Unselling

from Seth’s Blog

Getting someone to switch to you is totally different from getting someone who’s new to the market to start using the solution you offer.

Switching means:

Admitting I was wrong, and, in many cases, leaving behind some of my identity, because my tribe (as I see them) is using what I used to use.

So, if you want to get a BMW motorcycle owner to buy a Harley as his next bike, you have your work cut out for you.

He’s not eager to say, “well, I got emotionally involved with something, but I realized that there’s a better choice so I switched, I was wrong and now I’m right.”

And he’s certainly not looking forward to walking away from his own self-defined circle and enduring the loneliness as he finds a new circle.

More here.

27 Responses to Unselling

  1. Andrew Imbesi April 4, 2017 at 8:16 pm #

    I will never forget the time when I walked out of this barbershop with what I thought was “the perfect haircut”. Ever since that day, James is the only barber that has consistently cut my hair appointment after appointment. My customer loyalty to my barber has been ongoing for the past five years, and will continue in the new shop he is working at not too far from his old one.
    Once a person is sold to something, they give up their willingness to explore other options. Customer loyalty and preferences are critical, especially when running a business. People want the best platforms, services, and products out there. Once a person comes across a reputable pattern they can follow along with effortlessly, they become attached to that pattern. Apple offers a great display for iMessage, a display many people prefer when buying a smartphone. Regardless of Apple taking the headphone jack off iPhones (considerably a con since the choice of wired or wireless is gone), people still bought Apple iPhones for their superb operating system.
    However, not everyone owns an iPhone, and for people who commonly drop their phones they might buy a Samsung Galaxy. Competition opens the door to disrupt customer loyalty. Uber, the first driver service app to really take off, can easily be taken down by its competitor Lyft. Lyft offers the same service as Uber, but often cheaper in areas where Uber is not.
    Even though Lyft is cheaper, many people still use Uber and find their service worthwhile. Additionally, Uber is mainstream, and was the first to put their product out there beyond anyone else. Being the person to innovate something first is key. I aspire to be like Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg, a one-of-a-kind person that comes across so few times in life that they change the mass lives of people with revolutionary ideas. Musk sold his ideas of transportation and energy of the future, and I sure as hell want a Tesla just like the many other people he has on board. Zuckerberg provided the platform everyone can interact on, why did not I create this website before him.
    Once these brand new innovations come out, they seem simple, almost as if “Wow, how did it take this long to come up with this idea”. However, the answer to these innovations is not so simple, innovations simply do not appear, and creating something is more difficult than it seems. Elon Musk simply did not amount to a net worth of over ten billion overnight, it took years to reach the position he is in. A phrase I enjoy to coin is “make it, master it, then matter” because to me, that is the blunt truth about life. One day I may have to be stuck behind an office desk working for someone else, but I can assure myself that I will walk away from that desk to pursue my own dreams at some point. One day I will discover something perfect for me to master so I can truly have value in the world. It is all a matter of me selling my idea.

    • Olivia Tarnawska April 5, 2017 at 4:07 pm #

      It was refreshing to read Andrew’s comment especially when he states “Once a person is sold to something, they give up their willingness to explore other options. Customer loyalty and preferences are critical, especially when running a business.” This is so true. Andrew presented an example with his loyalty to his barber. I can relate because the only person I would trust my hair with is my mom who is a hairstylist. I would also only trust my aunt with waxing my eyebrows because she specializes in that and also makes me a happy customer every time I make an appointment. That is what I also think is key. When a customer is happy with the service provided and outcome of it, they’re less willing to give others a chance to meet their standards. Why give someone else service when the one you are getting it from is satisfying you? Andrew also provided a good point when he mentioned the example with Apple and when stating “once a person comes across a reputable pattern they can follow along with effortlessly, they become attached to that pattern.” I do think people become attached too. People are never really willing to give up things they like and/or satisfied with. Just like a company that needs to obtain loyal clientele to keep it running, those clients that are happy with the company will ultimately stay with them too. So the point that Godin makes when saying “Getting someone to switch to you is totally different from getting someone who’s new to the market to start using the solution you offer”, proves true as well.

