The Right Way to Fix Universities

from NYTs

Tax universities? The unthinkable is now a live possibility. Congressional plans to tax the endowments of wealthy private schools and the tuition benefits of graduate students have elicited outrage from universities and schadenfreude from Trump supporters. Missing in this outcry — and in the pending tax legislation — is a recognition of the long history of reciprocity between academia and government that has incalculably benefited society.

The nation’s founders nourished great aspirations for higher learning and pined for a research university in the European mold rather than the British. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were so desperate to do this that they considered transplanting Switzerland’s Genevan Academy wholesale to the nascent United States.

The economic and military demands of the Civil War finally presented the conditions for us to establish versions of a European-style university in America. To fund them, the government offered a quid pro quo in which universities were granted federal money and exemption from direct oversight in exchange for providing a service to society. The Morrill Act of 1862 charged the so-called land-grant universities to “promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes.”

The nationwide introduction of tax exemption for both private and public universities in the early-20th-century tax code formalized this reciprocity. The sad irony is that while political leaders fought hard for universities years ago, their latter-day counterparts now seek to dismantle them.

The deal between universities and government now on the table was negotiated in the years after World War II, when American pride in military victory commingled with anxiety over how to manage the stateside return of millions of soldiers. The result was the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, popularly known as the G.I. Bill, which would eventually send more than two million veterans to college and remake the American class structure. In a single generation, college access was transformed from an option only for the affluent and a minority of industrious students into a broadly accessible avenue of social mobility.

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29 Responses to The Right Way to Fix Universities

  1. Jimmy Bedoya December 1, 2017 at 5:39 pm #

    The essence of academia is to help society excel in a social, intellectual, and economic manner. By educating the youth, the future can consist of endless amounts of success in all forms. The youth will in return lead and teach their youth, formulating a newly found link of success in the many years to come, completely changing the fate of an individual and most importantly the society. In America, the founders pushed an idea to mold an educational system that reflected that of the British and almost took into consideration the possibility of bringing the famous Genevan Academy to the United States. After the civil war an environment demonstrating the potential to place a European-style university motivated the government to make an offer that granted federal money to universities and exemption from direct oversight in return of establishing a service to society. This service to society would be developing a generation of intelligent individuals to benefit the United States in every aspect. The Morrill Act of 1862 gave land-grants to universities in an effort to assist them in the promotion of liberal and practical education of the industrial classes. In the early 20th century, there was an introduction of tax exemption for private and public universities. This introduction, however, was short-lived in the sense that after World War 2, America was looking for a way to readjust the lives of soldiers after they came back home. Thus, as a result, America passed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944. To help soldiers who came back to be put through college. From this point on is where the increase in college students surpassed the amount of federal aid available for people. The government of the country as well of the government of every state started putting a stop to the aid they were given college students. In an effort to replace the declining government assistance, administrators started increasing college tuition. Now the issue resides in the sense that college is becoming unaffordable for everyone and only affordable to the kids of rich backgrounds.

    The author strongly suggests that this should not be the case and instead of a question of what good and service can be derived from sending kids, regardless of upbringing, to get a college education. With this question can be the determination of granting aid for the social welfare of American citizens let alone humanity. To tax students can be seen as a destructive manner for the fact that it puts a restriction on the capability of America excelling in scientific discovery and potential of an educated public. I agree with the author in the sense that universities should be able to convince donors to donate to students so that there can be a future of Americans that aspire both financially and mentally. An educated public is great for not only the individual but for the welfare of the public. If the Labor and Education Departments could create grants that will be established off competitive grounds could help universities deliver training programs to people who are most affected by financial issues and find themselves in low-income environments. If only the privileged can go to college, it in a sense restricts America from finding its true geniuses and humble, resilient leaders.

  2. Shiyun Ye December 1, 2017 at 8:17 pm #

    As we all know, higher learning in United States is always been encouraged although many people choose to drop out of it. Still, there are a large number of population who wants to get better educations and especially, with less tuition. However, the decision initiated by Congress recently that they plan to tax the endowments of wealthy private schools and the tuition benefits of graduate students have greatly impact this group pf people. Before this initiation had brought up, the cost of a four-year degree has already increased so much that typically a family has to mortgage their future finance to support their children or even the child himself or herself has to go for a huge amount of student loan. With this crude, destructive mechanism for extracting goods from academia would diminish both scientific discovery and the size and scope of the educated public that has been improving United States for generations. There already exist three major problems in the educational area, which are the soaring costs, educational inequality and school’s resistance to change. Nonetheless, with the idea of taxing tuition benefits, it does not solve even single one of these questions.
    Moreover, with the change of taxing policy in universities, they have to think about new proposals to attract more students than before. They can reserve their models but the wealthy families would be a much better target and the priority, or they can look for people who never have the idea of coming to college. Apparently, for the case of saving energy and cost, the first method seems more reasonable. However, it may strength the problem of education inequality, which already exist for a long time. Furthermore, another great idea is promoting as many online courses as possible. These online courses can for the working classes who are willing to take a few more certifications and do not mind to contribute their salaries. From a positive aspect of this initiation, it forces the university to commit to what they should be doing – education, but people are smart enough to find a way to slack off. Therefore, as mentioned before, finding elite families could become these universities’ priorities, which create more unfairness in the area. The universities can also cut down the investing for the science and research projects so that they can save more money or to decrease the salary of their employees even professors. It may occur the low quality of education and low involvement from both students and faculties.
    In the end, this new initiated policy has its own reason, which is to increase the universities involvement on education area because most of them do not seem like they are doing this. However, as discussed, the disadvantages seem more then the advantages if the policy really come out. The worst can be another round of increasing college tuition, which can easily destroy the current already fragile determination of people who wants to get a better education. The congress needs to think through the choice again.

  3. Vincent Scorese December 8, 2017 at 6:06 pm #

    Everyone can agree on the fact that higher education is a very good and important way for us not only as a country but as a population to progress into the future. It has been practiced for years not how parents and grandparents insist their children or grandchildren to apply for college and continue their education at a university. I remember as a child always being told to make sure my grades were good and one day apply for college and become something one day from graduation. I’m happy for that upbringing. However, everyone is very aware of the cost of college and the cost of trying to increase that higher education. The cost has continuously rose year after year from universities getting away from charging students extreme amounts of money for tuition and those associated with it. Everyone can agree that the price for college is getting out of control with the fact that student debt has outgrown credit card debt and that’s saying a lot. College has been argued for a long time whether or not it is kind of sham with how they make students take 2 extra years of introductory courses that most seem useless. There has to be something done about the cost of college by making it less and that is where as Americans but also individuals we will disagree or have different opinions on how we could accomplish that with as little issues as possible. The way the government feels right now is to tax these institutions and the graduate benefits the were receiving form these universities. I’m not one hundred percent sure on what is going to come of the plan but it is an attempt to try and lower the cost of universities from the perspective of the government and its leaders so we will truly just have to wait and see what really comes of the taxing of the private universities that charge a crazy amount of money for tuition. I hope that it lowers the amount they charge, not only for me but also for future generations to come behind me. Taxing might make them increase the amount they charge.

