of their self-driving car, soon to be a driver less car, that truly is incredible, but it is one that comes with a lot of uncertainty as well. As Smith questions in this article, do we sacrifice our own privacy if we use this technology by this established company? Since the car is owned by Google, the author brings up a good point of asking whether the company can now track where the car goes, where the owner’s home is, frequently visited places and more. This also does present the opportunity for police departments to potentially partner with Google to monitor their users’ driving behavior. It could be a whole other way of violating the people’s privacy.
    Another problem at hand would be the accuracy of Google Maps since that is what the vehicle would use to “drive itself”. Similar to Smith, I have also experienced inaccuracies with Maps where I knew something was wrong somewhere along the route, but Maps did not have that updated information in the system. If this is the case, the car that is being given directions with Maps would be completely misled with the wrong information due to the lack of recent updates. This would ultimately put the customers’ lives in danger while their safety should be the utmost priority.

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