  2. John Phillips April 6, 2017 at 11:48 pm #

    In this article, “Unselling”, Seth brings up some interesting points regarding the mindset of selling. He believes that the art of selling, has become status quo. In modern society, the new age of technology and other such innovation have created a chain of salesmen who use the same practices, and bring nothing unique to the table. He goes into the principles behind being a good salesmen and what it truly means to sell something. Rather than trying to sell people on why your product or service is better than the other, you have to create something of your own. In doing so, you will inform people on this new idea, influencing them to listen to what you are saying. In the conventional market, people try to one up their competitors, but this is not a sustainable model for success. The people who have true success are the innovators, those who bring new ideas to the market, and understand what it is they are trying to sell. In sales, it is my opinion, that before you can sell anything, you must first learn how to sell yourself. Learning how to give a dynamic presentation, using passion and knowledge is the number one skill any person can learn. If you can sell yourself, you can sell anything. This all ties into branding, you must think of yourself as a brand, building and improving yourself will only help your personal brand. Once you have reached your full potential as a person, and understand the intricacies of sales, then you can begin selling what it is you want to sell. This process of mastering yourself, is only the first step to becoming an effective salesperson in the eyes of myself and Seth. The next phase is developing your idea, and finally, figuring out and executing a plan. Now that you understand what it takes to be an effective sales person, it is time for you to master the product. First, identifying the goals and purpose of your idea. You need to ask, what does it do? What problems will it solve? Is it a solution? These questions give a basic criterion for what the goal of your innovation is. You want to create something that has never been created before. Problems and issues are always being created each day, and they all need solutions. Once you answer these questions, and develop a strong plan as to how our idea will fix the you need to market it. Effective marketing requires an identification of the target audience. Who needs this product and why? Once you can identify the target audience, you can put together all of the facets of sales and start selling. You have mastered yourself, developed your brand, learned how to sell, and developed a strategy. Trying to latch onto existing trends is a failed idea, and has no long term sustainability. If you identify current problems and offer solutions, you are guaranteeing yourself success in the long term. The audience will be drawn to you, simply because you are unique. With effective presentation, and dynamic salesmanship you are guaranteed to have success. Trying to latch onto trends, and money grab is an ineffective strategy. This is why you must master yourself and be innovative.

  3. Matthew Radman April 7, 2017 at 11:45 am #

    Marketing is the real art of doing business. Persuading a potential customer o to pull the trigger on your products or services can be challenging because of the difficulty of getting a person to trust a marketer. When a business is growing, the priorities of salespeople is to gain customers. This can seem like a grueling task as going from non-existence to a well-known brand requires a tipping point that can take years to achieve. When a company reaches maturity, the priorities shift gradually towards acquiring customers from competitors. When most companies arrive at a certain mpoint, between them and their competitors lies 90% of clients. That is the point where marketing focus becomes solely dedicated to luring customers from competitors.

    Seth raises an interesting point in that the clients’ interactions with business are honestly and often deeply personal. When people pay money for a service, they not only exchange their cash, they transfer their trust. Once a customer is loyal to a brand, it would take an army to get them to leave. Leaving means, as Seth states, a customer admits that they were wrong in not switching sooner. It requires risking comfort for the possibility of a better product.

    Seth thinking points bring up interesting thoughts. “If you seek to grow quickly, realize that your best shot is to get in early before people have made a commitment, built allegiances and started to engage in cognitive dissonance (since I picked this one, it must be good).” Clearly, the best way to lure in customers is to be the first that they buy from. Getting to customers first will help guide customers to a company and once a customer, loyalty will allow for retention.

    “If you are marketing to people who will have to switch to engage with you, do it with intention. Your pitch of, “this is very very good” is insufficient. Your pitch of, “you need something in this category” makes no sense, because I am already buying in that category. Instead, you must spend the time, the effort and the money to teach me new information that allows me to make a new decision. Not that I was wrong before, but that I was under-informed.” Marketing to people already buying in an industry is different from new customers because of ethe whole idea of demand changes. People no longer need solutions; they need their best option.