  4. zonghao li December 8, 2017 at 9:00 pm #

    One of the aspects that could definitely use regulation is the academia world, where there are important issues of rising costs and massive student debt. As government pulls funds and control from universities and other institutions of higher education, schools given free reign to enforce their agenda. Unfortunately, the general trend[a] seems to be that the school’s policy direction is diverging from the original intention, which is to provide quality education. Instead, modern educational institutions compete with each other[b] to secure more students. One way of doing this is to build more and more buildings to provide a better image of grandeur. However, among all these new construction projects we need to ask ourselves where to draw the line between the university’s prestige and the quality of education given. We need to ask the question: how are these recreational and academics progressing the student’s learning?
    While many universities can continue to splurge because of their prestige and the increasing importance of a college degree, other less renowned universities[c] are having a hard time trying to keep up with the spending habits of their more prestigious counterparts. Or as Thomas H. Powell, Mt. St. Mary’s University president, puts it, “we borrowed a lot of money, but we had no choice, I wasn’t going to watch the buildings fall down.”
    Perhaps what this means is that the government needs to step in. With increased regulation and someone to look over the schools’ shoulders, at the very least the rampant tuition growth can be somewhat mitigated. One way can be to differentiate between the colleges that provide quality education, colleges that actually provide a public good. For example, there were lawsuits [d]concerning the legitimacy and ethical nature of for profit universities such as Trump University. Among concerns of whether or not for profit universities provide quality education are questions of ethical business practices such as enrolling students in courses that provide course material as advertised and permitting students who want to transfer out the appropriate credits for their work in the for profit college.
    In light of these controversial policies, I strongly believe that a system that promotes incentives to provide quality education through tax benefits would greatly alleviate the problem of outrageous tuition costs and stagnant if not downgrading education quality. As Congress discusses its new tax plan, they can allow universities that provide quality education to receive tax benefits while other universities, especially for profit universities, can be taxed. This way, both the US government and the students win; the US government gets more tax revenue while students enjoy better education.
    In our capitalistic society, incentive is the name of the game. Without government regulation, universities could just do whatever they want and unfortunately that means enforcing their own agendas which is to make the universities bigger to attract more students and more money. However, if there is some monetary incentive for universities to do their jobs, I’m sure we will see the trend shift because money is the lifeline needed to keep the universities running. Depending on how lenient Congress is, or rather, how politically feasible it is, the aforementioned tax penalty on colleges that don’t provide quality education can be closed down. Thus, in an ideal world, only the universities receiving tax benefits and maybe a few universities that remains even without receiving tax benefits remain to exist. Of course, as a policy this will be very hard to be approved political-wise, and there are also enforcement problems of the accuracy of regulatory agencies to determine the quality of education and who gets the tax benefits.
    In the end, it might not even be feasible. However, I still stand by my statement that providing incentives to better education quality and disincentives to bad education qualities will greatly alleviate the problem. In our capitalistic world, we are to a large extent free to do what we want, and if there are incentives to help push us a certain way, we will certainly see a new trend.

  5. zonghao li December 8, 2017 at 9:22 pm #

    i s

  6. Jerry Wu January 22, 2018 at 10:42 pm #

    As most of us know, higher education in the United States has always been looked highly upon, and it is encouraged as well. However, in the more recent years, students have either been finding other job alternatives or choosing to drop out, or they drop out because of failing grades and a very low income. The cost of a 4-year college degree has risen so much; the more and more people have begun to suffer in poverty, low-income, and other financial issues. During the past several years, people within the U.S. Government have been tirelessly looking for ways to reduce college tuitions, or get rid of it altogether, knowing in the back of their minds that the U.S. National Debt continues to rapidly rise every day. With the increasing education inequality and towns resisting to change tradition, it makes solving these issues even more complicated than people intended it to be.
    From a personal standpoint, I was always told as a little boy to always try my very best and to keep up my grades, which has benefited me to this day. However, I am not a person who struggles to find money, which means I will most likely find greater opportunities in the work force. The more I appreciate the fact that I am lucky enough to have a college education, the more I understand that having a job opportunity is a blessing; and if somehow, more people find were given opportunities, the world will most certainly be a better place to live.

  7. Zachary Corby January 25, 2018 at 4:25 pm #

    The government has long ignored the academia world and it needs to stop. Tuition rates continue to grow annually and student debt nationally is already in the trillions of dollars. I enjoyed how the article pointed out the relationship between the government and the academia world throughout our history. From the earliest stages of our nation’s birth higher education was a priority and helped individuals and society as a whole grow. According to the article, Adams and Jefferson were so interested in setting up higher education in America that they wanted to transplant the whole entire Genevan Academy in Switzerland. Have you ever taken a moment to think about how little our nation cares about college? Did you read the part of the article where it said that the outline of the ties between government and college stem from the Cold War and even World War 2? The Cold War ended in 1991 meaning at best the last time the government really took an interest in college was when gas still cost around $1 a gallon. Regardless of how you slice it the government needs to take a more active role in its ties to colleges and universities.

    So the question that now arises is what does the government need to do in order to help the academia world? The article brings up a lot about taxing universities, which in theory would not really help anyone except for the government. If they decide to impose any taxes on colleges and universities I can almost guarantee that schools will make up for it by raising tuitions even higher. Raising taxes would hurt students even more and go farther away from a solution. Interestingly enough candidates in the latest presidential election like Bernie Sanders and Hilary Clinton brought up the idea of having free college. While that idea seems nice on the outside since the word “free” is in there clearly this would never work. In order to have free college taxes would have to be raised on everyone in order to compensate universities now. The government in turn would also most likely have to lay out a certain amount of funding each year that would keep increasing the embarrassment that is our national debt. A decent amount of people may be willing to have their taxes increased if it was for something as important as universities. However, many people may be apprehensive about who that money is really going to. Not all of the tax money is going to be going to superstar kids in and out of the classroom; a lot will likely be going to kids who cruised through high school not really trying, but still are entitled to free college. On another note, making college free also levels the playing field for everyone, which will make it harder for people to separate themselves to get meaningful jobs. That is one place where actually paying the money for college and going into debt actually works.

