Author Archive | Professor Shannon

How to Do a Data ‘Cleanse’

from NYTs If we need a checkup on our health, our finances or our cars, we can find doctors, accountants or mechanics. But who checks up on our digital lives? There’s no such thing as 10,000-mile scheduled maintenance for your hard drive or an oil change for your smartphone. You’re on your own. Some people […]

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How To Create Your Very Own Crossword Puzzle

from McSweeney’s Recently, I got my very first crossword puzzle accepted by a real-life newspaper. Since this basically means that I’m a puzzle-making genius (and not, you know, super unqualified to write this kind of article), I thought I’d share some tips on how to make the best crossword puzzle ever. Enjoy! More here.

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Where Did The Moon Come From? A New Theory

from TED The Earth and Moon are like identical twins, made up of the exact same materials — which is really strange, since no other celestial bodies we know of share this kind of chemical relationship. What’s responsible for this special connection? Looking for an answer, planetary scientist and MacArthur “Genius” Sarah T. Stewart discovered […]

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Apple And Stanford Medicine Announce Full Results From Apple Watch Heart Study

from 9to5 Mac Apple and Stanford Medicine today announced the results of the Apple Heart Study. The study enrolled over 400,000 participants, making it the “largest study ever of its kind,” according to Apple. The findings were presented in New Orleans this morning. The goal of the study, Apple says, was to evaluate Apple Watch’s […]

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Capturing Intent Is The Only Way To Future-Proof Your Products

from Forbes Product design has always been about a geometry – all design software starts that way. New tools, such as nTologopy’s new Field model, promise change. In doing so, they can help make corporations more agile, prevent product obsolescence and bring about distributed manufacturing. Manufacturers and product developers are facing both increased pressure to […]

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What Every VPN Provider Is Missing

from Fast Company I don’t know a lot about security, but I do know that when I use public Wi-Fi—whether on my phone, tablet, or laptop—I should be protecting my traffic with a virtual private network. For those unfamiliar with VPNs, the concept is basically that you use a simple piece of software to open […]

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Stamps Featuring Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci

from kottke The Royal Mail in the UK have released a set of stamps that feature drawings done by Leonardo da Vinci. The Royal Collection holds the greatest collection of Leonardo’s drawings in existence, housed in the Print Room at Windsor Castle. Because they have been protected from light, fire and flood, they are in […]

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No, Data Is Not The New Oil

from Wired “Data is the new oil” is one of those deceptively simple mantras for the modern world. Whether in The New York Times, The Economist, or WIRED, the wildcatting nature of oil exploration, plus the extractive exploitation of a trapped asset, seems like an apt metaphor for the boom in monetized data. The metaphor […]

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Why R.B.G. Matters

from NYTs For the judicial icon otherwise known as R.B.G., Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s past few roller-coaster months have included being lionized by Hollywood, laid low by cancer surgery, and most recently issuing one of the Supreme Court term’s more important decisions, placing limits on civil forfeiture, within a day of returning to the bench. […]

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On Feeling Incompetent

from Seth’s Blog At some point, grown ups get tired of the feeling that accompanies growth and learning. We start calling that feeling, “incompetence.” We’re not good at the new software, we resist a brainstorming session for a new way to solve a problem, we never did bother to learn to juggle… Not because we […]

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Mapping the Odyssey Isn’t Easy

from kottke We’ve looked before at maps of Odysseus’s travels in The Odyssey (as Jason wrote in 2018, “that dude was LOST”). But it turns out — and maybe this shouldn’t be surprising — that it’s not easy to figure out exactly where Odysseus was in the Mediterranean Sea for all that time. Scholars have […]

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Awarding Punitive Damages Against Foreign States Is Dangerous and Counterproductive

from Lawfare The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia held recently that Syria is liable for the death of American war correspondent Marie Colvin and awarded Colvin’s family $302.5 million—$2.5 million in compensatory damages and $300 million in punitive damages. Colvin was killed in Syria when President Bashar Assad’s forces bombed the Baba […]

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The Alarming Scope of the President’s Emergency Powers

from The Atlantic In the weeks leading up to the 2018 midterm elections, President Donald Trump reached deep into his arsenal to try to deliver votes to Republicans. Most of his weapons were rhetorical, featuring a mix of lies and false inducements—claims that every congressional Democrat had signed on to an “open borders” bill (none […]

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