    “Ignore the official links at your peril. Without a doubt, “people like us do things like this,” is the most powerful marketing mantra available. Make it real, then share the news.” Ultimately, humans are animals. Mob mentality can be very powerful, including in marketing. Customers want to feel like they are part of something, something that understands them and their needs, something that other people enjoy. The “people like us do things like this” is a powerful mantra indeed. Selling is hard enough of a business tactic; unselling can prove to be even more challenging because it requires a customer to agree that they made a mistake and left them vulnerable.

  4. Peter DeSantis April 7, 2017 at 2:21 pm #

    Seth Godin, the author of the article “Unselling,” defines the title as the process of getting someone to switch their ideas about something, in most cases a product. The object is to change someone’s mind in order to get them to agree with you or purchase the product you are selling. This is why it is called unselling. The customer has already been sold on the product he has and has potentially been using it for an elongated period of time. Now the goal of the salesman of the rival product somehow has to “unsell” that product to the customer and sell him on the competing product. His task is to inform the customer of this new other product and explain why it is better or more valuable than the one he currently has. This becomes quite a daunting task when the customer has a connection with his current product or if he has an intense love for the company, which makes his beloved products. It might sound crazy, but it happens. Some companies just make superior products compared to their competitors. When a consumer is looking for the perfect product and he finds it, he experiences a euphoria and can fall in love with the business that made it.

    Godin gives some excellent advice to salespeople, marketers and advertisers, and anyone who deals with business in general. It is obvious that he understands people and knows how they function in business deal circumstances. The bet piece of advice given by Godin to marketers trying to get people to switch to their side is to watch their wordings and pitch with intention. This meaning that it is not effective to say things like, “This is very very good…[or] you need something in this category.” If you are trying to get someone to switch to your product, the individual most likely already likes the product he has currently and that is obviously a good within said “category.” Godin says that the intention of the pitch must be to inform. The salesman needs to do extensive research both on the products he is selling and on the customer he is selling to in order to accurately inform and answer any questions. As a customer, it is much easier to listen to someone simply explain what their product is all about rather than listen to someone rant about how much better their product is than the one you already own. If a salesperson does that, it is equivalent to them saying that their customer was wrong when making the best purchase. Obviously, that would be a terrible sales tactic because no one likes to be told that they were wrong. Also, it makes it less likely that a marketer would switch anyone to their side considering that if a customer were to suddenly switch, it would be the same as him admitting that he was originally wrong when he thought he had already chosen the best product. How many people willingly admit that they were wrong?

    I enjoyed reading this article because I find it to be quite valuable. As a student majoring in finance and accounting, the chances that at some point in my career I will need to sell something to someone or pitch an idea to some sort of board are very high. I believe it is important that I understand how to properly pitch an idea or product now while I am still in school so that I will be ready to do so when it actually matters. I am currently in the Hall Street Fund, and I think that this article will help me to improve my stock pitches and the approach that I take.

  5. Hakim Felder April 7, 2017 at 4:36 pm #

    The urban dictionary of unselling is to dissuade from a belief in the desirability, value, wisdom, or truth of something. Examples of this would consist of the organization gets input from scientists, specialists in communication, researchers and others, and offers resources for parents and teenagers on its website. It focused efforts to “unsell” illegal drugs such as cocaine, heroin, prescription drugs, marijuana, Ecstasy, and others, as well as discouraging abuse of alcohol and nitrous oxide, by breaking away from a standard public service approach and doing a coordinated media campaign. While the organization has focused drug prevention advertising on broadcast media such as television, there are signs in recent years that it is shifting media support to emerging channels such as video-on-demand, digital technology and particularly the Internet. Seth Godin who is the Arthur of this article “Unselling” where his interpretation of the definition is the process of getting someone to switch their ideas about something, in most cases a product. This happens all the time in today’s world, we all have experience when our parents could not afford to purchase us certain things so they would try to persuade us to not desire the product as much as we do. They would not tell us they cannot afford it, they would keep making excuses about why they cannot get the product we wanted till we get mad and understand we were not going to get what we wanted by the time we wanted. Or you could take into consideration market competition. A perfect market competition would be like mc Donald’s and burger kings, to evenly matched markets. It is easier to unsell someone to buy burger king than Mc Donald’s and vice versa because they are so evenly matched if you don’t like the one you can get the other. Which is different from subways and a really bodega store. You can attempt to unsell that subway is not as good as the bodega but subway has a better market and a better variety. It would not be a potential argument.
    Seth gives us few thing to think about, one thing that stuck out to me was his 2nd point he made in this article. He states If you are marketing to people who will have to switch to engage with you, do it with intention. Your pitch of, “this is very good” is insufficient. Your pitch of, “you need something in this category” makes no sense, because I’m already buying in that category. Instead, you must spend the time, the effort and the money to teach me new information that allows me to make a new decision. Not that I was wrong before, but that I was under-informed.” This shows how much persuasion is required to change someone’s perspective. If the person feels like you are forcing them to make the decision in their favor the individual would get scared away and back. You have to make them feel like they need it and you would be the best choice for the job.