    My personal opinion on how to solve this is for the government to set a price ceiling on all universities. This will help to limit the debt that students have to endure after they graduate. This will also put universities on a budget so that they can stop spending resources in places that do not need to be spent. For example at Seton Hall they just made a huge new building as a welcome center. This is because they want to try to impress as many people as possible to come plunge into over $100,000 of debt at their school. A price ceiling will help to stop the arms race between schools all over the country. Students will finally be able to get into the higher educational schools based solely on merit and not whether or not they have enough money. I also think the government could help to lower interest rates on student loans as well to help. The government may never be able to fully fix universities as the article says, but there are certainly things it could do to help, and they have to at least try.

  8. Daniel Colasanto January 25, 2018 at 9:56 pm #

    Education gives us knowledge and develops in us a perspective of looking at life. It also allows the transition from natural thinking to critical thinking which is much more powerful and productive. An educated person has the ability to differentiate between right and wrong or good and evil. It is the foremost responsibility of a society to educate its citizens. With that being said it is very important to me that the government and state legislature be in favor for funding public and private institutions and not tax universities or tax the endowments of private institutions. We need to ask the question: how are these recreational and academics progressing the student’s learning? I believe that universities should receive tax breaks for providing low cost tuition. As the article states, “we need to start asking which public goods universities are producing and whether government support get Americans more of them.” In my opinion the government taxing universities is a destructive mechanism because they are taking away money from the future entrepreneurs, lawyers, doctors, engineers, teachers, scientists, etc of the future. Many of which can not afford a college education without financial assistance and federal grants.
    Also to address these issues the government and colleges both need to come to the table and discuss how to equally benefit keeping in mind the best social interest and social outcome of the entire country as a whole. I feel that if necessary school’s should be put under minimum government regulation because that’s when free market competition ceases to progress. In addition, let’s say a school would have to increase the funding they offer to grad students to entice them to apply, which they can’t do because the current administration is cutting finding for the university sources of government funding. This means that one, either students will be paid less, so only the children of the wealthy will be able to afford grad school, or two, universities will increase funding but decrease the intake of students. For the past two decades students been taking advantage of and it isn’t fair. All in all, the only way to make the future a better and more innovative place is by investing in the youth and giving as many students as possible the shot at a college education.

  9. Lauren Woodward January 26, 2018 at 3:11 pm #

    Every student who applies to a university already knows what they’re getting into financially. Whether that be they’re on scholarship or paying in full, finance is a major concept to a college education. Academia in our modern day society is so crucial to the development of the current generation, as without it not much can be done. With a tax on universities, how will our society fluctuate in terms of university attendance and employment after college? It seems as though that a tax on expensive universities will not only decrease attendance, but also discourage applicants and result in inequality of academics based on income.
    By taxing universities, the government is essentially enforcing the idea that college is no longer a standard in society; it is a privilege. Only those that are wealthy will be able to achieve a higher education, while others that cannot afford it are left out. Financial aid, I’ve found, is quite difficult to achieve and seems impossible for most. By raising the price of tuition, colleges will not only distribute unequal academic opportunities, but will have to achieve a new level of attractiveness, where they must find creative incentives to pull potential applicants in. Just displaying pens at a college fair and a free book bag at the accepted student events will not cut it if taxes are going to be applied. One can infer that new and creative incentive actions will be costly, and therefore prices will rise in addition to the tax. This brings issue for not only for the university, but for the student as well in finding the right choice of school for them. Additionally, most students will wonder if the high price tag and tax are even worth the education being bestowed upon them. Therefore, the want and need for a higher education becomes insignificant.
    Students shouldn’t have to base their choice of school, and ultimately their future, off of price; they should be able to decide based on the academic opportunity and overall opinion on the university itself. I am fortunate enough to be able to afford great tuition, but in my hometown there are many individuals that cannot even afford the community college there. I feel that government regulation and taxing universities will not only diminish the attractiveness of receiving a higher education, but also discourage future generations from embarking on the experience and journey college takes them on.

  10. Daniel Schreier January 26, 2018 at 5:49 pm #

    Every government should have as one of its mains priorities, a comprehensive educational system that drives for excellence. These start from early elementary education, to higher education in universities undergraduate and graduate programs. The government should invest and give opportunities to its citizens so in the future they can be able to make a difference in society. However, education, like pretty much everything now, is a market and, especially higher education is a big deal, since a full 4 years tuition can cost well above $100,000.00, which is not affordable for the majority of the United States population. Thus, financial aid and scholarships, especially endowment ones, which are given by alumni of the university, so other students can have the same opportunities as they had, are becoming more and more important. However, the government is now studying a plan of taxing those scholarships, ignoring the relation between Universities and the government that has given a huge benefit for society, since its inception. Thanks to Academia research, projects and their mission, society has seen innumerous benefits in all areas of knowledge. We can cite for example, how much research is been done to prevent and combat many different daisies, such as cancer. In current days, chances of curing cancer skyrocketed, if one compares from 50 years ago, this was largely due to research and work from universities all over the country and the world. Now, many of these people, which conducted this, amount of research probably did not had the financial conditions to attend those institutions, and were only able to do it since they had some sort of financial aid, which had a large chance of being endowment scholarships. Besides, education is the biggest investment one can make into another person, which would definitely change its live and the lives of many others. Still, there needs to be a way that both parties- the government, which needs more funding, and the Academic community, so it can continue its mission and legacy- are satisfied. The way which would be more efficient is if any educational activity, regardless of the field of study, wouldn’t be subject to taxation at all, but other non-educational activities related to the educational organization’s structure, such as employee tax, or other sorts of administrative duty, should be taxed. This is a similar way of what is happening now, but would maybe resolve this conflict. After all, education is a person’s largest asset, and good-educated people make a better society, country and planet.

