Archive | Ethics

Do You Have a Moral Duty to Leave Facebook?

from NYTs I joined Facebook in 2008, and for the most part, I have benefited from being on it. Lately, however, I have wondered whether I should delete my Facebook account. As a philosopher with a special interest in ethics, I am using “should” in the moral sense. That is, in light of recent events […]

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Apple’s Use of Face Recognition in the New iPhone: Implications

from ACLU Apple unveiled its new iPhone X Tuesday, and it will include extensive face recognition capabilities. Face recognition (as I have discussed) is one of the more dangerous biometrics from a privacy standpoint, because it can be leveraged for mass tracking across society. But Apple has a proven record of achieving widespread acceptance for […]

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UNC Presses Attack on Whistle-Blower in Fake Classes Scandal

from BW.com With the $16 billion college sports industry under siege from lawsuits and player-unionization efforts, one academic scandal—at the Chapel Hill campus of the University of North Carolina—has come to represent key aspects of the debate about Division 1 football and basketball players. In response, UNC’s top leadership continues to try to deflect attention from widespread […]

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Cybercrime Pays, and More Lessons From HP’s Hacking Contest

from BW.com Hacking is a solitary business, furtive and dimly lit by the glow of a computer screen, at least in the popular imagination. Not so the semiannual competition known as Pwn2Own, organized by Hewlett-Packard’s (HPQ) Zero Day Initiative (ZDI), where teams gather to demonstrate “exploits,” the insider term for using security vulnerabilities in Web browsers and video streaming […]

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In Fake Classes Scandal, UNC Fails Its Athletes — and Whistle-Blower

from BW.com Sitting in Memorial Hall at the heart of the Chapel Hill campus of the University of North Carolina, Mary Willingham wondered what William Friday would want her to do. Friday’s memorial service in October 2012 drew a large and reverent audience: scholars of the humanities and sciences, national political figures, and university staff […]

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People Can Be Tricked into Reversing Their Opinions on Morality

from Scientific American People can be tricked into reversing their opinions on moral issues, even to the point of constructing good arguments to support the opposite of their original positions, researchers report today in PLoS ONE. The researchers, led by Lars Hall, a cognitive scientist at Lund University in Sweden, recruited 160 volunteers to fill out […]

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Two Sides of the Same Coin?

from BuzzMachine At two privacy conferences—one in New York, the other right now in Victoria, B.C.—I’ve watched the growth of privacy’s regulatory/industrial complex and seen its strategy in action: scare, then sell. Yesterday, before I spoke at the Reboot conference, the privacy commissioner for the province, Elizabeth Denham, got up to demonize the social net and its […]

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Stock-Hedging Lets Bankers Skirt Efforts to Overhaul Pay

from NYTs Intent on fixing a banking system that contributed heavily to the recent financial crisis, lawmakers and regulators pushed Wall Street to overhaul its pay practices. Big banks responded by shifting more compensation into stock, a move intended to align employees’ interests more closely with those of investors and discourage excessive risk-taking. But it […]

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