  6. Julian Manzano April 7, 2017 at 5:02 pm #

    In the United States, we believe in capitalism, which is defined as, “an economic and political system in which a country’s trade and industry are controlled by private owners for profit, rather than by the state.” This basically means that companies are in control of themselves and they are selling a product solely with the mindset of maximizing their profit (this is one of the basics of economics). This gives the company freedom to price their products however they want to. It also guarantees that that there will be companies that will sell very similar products to you. This is what is called a competitive market, and this happens for almost every product, which is great for the economy to make sure there are no monopolies. Since there is always competition, companies have to market their products knowing this. Companies have to understand that people do not switch to other brands or products so easily, so being able to accomplish this is the key to being a successful company.
    Being the first in the market is usually a great way to start off a successful company. Most companies who have created a product are still around today. Their originality and product was so good that they still manage to be around in today’s market. If you are able to grab consumers’ attention before any other brands, you will be the company that they will stick with and stay loyal to as they would feel comfortable with only your product. If consumers are satisfied with you product for the first time, they will like it and continue to buy your product rather than others’. This is the best way to become a leader in a competitive market because you will be ahead of every competitor and you will have customer loyalty before them as well.
    To keep customers is another thing that companies have to deal with. Since there are many competitors with similar products, companies have to be able to keep their customers. Obviously, having a superior product with better features is a great thing to have, but that will not always be the complete way to keeping customers. Just telling your customers that your product is “great” and “better than others” will not do anything for them understanding that you are telling them what you want them to hear. So instead, educate customers and let them know why your product is better. The extra time and effort spent on customers will go a long way when it comes to keeping them coming back for your product.
    This is how companies who are very successful market themselves. They realize there will be competition, and they use that to make themselves the top company in the market. Being the first one to start a product is a way to quickly become the number one company, but by spending time and effort to educate customers on your product, you will keep them from moving on to competitors.

  7. Carl Hakansson April 7, 2017 at 5:25 pm #

    This article by Seth Godin raises multiple interesting points regarding selling. As a salesperson, people oftentimes go about selling a product or service in the same exact way. This tends to bore the consumer, as nothing makes the product stand out. People need to be convinced to buy a product – it is rare that they are willing to accept that they are wrong and change products in order to make the right choice. So, as a salesperson, you need to do something differently that will help separate your product or service from the rest. In my opinion, this starts with selling yourself. The salesperson cannot change the product; the product is what it is. So, to make it stand out, the salesperson themselves must stand out. There is no need to change the product, just how the individual presents it. Marketing and selling really is about selling yourself rather than the product. Having a memorable presentation will help ingrain the product in people’s minds, and will surely help sell the product in the future, if not on the spot. Godin says that the key to growing is to reach your target audience early on, before they have committed to another product. As I have said, people are reluctant to admit they have made a wrong choice, which means it is harder to get them to switch products. People hate to admit that they are wrong, and it is common for people to stick with a worse product that they chose instead of admitting they made a mistake and switching to a product that is right for them. Godin brings up the interesting idea of telling the customer that they should buy your product not because they were wrong, but rather that they were under-informed. By doing this, the customer will not feel as though they made a mistake, but rather that it is the other company’s fault for not supplying enough information. This tactic will not make you put the blame on anyone else, but the customer will feel much better switching to your product because they will not feel as though they are stupid and made a wrong choice. Innovative thinking such as this will allow a salesperson to reach out to audiences in new ways, pulling themselves apart from their competitors while also reaching their audience properly. I am a big fan of this advice given by Seth Godin, as I feel using the same old marketing tactics that have been used for years is not helping people sell their products. As markets change, so do consumers. People are always looking for the newest and the trendiest things, and companies cannot always change their products to fit the bill. Therefore, marketing becomes essential to a company’s success because it will allow the company to have the appearance that they are the best, even if they are not. Presentation is everything, so if a salesperson can give the appearance that they are selling the newest and the latest goods, people will be much more willing to switch products.