    Source: https://www.aau.edu/sites/default/files/AAU%20Files/Key%20Issues/Taxation%20%26%20Finance/Tax-Exempt-Status-of-Universities-FINAL.pdf

  11. Alexis Candelora January 26, 2018 at 5:58 pm #

    Through decades of American history, the prospect of higher education has been the dream of many. It offers a better chance of employment and monetary success for many ambitious college attendees. Not only is it beneficial for individuals across the nation, but it benefits the country to have well educated workers. These educated graduates have the opportunity to become doctors, engineers, and more. They are given the opportunity to advance and maintain American society with their knowledge. However, if the government were to enforce a tax on the already expensive tuition fees, it would damage the number of college applicants as they wouldn’t be able to afford the additional costs. This would cause outrage as it would contradict previously instated bills, such as the GI Bill, and the promise of accessible higher education for the majority as opposed to primarily the affluent. This contradiction also torments the American Dream of an equal opportunity to a successful future as the gateways to many well-regarded careers, such as a doctor or lawyer, result from years of college education.
    One might consider the implication of taxes would only increase the incentive to pursue studies and lessen the number of drop-outs due to the greater financial obligation placed upon them. However, the act would lessen the amount of dedicated students who wish to apply but are unable to accommodate the tuition fees with the additional taxes. Thus, resulting in unequal opportunities for all. Therefore, the consequences of such an act as to place taxes on higher education would be against the American Dream and contradictory to previous government promises through acts such as the GI Bill. Hence, the plans to proceed with the act should be abolished to preserve equal access and the benefits guaranteed by the future success of the ambitious students.

  12. John Mundia January 26, 2018 at 6:04 pm #

    Throughout the years the soaring costs of public and private universities have been the source of a large amount of debt in this nation. Students who have never worked a day in their lives to some extent take on thousands and thousands of dollars in debt. The ability for students to have access to cheaper education is crucial. I think that over the past few years there has been an enormous amount of finger pointing between universities, and the federal government. That has to stop in order for more people to afford college. The universities and the federal government have to work together in order to come up with a solution.

    The article in the New York Times suggests that the government has been thinking about taxing education. This is a horrible solution to the problem because even more people will not be able to afford college. Not being able to afford college hinders the population from being educated and that hinders the economy from growing. The taxing of universities will have disastrous and all most irreversible results.

    According to Harvard Magazine, the results and sheer impracticality of all this is outline in this piece: https://www.harvardmagazine.com/2017/11/taxing-university-endowments .

  13. Alan Josefsek January 26, 2018 at 7:10 pm #

    There are many problems with universities today including but definitely not limited to: funding, the ability to release students into the professional world and function properly, incident reporting and safety on many campuses, lack of support for most entrepreneurs, and many others. Perhaps the most devastating of these in the second one listed. There are many instances in which students upon graduation are unable to compete successfully. One of the main reasons I believe this occurs is for the fact that many students do not apply themselves to their respective tasks. This can be blamed on entitlement. If you speak to most foreign students, they will tell you that most Americans are ungrateful for their college experiences. Their distaste for this is understandable, due in part to the fact that many come from much less fortunate places; places in which a college degree is almost unheard-of to acquire. In previous decades, the college experience was only for those qualified; people who were willing to go above and beyond the call of duty to accomplish their life goals. Today however, you need a college degree to have even the slightest chance to become slightly successful. American students take college for granted because now everybody goes. If every student that went to college today would take it seriously and not for granted, I believe the world would be in a much better place. One day, a doctoral degree is going to be the normal route to take in order to become something such as a nurse or even a financial advisor. I am not saying that college is in any way wrong or not everybody should attend, I am simply saying that people who decide to go to college should take it much more seriously than they do now. If this was the case, I believe that people would come to realize that it is not the universities fault for their failure to succeed; it is in fact their own. I am currently beginning a business that take up almost every minute of every day. The work never stops and when you think you are finished, more appears out of thin air. You do not need a college degree to begin a business, but I chose this path to educate myself more and meet other entrepreneurs with similar interests. That is how I met my current business partner Aurora. I laugh when people tell me that when I was considering dropping out of college I would never accomplish anything in my life. I am fortunate enough to not need a college degree to survive; only to supplement information and management I have learned through my own trial and error. If people took the jump to financial independence at a young age, many people would not be in the positions they are in today. Therefore, adding taxes to university endowments is not the reason universities are flawed. It’s the way in which they teach us to work for somebody else for the remainder of our lives. 95 percent of people work hard to make the other 5 percent’s better. Don’t be on the wrong side of this statistic.

  14. Luis F Gonzalez Jr January 30, 2018 at 5:49 pm #

    Whenever I hear taxes, I think it has a bad connotation. Less money in my pockets means less spending because of my lower purchasing power. That is the same thought these “wealthy” private universities are thinking about because of the vague details of the tax. I cannot agree or disagree with this taxing idea because I do not know the qualifications of being a “wealthy” private university, how big the tax is, and if the university will be able to function with the same prestige and efficiency. Taxing these private universities could be looked at as taxing private companies and could be a possibility if passed by Congress.
    The requirements to be considered a “wealthy” private school are endowments larger than $250,000 per full time student. The tax is being considered to be around 1.4% on all endowments which does not seem much but could be a big hit for certain universities. Let take Seton Hall University as an example. If they offered endowments to all of their 5,956 undergraduate students who pay roughly an amount of $40,588 (total amount $241, 742,128) annually, $3,384,389.79 would go to taxes. This is not a big number to worry about in my opinion and would not change the atmosphere Seton Hall University offers but might affect the size of faculty or other things. The big parts that make Seton Hall great probably will not change but certain unnoticeable things will change and these small changes could pile up and become a huge financial and business problem in the future.
    If the tax remains small, I will agree with it but if it becomes bigger and harms the university economically then the tax is unjust. The federal government should promote education not dismantle the opportunity for students to attend. Most of these private universities are the best universities in the nation and world. Society benefits from them and need to be maintained and promoted. Communities around these universities have higher wages and business around private research universities receive more patents and investment more money in technology and research.
    The tax may have negative effects to it. It could deter students from wanting to go to college because of the smaller amounts of financial assistance they will receive. Less money given in endowments means more money from their own pockets when paying tuition which negatively incentivizes individuals to not go to school or find a cheaper option of academia. These financially weaker counterparts do not offer the same experience and opportunities from “wealthier” private schools and could weaken our labor force. There are many variables that play here but the most important thing is that education is to be preserved not destroyed.

