Archive | Ethics

Inside The Bizarre World of Internet Trolls and Propagandists

from TED Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they’re making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation […]

Continue Reading 4

The College Admission Conspiracy Is Education’s Madoff Moment

from Forbes The scope, scale and cunning of the college admission conspiracy that has embroiled more than 50 elites, including Hollywood stars Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman, CEOs, prominent lawyers and others, is nothing short of higher education’s Bernie Madoff moment. Madoff, a crestfallen Wall Street investment titan spent more than 30 years “besting” the […]

Continue Reading 26

Do You Have a Moral Duty to Leave Facebook?

from NYTs I joined Facebook in 2008, and for the most part, I have benefited from being on it. Lately, however, I have wondered whether I should delete my Facebook account. As a philosopher with a special interest in ethics, I am using “should” in the moral sense. That is, in light of recent events […]

Continue Reading 25

Apple’s Use of Face Recognition in the New iPhone: Implications

from ACLU Apple unveiled its new iPhone X Tuesday, and it will include extensive face recognition capabilities. Face recognition (as I have discussed) is one of the more dangerous biometrics from a privacy standpoint, because it can be leveraged for mass tracking across society. But Apple has a proven record of achieving widespread acceptance for […]

Continue Reading 29

UNC Presses Attack on Whistle-Blower in Fake Classes Scandal

from BW.com With the $16 billion college sports industry under siege from lawsuits and player-unionization efforts, one academic scandal—at the Chapel Hill campus of the University of North Carolina—has come to represent key aspects of the debate about Division 1 football and basketball players. In response, UNC’s top leadership continues to try to deflect attention from widespread […]

Continue Reading 25

Cybercrime Pays, and More Lessons From HP’s Hacking Contest

from BW.com Hacking is a solitary business, furtive and dimly lit by the glow of a computer screen, at least in the popular imagination. Not so the semiannual competition known as Pwn2Own, organized by Hewlett-Packard’s (HPQ) Zero Day Initiative (ZDI), where teams gather to demonstrate “exploits,” the insider term for using security vulnerabilities in Web browsers and video streaming […]

Continue Reading 19

In Fake Classes Scandal, UNC Fails Its Athletes — and Whistle-Blower

from BW.com Sitting in Memorial Hall at the heart of the Chapel Hill campus of the University of North Carolina, Mary Willingham wondered what William Friday would want her to do. Friday’s memorial service in October 2012 drew a large and reverent audience: scholars of the humanities and sciences, national political figures, and university staff […]

Continue Reading 102

People Can Be Tricked into Reversing Their Opinions on Morality

from Scientific American People can be tricked into reversing their opinions on moral issues, even to the point of constructing good arguments to support the opposite of their original positions, researchers report today in PLoS ONE. The researchers, led by Lars Hall, a cognitive scientist at Lund University in Sweden, recruited 160 volunteers to fill out […]

Continue Reading 15