  8. Derek Luckman April 7, 2017 at 5:27 pm #

    Very interesting article to read. I have always felt this same way about selling or as this article put it “unselling” , basically getting people to switch from a product they already purchased, to whatever it is I many be selling. The problem that I have, is that I am not a good sales person to begin with. I remember once having an interview where the possible employer put a pen in front of me and told me to sell her that pen as also tell her why that pen is better than the one she had in her hand. The question left me completely baffled. At this time I was a bit younger and not well versed in interviewing and maybe what type of questions I should be prepared for. I remember afterwards, I had called one my friends who had been in sales basically his entire life and asked for some advice on how to answer such a question. I remember telling him that I don’t feel comfortable in sales because I’m not a push person, if people are hassling me for a product I don’t want I get frustrated, so I assume others are the same. He told me that its not hassling them, he went on to say that most people don’t know what they’re missing out on and that its really just a point of informing them of the benefits that they aren’t missing. This really stuck with me because as simple as that advice sounds, it changed my entire perspective on product sales. When trying to sell a product that someone is newly in the market for, it’s tough sometimes, but certainly not as tough as trying to get customer that’s already in the market to switch products. As the article said people have a hard time admitting that they were wrong in their decision making, and to have change products would be the admittance of the fact that they made a mistake. When approaching a situation like this it is important to acknowledge the other product, but also let the customer know what they are missing out on by not going with your product. Another reason that the task is not very easy is because as the article mentioned that idea of pact thinking. Certain products will make you feel like a part of a community in which you feel the obligation to maintain some sort of loyalty to. For marketers it would be ideal to try to get someone to buy before they make any prior commitment to a product already in the market. The whole idea is that as humans, most of us want to feel like a part of something, and many of the things purchase are an expression of that. People form friendships on the basis of similarities, and our purchases help us to be able to identify with others. When dealing with people that are already a part of a specific :community” it is best to approach the situation with patience.

  9. Taylor Salomon April 7, 2017 at 7:03 pm #

    As humans, we are painted in a certain image. Athletes were born to run track, kick a soccer ball into a goal, or throw a football into the end zone. Teachers were natural born leaders who assists others in achieving a goal. One specific time I can recall learning is at Huntington Center. My guidance counselor suggested boosting my SAT score in order for me to get accepted into my dream schools. My ultimate weakness on standardized testing was math even though math is my favorite subject. I never understood the dilemma until I realized word problems were the culprit. I love mity experience at Huntington because they contributed to my score increase on the SAT. I would never trade this experience because Huntington Center helped me get into Seton Hall University.
    My time at Huntington was precious and “unselling”. The article mentions getting someone to switch to you is totally different from getting someone who’s new to the market to start using the solution you offer. When the author talks about switch, I got confused. Student Peter DeSantis provides an insightful background of the introduction. He states, “the author of the article “unselling,” defines the title as the process of getting someone to switch their ideas about something, in most cases a product. The object is to change someone’s mind in order to get them to agree with you or purchase the product you are selling. This is why it is called unselling. The customer has already been sold on the product he has and has potentially been using it for an elongated period of time. Now the goal of the salesman of the rival product somehow has to “unsell” that product to the customer and sell him on the competing product. His task is to inform the customer of this new other product and explain why it is better or more valuable than the one he currently has. This becomes quite a daunting task when the customer has a connection with his current product or if he has an intense love for the company, which makes his beloved products. It might sound crazy, but it happens. Some companies just make superior products compared to their competitors. When a consumer is looking for the perfect product and he finds it, he experiences a euphoria and can fall in love with the business that made it.”
    The authors supports his argument with excellent advice from a salesperson’s perspective. The author focuses in on a BMW motorcycle owner wanting to buy a Harley as his next bike. If you want it, then you have your work cut out for you. He continues by saying attachment is another factor to consider. One time he got emotionally involved with something, but realized that there was a better choice, so he switched. As a result, he was wrong and now he is right. That is contradicting. How can you be both right and wrong? I then realized it is possible to be both due to timing. Student Matt Radman examined this statement. He relates this to the opening statement of switching. He states, ““If you are marketing to people who will have to switch to engage with you, do it with intention. Your pitch of, “this is very very good” is insufficient. Your pitch of, “you need something in this category” makes no sense, because I am already buying in that category. Instead, you must spend the time, the effort and the money to teach me new information that allows me to make a new decision. Not that I was wrong before, but that I was under-informed.” Marketing to people already buying in an industry is different from new customers because of the whole idea of demand changes. People no longer need solutions; they need their best option.” I completely agree with him. People need to be better informed in tough situations. Seth shedded light on this dilemma.