    Sources:
    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/30/gop-college-endowment-tax-wont-just-hurt-the-ivy-league.html
    https://www.petersons.com/articles/college-types/public-university-vs-private
    https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/seton-hall-university-new-jersey-2632

  15. Daniel Kim February 1, 2018 at 7:09 pm #

    According to National Center for Education Statistics, the tuition cost for a four-year, private and public institutions rose from $11,548 in 1984-1985 to $25,409 in 2014-2015. Overall, the price of a college degree increased significantly over last few decades. Despite the increasing education expense, many Americans believe that a college education is a worthwhile investment for the future. According to the same institute, “some 20.4 million students are expected to attend American colleges and universities…” in fall 2017. Although a college degree provides economic opportunities, the situation shows the current reality of receiving a college education. As technology is rapidly advancing with self-driving cars and factory automated workers, many colleges are struggling to teach their students relevant and reliable skills needed in the workforce. At the same time, the U.S. education system is still heavily reliant on the traditional methods of a classroom setting, where an instructor reads from a textbook to teach.
    With the current education system, many young Americans often go to the workforce, not realizing the lack of practical skills that are necessary for all industries. Some of these skills include strong communication and interpersonal networking. Many companies are also becoming more reliant on data to make critical financial investments. Therefore, college graduates who studied business analysis are receiving lucrative offers from many corporations that need their expertise. Meanwhile, a degree in art history is useless. This raises another issue: inequality. Education in the United States is one of the primary gateways to prosperity. This was possible because of government initiatives such as Morrill Act of 1862 and Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944. With these acts, the American education was able to produce high-quality colleges and universities that accepted people from all backgrounds. In 2015, NPR reported that “975,000” international students came the previous year because of many reasons that separate the United States from other countries. A student in the United States receives many opportunities to do well in class while a student in China has to obtain a high score in tests to have a bright future. Because the United States education system offers multiple chances to prosper, many international students are willing to leave their homes for the same prospects that many American students take for granted.
    However, the current American education does not hold the same value it once did. In the study conducted at Pew Research Center, the analysts used Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to compare academic abilities such as reading comprehension and scientific literacy among students in different countries. In 2015, the United States was in 38th place in math out of 71 sovereign states and 24th in science. We have to ask ourselves what we value most now and what we need to teach for the new generation to succeed in the 21st century. It is time to renovate our teaching methods as the world is heading towards to an uncertain future. It is our job to prepare the students with the necessary tools to tackle the unknown.

    • Jacob Abel February 2, 2018 at 2:52 pm #

      I agree with a lot of what you said. Universities are going to have to adjust to the changing times and start offering skills that help people prepare for the suture. I really like your argument of foreign students studying in the United States. I saw a statistic by the US college board that said International students are paying upwards of $58,000 a year to come and study in the United States. The US is going to have to increase its science and math literary rates as it is falling behind the rest of the world. If we want to stay competitive in the private sector our education has to do much better.

  16. Jacob Abel February 2, 2018 at 2:46 pm #

    This article offers a very good outline of the many increasing problems with Universities today. Taxing Universities and graduate students would seem to have the opposite effect of what us actually intends. Increasing the operational costs of universities would only effect the students as we would probably have to pay. As the article states universities and government should be working together to tackle rising costs so that it is affordable for anyone to go to college. According to the US College board the average cost of attending a public university is $25,620. This is a large sum of money and most Americans have to take out loans to be able to afford this. As the article also states student lean debt is now more than credit card debit in the United States. This places a huge burden on anyone wanting to go to college whether you want to be a doctor or even president.
    According to a report by CNN Money the US government actually loses money off of undergraduate loans but profits off of graduate loans. In total the US government loans about 100 billion dollars per year to students. Given the fact that a large portion of students default on their loans a new solution is clearly needed. The long history that the article outlines of the cooperation between government and education is going to be key to the future. Whether the solution is making 2 year associate degrees more viable or increasing funding from the government. Government is more than likely going to have to increase grants and funding on the federal and state level.
    Cooperation between schools and the private sector may be key as well. Private investment into universities is also something that is already happening and may afford more opportunities to students who are seeking a college education.
    Universities and the US in general may have lost that great challenge that drove innovation. Whether thats the push westward or the cold war the US as a whole doesn’t seem to be pushing towards something. This is in large part where the cooperation between government and education seemed to come from. There needs to be a new challenge that galvanizes the two sides to increase cooperation and this is most likely still in the tech industry.

  17. zhijie Yang February 2, 2018 at 3:14 pm #

    This article raises many questions about taxing universities. By taxing universities, the government is actually implementing the notion that universities are no longer social standards; it is a privilege. If they decide to tax colleges and universities, I think the school will make up for it by raising tuition fees. Raising taxes can hurt students’ interests and keep them away from solutions.
    Tax cuts are one of the landmark policy promises of the Trump administration in the United States. On November 16, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the tax reform bill with 227 votes in favor and 205 votes against it. Trump said this is a major step toward realizing his tax cut. However, while corporate tax rates are down, one group will be hit hard by the tax reform act. According to the U.S. financial newspaper CNBC16, due to the bill requiring graduate students to pay taxes for the tuition fee waived, if the law takes effect, the amount of tax paid by the graduate students in the United States will increase 3-4 times. “The House just voted to bankrupt a graduate student,” Erin Rousseau, who studies neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, wrote in The New York Times on the 16th. The Washington Post quoted a congressional tax union’s estimate that the bill would add more than $ 71 billion to students and families over the next 10 years.
    The government has long ignored the academic community and it needs to stop. Tuition fees continued to grow, with student debt reaching trillions of dollars across the country. This article points out the relationship between government and academia. From an early age, higher education was a priority to help individuals and society as a whole. The government needs to play a more active role in relations with universities.
    “This will make it almost impossible to make a living, only the richest students are able to read Ph.D. “Wrote Luso in The New York Times. At present, minority groups in colleges and universities are hardest hit, and many students are almost certain to completely leave academia. This will substantially weaken the competitiveness of the United States. Only those who are wealthy receive higher education, while those who can not afford it are excluded, and I find it financially hard for most people to do and seemingly impossible. By raising the price of tuition, universities not only allocate unequal access to academic opportunities, but they must also reach new levels of attractiveness where they must find creative motivation to attract potential applicants.
    I personally think that on how to solve this problem, the government should include all the universities in the government’s important supervision and set the fund bottom line. This will help to limit the debt that students have to bear after graduation. It will also reduce college budgets so that they can stop spending resources where it’s not needed; schools should not increase funding for graduate students to attract them because the government is weakening the university’s sources of funding. Eventually, students will be able to enter higher education schools with good grades, not whether they have enough money. I also think the government can help lower the interest rates on student loans. In other words, investing in young people is a very important issue. With a good education and more chances of investing in the university, the future of this society will be even better.

  18. Dinara Kasumova February 2, 2018 at 3:47 pm #

    Without a degree, in the United States it is very had to find a well paying job to be able to support yourself and potentially a family. For this reason the majority of the population aim to get a college education after high school. For a very long time however, college students have accumulated excessive amount of student debt which is difficult to pay off. To go to college for 4 years for most means going into debt right after, and it is very hard to find jobs after school, in some fields more so than others. The United States government has been looking for ways to reduce the issue of student debt for many years, however the U.S. national debt continues to rise, which makes it hard to get rid of student debt. As a kid my parents put it in my head that grades are the most important part of school, my grades would be the reflection of my knowledge and understanding of certain topics. Thankfully I got lucky to have the parents that I have, who take care of the financial aspects of my education. Not everyone is as lucky as I am however, which is why we need to find ways to reduce college debt, so more people can afford a higher education.

