Archive | Media

Five Steps To Avoid Election Misinformation

from News Literacy Project Nothing is more fundamental to democracy than information. It’s what we use to understand which issues are most important, and to assess which policies and political candidates are best suited to address those concerns. A democracy thrives when its citizens are informed and can wither when they are misled and deceived […]

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How Wikipedia’s Volunteers Became The Web’s Best Weapon Against Misinformation

from Fast Company For a few minutes near the end of his first presidential debate, Mike Bloomberg was dead. At 9:38 p.m. Eastern time, a Wikipedia user named DQUACK02 added some text to the Wikipedia page for the former Democratic presidential candidate and New York City mayor: “death_date   = {{Death date and age|2020|02|19|1942|02|14}}; |death_place  […]

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How To Create Your Very Own Crossword Puzzle

from McSweeney’s Recently, I got my very first crossword puzzle accepted by a real-life newspaper. Since this basically means that I’m a puzzle-making genius (and not, you know, super unqualified to write this kind of article), I thought I’d share some tips on how to make the best crossword puzzle ever. Enjoy! More here.

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Brett Kavanaugh And The Information Terrorists Trying To Reshape America

from Wired SINCE THE ADVENT of Donald Trump’s candidacy, there’s been a ton of focus on botnets and sockpuppets—automated and semiautomated social media accounts that use disinformation to manipulate public opinion. But the spotlight on bots has overshadowed the importance of the people who often initiate the flood and flow of information, and how the […]

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Our Hackable Political Future

from NYTs Imagine it is the spring of 2019. A bottom-feeding website, perhaps tied to Russia, “surfaces” video of a sex scene starring an 18-year-old Kirsten Gillibrand. It is soon debunked as a fake, the product of a user-friendly video application that employs generative adversarial network technology to convincingly swap out one face for another. […]

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Tackling the Internet’s Central Villain: The Advertising Business

from NYTs Pretend you are the lead detective on a hit new show, “CSI: Terrible Stuff on the Internet.” In the first episode, you set up one of those crazy walls plastered with headlines and headshots, looking for hidden connections between everything awful that’s been happening online recently. There’s a lot of dark stuff. In […]

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The Fake-News Fallacy

from The New Yorker On the evening of October 30, 1938, a seventy-six-year-old millworker in Grover’s Mill, New Jersey, named Bill Dock heard something terrifying on the radio. Aliens had landed just down the road, a newscaster announced, and were rampaging through the countryside. Dock grabbed his double-barrelled shotgun and went out into the night, […]

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The Alternative Facts of Cable Companies

from Backchannel Cable companies have bad reputations for customer service, and sometimes they rename themselves to divert attention and get a fresh start. Comcast’s “Xfinity” rebranding in 2010 has now been followed by Charter’s renaming of itself—after a megamerger with Time Warner Cable last year—as “Spectrum.” But changing your name doesn’t mean that you aren’t liable […]

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