  10. Owen Balseiro April 7, 2017 at 7:04 pm #

    Humans are many things, one of our most double edged traits is our stubbornness. Usually once one of us as made up our mind, it can become an almost impossible task to change it. ALmost all of us are guilty of this in some way or another. Whether it be Coke vs Pepsi Xbox vs Playstation vs PC, Democrat vs Republican and the myriad of other A vs B that our world is riddled with. People like to identify with a camp, it gives them a sense of belonging and that being one of our basic social cravings, can be a hard thing to undo. That is why when you convince someone to go from their side to yours. It is a feeling that is hard to replicate any other way. But doing that may seem like a simple task. All you have to do is convince someone to leave their circle, their “tribe” and move over to yours. But that act right there is not an easy one to accomplish. But there are routes to take that make that act, going a bit easier.

    Usually when a new product comes out or when to products are competing, the best way to get people to your camp is to get to them right before they start to learn what they want. Many people including myself will get a product and use it even if a better product is available. A great example would be windows operating system. Many people including myself loved windows 7, but when windows 8 came around many people did not wish to switch as they did not want to have to relearn some of the functions and just didn’t see the need to switch from something that worked so well for them. So when I got a new laptop and had to use windows 8 instead of 7, it was a bit of an annoyance at first, but now that I am used to it I don’t want to switch over to windows 10, because i just do not want to have to relearn functions again. And multiply that by millions pon millions of people and you can see why marketing to people can be really hard.

    So when you are talking to someone you have to go after them with full intention to win them over. Especially with certain markets where the supporters are very fanatic. You know those fanatic fan bases like which console to play video games on, Apple vs Android a great example would be Yankees vs Redsocks. But when you are trying to get someone from the apple camp to switch to the android camp, just saying that your product is very very good will not work. Because people are already attached to the choice they have made. You have to tell people why your camp is better than their camp and why switching would be beneficial. If you can not do this correctly, you’re going to have a hard time getting people to switch to your side.

    To successfully bring someone from another side to yours requires you to not only convince them that your side is better, but also that it is ok for that person to be wrong. Going back to what I said at the start, people are stubborn, like really stubborn and if you come off just even a bit high and mighty. They will dig their heels in and not budge because “why should that guy act all high and mighty, screw him, i am staying here.”

  11. Thomas Dellisanti April 7, 2017 at 8:06 pm #

    In this article, Seth Godin offers interesting insight into selling, or “unselling”. When people use a product or service that they like, they tend to stop looking at other products to use and focus on that one they like so much. If one product were reliable, it would be extremely difficult to get someone to switch to a new product, regardless if the product is better than that reliable product. I admit that when I use a product, it is very difficult for me to switch to a new product because I know that the product is reliable. For example, I have been using an iPhone for around 4 years, so if someone told me to switch to a Samsung phone because it is better, I would definitely keep the iPhone. Even if a Samsung phone improves on the iPhone, such as better battery life, I would still use the iPhone for a variety of reasons. One would be because I am already used to how the iPhone works, so I might not want to learn how a new phone works for minor improvements.