  19. Frank Mabalatan February 2, 2018 at 5:56 pm #

    Education has always been the basis for upward mobility, for both an individual and a society. Throughout time, standards for education have continuously raised and the world is presently in a state in which one cannot make a better life for himself without first receiving a proper education. Career opportunities are rare for those without a college degree if one chooses not to take up a trade. As Americans, millions of young men and women are willing to accept the hard work and dedication required of them to pursue higher education. As our Declaration of Independence states, “that all men are created equal” and have a right to the “life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness”. In today’s age, it is tremendously difficult to have all three without higher education. Therefore, our government has an obligation to make college education accessible for all, rather than restrict such an opportunity further.

    With tuition rising at a suffocating rate, many students make debilitating financial sacrifices in order to attain a degree. Taxes on university endowments diminish the quality of a college education, further overcharging the students of America. This practice infringes on the college student’s unalienable rights and is detrimental to American society. For the betterment of this union, the American government should advocate for the education of its citizens by any means possible and a tax on university endowments does the opposite of that. Emily Levine and Mitchell Stevens’s article highlights the inherent problems with the system of higher education in the United States. The culture of higher education needs to shift from favoring the privileged few to being invested in the futures of all Americans if we are to truly live in a nation in which anyone can be successful. Policy change does not happen if culture does not change first and the greatest step towards that is support from our government.

    Related reading: http://time.com/money/3767166/college-admissions-rich-advantage-inequality/

  20. marcello bertuzzelli February 2, 2018 at 6:14 pm #

    Over the course of time, the dollar has lost value and prices have risen. Whether it be a loaf of bread or the education that is forced, yet desired, the price has risen. The price of further education through university had gotten so high the United States Government began to grant loans as a source of credit enabling people to create plans in order to pay off their schooling. In present day, federal loans are consuming almost all Americans and on average leaves graduates with a debt of roughly thirty eight thousand dollars. The proposals made in The Right Way to Fix Universities are very ambitious, but if followed through can be very powerful and will make a large impact on the American culture and society. In a world of technological advancements, it is crucial to stay up to date with what is going on in the world because it can be hard to can be hard to play an active role as a member of society if you are not adjusting to the ever-changing scenery of life. The American work place for those desiring wealth in the form of high paying jobs is very competitive and opportunities are constantly missed due to a lack of criteria. As technology advances and jobs are being lost to technology it is important for everyone to have access to knowledge, knowledge which can lead to a build of criteria allowing citizens to actively serve our community. However, this is not possible if people are losing more money with a desire of someday breaking even. With the Government providing affordable degrees that allow people to ready themselves for the work place, America will be great again. I agree with the authors in the last paragraph where it states, “History shows that universities flourish when they work with the government to bring tangible value to the entire society.”

  21. Dean Spenzos February 2, 2018 at 7:31 pm #

    It is understandable to see how both sides of this argument are thinking. On the one hand, schools need to make money and they are not going to lower their prices if they are making more money with higher prices. Nothing is free and the schools are capitalizing on the fact that a college degree is so highly valued in our society. On the other hand, there has been a very clear and significant increase in college tuition over the last few years. It has gotten to the point that only people who are economically well-off that can attend these schools. I think it is very important to lower the prices and make a college degree something that more people can attain. There are people who could do great things with a college degree but are not given the opportunity because their parents might not have enough money to send them to college. It leaves a big gap in society that needs to be closed. These schools should definitely be working with the state to come to some sort of agreement that would benefit all parties involved. Personally, I think the the issue of affordable schooling for everyone is possibly the biggest domestic issue we currently face.
    The G.I. Bill is a perfect example of the opportunity we can provide to millions of people who would not otherwise have that opportunity. Knowledge is one of the most valuable, intangible items a person can possess and this bill gave millions of veterans and family of veterans affordable schooling. It is the government’s job to find a point where they are not interfering too much but still regulating certain markets enough to keep things fair for all citizens. The high prices of college tuition is one of the matters the government needs to step up and start making negotiations to benefit our society as a whole. If we make the right decision here we have the chance to make a real difference in the lives of millions of people and it is the job of universities, the states, and the government to do it.

  22. Coby Dunn February 7, 2018 at 5:35 pm #

    Higher level education has been recognized as “Providing a service to society” as described by the New York Times. This service includes education, and a Segway for young Americans to enter the workforce, earn money and live the American dream. Congresses plan to tax endowments raises concern among universities and students alike. What will this tax bill mean for colleges in the future? What, if any, benefits can come out of this? And, what will this mean for the already prevalent problem of high costs in colleges? With rising costs of tuition, college has become something that is mostly only accessible to higher income families. This is a serious problem for a country that is trying to build an educated youth, and a brighter future. These taxes are not going to lower college costs, and we will remain in the same position that we are currently in. One of the greatest things America has ever done in the face of college spending and education was the creation of the GI bill for soldiers returning after World War Two. It gave Soldiers the ability to get a free education. However, since the 1980’s tuition has been steadily rising. College went from something that was available to pretty much everyone, to being limited to families that could pay for it. The GI bill, and how it works in universities is a great model that more colleges should try to follow for other families that may not have service personnel in their life. Imagine being able to go to college without your parents have to mortgage their own financial futures. One argument that congress has proposed for this new tax plan is that they will earn 1.8 billion in revenue over the next ten years. While this sounds amazing, let us stop and think about the economic detriment of this. As I said earlier, this tax bill will not lower college costs. This is going to limit college students to those who can afford it, and the public is not going to get any more educated. If anything, we are going to be left with a society of an educated upper class, and a working class that never had the chance to go to college. The New York Times made a great point in saying that the GI bill offers a great model for colleges to follow. But, for the meantime, we are faced with a movement to impose taxes on an already problematic situation. College should be available for everyone, and we need to do more to facilitate that.

  23. Tanner Purcel February 7, 2018 at 10:54 pm #

    Higher-level education is labeled as a way for young Americans to enter the workforce and find high-paying jobs. The congressional plan to tax the grants of wealthy private schools and the tuition benefits of graduate students has caused concerns from both universities and its students. A college degree is the second largest expense in the country, right behind buying a new home, so many are hoping that this plan makes it more accessible for students to get higher education, however these taxes will ultimately not lower the cost of higher education.
    The creation of the GI bill after World War II allowed soldiers who served in the war to get a free education. The GI Bill is a blueprint for the United States government. It is something that they should follow in order to give everyone an opportunity to get higher education. The bill sent over two million veterans to college. This remade America’s social class and gave these veterans a chance to receive a higher education. Congress has proposed an idea in which their new tax plan will earn them 1.8 billion dollars in revenue within 10 years. This will not lessen college tuition, and it would make college more exclusive.
    It is understandable that schools raise their prices in order to make money. They know how valuable a college degree is and how much someone will give up getting one, but some people have nothing to give up. College tuition is one of the biggest problems young Americans face today.

  24. Antonia James February 8, 2018 at 8:10 pm #

    As a child, you are told that education is the key to your success. Having a good education will open doors that can provide economic stability and a good future. During high school students vigorously seek scholarships through various sporting activities or excel academically in order to fulfill that dream of going to college to further their education. In addition, with the advancement of technology and competition in the job market more and more adults have also returned to college. In a report released by the Census Bureau stated that 33.4 percent of Americans 25 or older said they had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher. That’s a sharp rise from the 28 percent with a college degree a decade ago. But college remains an unaffordable and unattainable goal for many Americans. Those who make the choice to proceed are faced with tuition debts through credit cards and student loans. Many parents are mortgaging their homes or borrowing against their retirement fund to pay for their children tuition. The average annual increase in college tuition from 1980-2014 grew by nearly 260% compared to the nearly 120% increase in all consumer items. In 1980, the average cost of tuition, room, and board, and fees at a four-year post-secondary institution was $9,438, according to the Department of Education. That number has since climbed to $23,872.

    Growing college enrollment contributes to increased costs in two ways. It necessitates the hiring of more administrative staff, which can be costly. It also normally means that the expenditures, from state and federal government, per student are lower, again placing the burden of tuition and fees on students and families. According to the article in the New York Times, Institutions once deemed essential partners in nation-building came to seem overstuffed and defensive — they enjoyed generous tax breaks yet crankily rebuffed calls for cost containment. This is the historical context in which Congress is summoning universities back to the bargaining table. Congress is essentially placing the responsibilities on the universities to fix this problem. Their solution is Congressional plans to tax the endowments of wealthy private schools. Private endowments tax: The bill includes a 1.4 percent excise tax on investment income at private colleges with an enrollment of at least 500 students and with assets valued at $500,000 per full-time student. The provision is estimated to raise about $1.8 billion in revenue over 10 years. This decision will clearly affect students. To supplement this lost, universities would increase tuition, books and even lower their standard of education. Full-time professors with years of knowledge can be replaced by adjunct teachers. In the end, the students would be the one paying the cost of the decision. Unless congress decides to reinvest the 1.8 billion back into students by giving more financial aid. According to time.com, the wealthiest 25 colleges got a combined $26.3 billion richer last year. That growth in their endowments was helped by a year of healthy investment returns. I believe that the government and the universities should come together and make a collective effort to help the future generation. The nation’s founders nourished great aspirations for higher learning and we should make every effort to uphold that.

  25. jaymie nieves February 9, 2018 at 4:03 pm #

    “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”(Nelson Mandela) Education is gives us power change and develop ourselves as well as others. Education helps us mold our thoughts and curiosity into a powerful tool to use in the world. Education has shaped great minds into changing our world and developing it further along for future generation. Should this great resource for furthering our country’s success be taxed? Taxing colleges and university can make the government more money, but would not benefit the future of our country. Taxing these universities means taxing the students attending them. The government is putting more pressure on students who already struggle with current tuition prices. Many students who attend college are on financial aid because of the high tuition prices. Taxing universities will increase tuition prices and may prevent future students from achieve their future careers. I believe that universities should receive tax breaks or exemptions for providing low cost tuition. This will benefit the students as well as the university. Not only spark a rise in education, it further develops our country. Statistics have shown that country’s national wealth is correlated positively to education.
    Europe has seen a positive impact from education and highly invests in its citizen’s education. They understand the importance of an education and results has shown its effectiveness. Current tuition prices in Europe are very low and provide excellent educational services. The European system is mostly based on public funding. This is a different concept compared to America. They believe that everyone should have access to resource that’s irreplaceable.
    As the Article states, “The current plan for taxing endowments does not address the problems that rightly drive citizen fury: soaring costs, educational inequality and schools’ resistance to change.” There are several problems with the current plan that can high impact the future for education. This system promotes the idea of only the wealth getting high education. Prices for high level education will increase, not allowing regular student to afford it without being put in tremendous debt. For years students have been taken advantage of for furthering their education path and it isn’t fair. The government should realize by investing in the education if the youth, it will be a guaranteed gain in overall wealth for our country. If universities received tax breaks or exemptions for providing low cost tuition this will give many students as possible the shot at a college education.

  26. Christopher Salimbene February 9, 2018 at 9:57 pm #

    In today’s world, education is one of the most important aspects people need in order to have a bright future ahead of them. For some universities, the tuition is too expensive to the point that students are either transferring out or end up in a high amount of debt after graduation. I believe that reducing tuition costs for most universities will allow more students to have a college education at an affordable cost and help them achieve goals toward their major. Also, retaining expensive college tuition for students that need a college education would cause them to possibly struggle at their jobs in the future if they don’t end up receiving a college education. Universities should realize that students won’t attend their school if the tuition is out of range for them and provide them with plans that would cause them to not have an abundance of debt after graduation. The government should approach this issue by reducing tuition for students that live in the same state as the university and come up with a solution for those out of state so that they don’t have to face debt for an extended period of time. Reduced tuition causes a variety of students to receive a college education and allow them to be successful toward their future goals.
    Another solution to this issue that I believe is providing scholarships to those students that succeed in high school either from sports, clubs, or academics. For example, high school students do whatever it takes for them to earn scholarships and have reduced tuition starting their freshman year of college, and offering them a scholarship toward a certain college would cause them to attend the school and not hesitate when choosing which school that they want to attend for the next four years. Scholarships represent all the hard work that high school students do and recognize them in certain activities such as sports, clubs, academics, or even community service. Universities shouldn’t just look for students who have a GPA that matches their requirement or excellent performance on the SATS, they should realize their strengths in other areas and provide them with reduced tuition due to their success in that particular area. Also, universities should give scholarships on community service because those people helped those that either struggle every day or assisting their community by cleaning or creating a fundraiser, and this represents people who care about others and should be recognized for this toward college. Most people today use financial aid to assist them of buying books and other utilities with college, and they can’t use financial aid to pay off everything that they need at their university and having a scholarship would cause their life to be more comfortable and not worry about a high amount of debt after they receive their Bachelor’s degree. If universities don’t provide more scholarships, then students will be paying off their debt for a longer period of time and would cause some students to not even have a college education with fair tuition.
    Finally, the last solution to fix universities is by reducing the tax for private universities. For example, there are a variety of private universities in America that are highly expensive and retaining the tax rate for these private universities would cause less students to attend them, and a poor amount of success toward the university. However, some of these private universities are the best in the nation with certain degree programs but some students wouldn’t be interested if the tuition cost is too high because of the tax rate and being in debt for an extended period of time. The government needs to promote education more rather than taxes because this would cause less students to receive a college education and majority of them might have to leave the university early to avoid paying off student loans for the rest of their life. Due to this action, some students take a year off to work so that they have enough money to pay off some of this debt while in school but the con to this is that it causes them to lose memory from what they learned in high school, and tend to struggle in some of their first year classes. Reducing the tax rate to these private universities would allow more students to attend them and have a positive education rather than struggling with attending the school and having more experience toward their future job.