    Getting someone to change products is difficult because you have to convince someone that there are better products, especially if you are the one competing against the reliable product. Godin makes an interesting point in saying that switching to another product means admitting you were wrong, and the reason why you were attached to the original product in the first place was because of emotional attachment. I would not necessarily say that you need to admit you were wrong for using a product you liked, but it is difficult to admit that another product might be better than the one you like. If someone told me that a Samsung phone was better because it had better battery life or better pixel resolution, I would not be willing to admit it.

    Rival companies have a difficult job because they must be able to market their products well to get consumers to pick their product over the several competing companies. As Godin points out, they have an even harder job convincing someone to switch to their products after already becoming used to the rival company’s products. It is somewhat easier to convince someone to go to your product if they are not already committed to using any other similar product. There is no emotional attachment yet, so convincing the consumer that your product is the best should not be too difficult. However, if the consumer does use another product regularly, you have to convince them why yours is the best. As Godin mentions, a company cannot just say that their product is the best and expect consumers to instantly switch over to their product. They need to lay out concrete reasons as to why their product is better, and using the phones as an example, one company can say that along with better battery life and more storage space, there are certain features that you cannot get on the competing phone. Of course, it is up to the consumer to decide, and I admit that if I was shown how the product I use is flawed and how another one is better, I might consider switching.

  12. Thomas Batelli April 8, 2017 at 1:00 pm #

    In current American culture, one could probably agree that we are easily swayed into an opinion if it reaches us on an emotional, or otherwise relatable level. This can be a great thin for marketers, but not so great to the everyday individual. In a consumer society, marketers rely on their ability to relate to the consumer in order to increase profits. However, it may not be as easy as it seems. In order to create a profitable relationship between the buyer and the seller, the buyer must aim to create a trusting and reliable relationship with the consumer that makes them come back for more… right? Not necessarily. Studies have proven that many people have a hard time switching after they have already sold themselves to a company- whether it be a cell phone provider, internet provider, even a shoe company in which you continue to return back to. Once people have invested themselves into a particular idea, they have a hard time reversing. Why is that? Well, many people have a hard time admitting that they were wrong in their decision-making process. It takes an optimal marketing strategy to sway consumers from one plot to the other, in more cases than not. “We invent a status quo every time we settle on something, because we’d rather tell ourselves that we made a good decision than live with the feeling that we didn’t.”

    However, I personally find that millennial, and the generations to follow, are more open-minded to exhausting all their options before settling. This comes in many different forms, whether it is cosmetics, cell phone models and even grocer products. As I mentioned in the beginning, we have adapted into a culture that is easily impacted by trends and are easily influenced by the marketer’s ability to console. I know many people in my generation who change their opinions, products, companies simply because they want to achieve whatever is the “best of the best”. With technology on the move, I believe that younger people will constantly continue to be after the next best thing, more so for the sake of their self-image. Millennial want instant gratification in any way they can obtain it, and many marketing strategists understand this to the fullest. I think the concept of “un-selling” will grow to be easier as time goes on, because people are exposed to so many more options than they were even in our parent’s generation. There is so much more information at the disposal of anyone who wants to key in and listen. For example, nowadays, people are fixated on anything that is “vegan”, “gluten-free”, etc. Most of the time, trends turn out to be “fad diets”, but this paint a perfect picture of what I am trying to get across; people will believe anything that you tell them, and if they think that what you are offering will make them smarter, healthier, skinnier, or whatever it may be- nine out of ten times they are most likely going to be sold, especially younger folk. As we grow to be more “informed” on what is “right”, I believe that the issue of un-selling will slowly fade.