  27. Christopher Salimbene February 9, 2018 at 9:59 pm #

    In today’s world, education is one of the most important aspects people need in order to have a bright future ahead of them. For some universities, the tuition is too expensive to the point that students are either transferring out or end up in a high amount of debt after graduation. I believe that reducing tuition costs for most universities will allow more students to have a college education at an affordable cost and help them achieve goals toward their major. Also, retaining expensive college tuition for students that need a college education would cause them to possibly struggle at their jobs in the future if they don’t end up receiving a college education. Universities should realize that students won’t attend their school if the tuition is out of range for them and provide them with plans that would cause them to not have an abundance of debt after graduation. The government should approach this issue by reducing tuition for students that live in the same state as the university and come up with a solution for those out of state so that they don’t have to face debt for an extended period of time. Reduced tuition causes a variety of students to receive a college education and allow them to be successful toward their future goals.
    Another solution to this issue that I believe is providing scholarships to those students that succeed in high school either from sports, clubs, or academics. For example, high school students do whatever it takes for them to earn scholarships and have reduced tuition starting their freshman year of college, and offering them a scholarship toward a certain college would cause them to attend the school and not hesitate when choosing which school that they want to attend for the next four years. Scholarships represent all the hard work that high school students do and recognize them in certain activities such as sports, clubs, academics, or even community service. Universities shouldn’t just look for students who have a GPA that matches their requirement or excellent performance on the SATS, they should realize their strengths in other areas and provide them with reduced tuition due to their success in that particular area. Also, universities should give scholarships on community service because those people helped those that either struggle every day or assisting their community by cleaning or creating a fundraiser, and this represents people who care about others and should be recognized for this toward college. Most people today use financial aid to assist them of buying books and other utilities with college, and they can’t use financial aid to pay off everything that they need at their university and having a scholarship would cause their life to be more comfortable and not worry about a high amount of debt after they receive their Bachelor’s degree. If universities don’t provide more scholarships, then students will be paying off their debt for a longer period of time and would cause some students to not even have a college education with fair tuition.
    Finally, the last solution to fix universities is by reducing the tax for private universities. For example, there are a variety of private universities in America that are highly expensive and retaining the tax rate for these private universities would cause less students to attend them, and a poor amount of success toward the university. However, some of these private universities are the best in the nation with certain degree programs but some students wouldn’t be interested if the tuition cost is too high because of the tax rate and being in debt for an extended period of time. The government needs to promote education more rather than taxes because this would cause less students to receive a college education and majority of them might have to leave the university early to avoid paying off student loans for the rest of their life. Due to this action, some students take a year off to work so that they have enough money to pay off some of this debt while in school but the con to this is that it causes them to lose memory from what they learned in high school, and tend to struggle in some of their first year classes. Reducing the tax rate to these private universities would allow more students to attend them and have a positive education rather than struggling with attending the school and having more experience toward their future job.

  28. Jacob McDougall June 9, 2018 at 6:37 pm #

    As education is the framework for a stronger and promised tomorrow, we also have to take a step back and look at the education industry that the United States has. When you take a look at the income in tuition alone that students pay on an annual basis, the numbers are quite mind-blowing. Whenever you see numbers that are in the hundreds of millions into the tens of billions of dollars, you can guarantee that Congress is wondering how they can tax it. In theory, this idea of taxing educational institutions makes sense – it would be very profitable. However, ethically it is a terrible idea. Students that are paying their way through college are already paying astronomical tuition rates as it is, taking out loans that they are still not sure how they are going to pay back in a timely fashion, and agreeing to interest rates that are disgustingly high because they have no other choice when it comes to seeking a higher education. In today’s society, we are quickly watching the Associate’s Degree become the new high school diploma, the Bachelor’s Degree the new Associate’s Degree, and so on. This means that receiving a college education is even more imperative today than it was for previous generations. In most states, there is not a living minimum wage so uneducated workers are struggling as it is and in many cases end up having to seek out higher education. Taxing universities and colleges will only make these costs rise. Students will be forced to take out even higher loans than they ever have before, and those who are on the fence about applying to college due to the cost will probably not even enroll. I believe that if we start to tax universities and colleges, we will see a spike in the number of uneducated workers in our society and a rise in the number of people living in poverty within the United States.

    In addition, taxing universities will infringe on the accomplishments and situations of students that are entitled to/require financial assistance to attend college. Sports scholarships, grants, and academic financial awards/scholarships would now be taxed per each individual student, taking away from their financial assistance – leading to even more loans. This will not only require students to take out more debt, but also it will demotivate them to receive a higher education. I say this because I believe that at least some students will not feel fully supported by their university and their government, and will lack the fundamental understanding of the value of higher education if a substantial amount of their AWARD is being taken out for tax purposes. If the government needs more money, I suggest taxing other entities – like churches (but that is another hot button issue that I won’t discuss here) or industries like the medicinal/recreational marijuana industry. If the United States restricted the federal ban on marijuana use/possession and allowed states to set up individualized, taxed marijuana dispensaries, there will be a TON of additional tax revenue brought in annually (just look at how well Colorado is doing). Overall, taxing universities is infringing on the opportunities that our students are given, and since that the students in college of today are the future of tomorrow, I strongly suggest that the US government does not tax educational institutions because we need as many educated workers as we can in order to maintain being a global powerhouse economically since unskilled labor is not the United States’ speciality. This article was definitely a compelling read, and as a college student myself, I know that if my scholarships were to be taxed, I would not feel confident enough in my education to get a job that would be able to support the amount of loans that I will have to pay off in just a few years, considering I chose to attend a private university will annual tuition costs just under $50,000.

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