  13. Robert Seijas April 8, 2017 at 10:16 pm #

    The most fascinating thing about changing somebody’s mind and converting them to using a product which is not the brand that they regularly use is the mindset of the person in total. Many people have very strong and persistent loyalties to products and companies that they have used for long periods of time, and this is for very good reasons. The number one reason is that the consumer trusts the product that they are using above all else, and they actually trust the company supplying it as well. A great example of this is tide detergent, as it is in many homes and advertised as America’s number one detergent. This mindset is very accurate, as it is the best-selling detergent on the market, and is the first to come to most minds due to very high quality marketing campaigns. It is so stable as the number one detergent for America, that it can even thwart and avoid off mistrust and a dip in loyalty from accidentally poisoning children with the pods products. The products Tide sells that poisoned children were made to make washing clothes easier and more convenient, but actually looked very colorful and appealing. They appealed specifically to children, who thought they were candy as they saw them through the opaque boxes, and ate them. This was terrible and caused many children to go to the hospital to seek treatment for chemical poisoning. This would normally create a big dip in customer loyalty, as it can be seen as a dangerous product. This did not stop Tide from being the top, as they very quickly picked up the pieces and fixed the mistake made. They changed the packaging to promote safety, and made customers more loyal than ever.
    The mindset of a customer is the most interesting aspect of marketing, because that is what every single thing boils down to. It does not matter how fast a car can go, or how it may look, or whether or not a television has a certain resolution. The thing that is most important is that the product being sold, car or television is trusted by the customers and can appeal to them. Once the product or brand is trusted, there will be no problem for a company to get more of their products into the homes and grasps of consumers. A prime example would be somebody buying an iPhone because they are in love with their mac laptop. They trust apple to make good hardware, even if the same hardware could be made by a competitor like Microsoft, and they flock to that product chain.
    The most difficult thing to do is separate somebody from the brand they trust. This is almost impossible, because not only would the person have to admit to being wrong, like mentioned in the article, but the person would also have to buy all new things. That would take an emotional and monetary miracle, as people cannot easily change everything that they do and how they behave. Not only can they not, but they would never want to. The main thing to take away is trust, and how it can influence purchases, lack of purchases from competitors, retention, and even how families judge what others own.

  14. Filip Bizek April 10, 2017 at 1:06 pm #

    As always, Seth’s Blog is rather short but full of meaning. He discusses how to get someone who is new to the market to start using the solution you offer. This is a difficult task for any business, which is highly dependent on introducing new products to the consumers. Companies spend millions of dollars to figure out a way to make new consumers commit to their tribe. Some do it through aggressive advertisement on various social media platforms or TV and others do it through investing in skillful sales associates with the ability to convince the inconvincible.

    Let us begin with the social media advertisement. Undoubtedly speaking, ads on social media platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter can be extremely effective in getting new customer to join your camp. Imagine a new commercial promoting an iPhone. It shows a picture of the product and quickly pitches a 30-second elevator speech, thus it often proves to be extremely effective when those who are unfamiliar with the market are the target. However, how do you convince someone who has a Samsung to buy the iPhone? Realistically speaking, a YouTube ad will not be enough to sway him towards the Apple tribe. What company will need is exactly what we shall discuss in the next paragraph.

    On many occasions, companies such as Apple need boots on the ground to persuade a consumer belonging to a different tribe. As mentioned before, a 30-second ad doesn’t cut it. They need skilled sales associate with the ability to convince the buyer that an iPhone is in fact the best option from all the rest. With this in mind, how can an Apple sales person sell an iPhone to a Samsung cellphone owner? Well, the first step would require recognizing the already existing tribal links. Then make your pitch true and share the news. Moreover, I agree with the article clearly stating that starting a pitch with, “you need something in this category” does not make much sense. Obviously if they are speaking to you, they are already looking for something in that category. Thus, it is more efficient to focus on teaching the consumer new information about the product ultimately making him realize that perhaps he was under-informed on this subject.

    Personally speaking, there was a time when I was working as a part time sales associate in Staples. One of my primary tasks required me to promote the Kindle stocked on the shelves. Often enough, when speaking to the customers I would quickly realize they are team Apple and own an iPad. Therefore, selling became that much harder when speaking to an iPad owner. Surprisingly, with gaining more experience as a sales associate, I began to use the tips mentioned in the paragraph above more frequently. Instead of talking about the category itself, I was taking a role of a teacher educating a student on new information and ultimately letting him derive his own conclusions. Of course, this is not a guarantee formula, which always provides the same outcome. Just like in any other job, sometimes you will make it and sometime you will not. However, following the guidelines presented in Seth’s Blog can in fact improve your skill in actually closing a sale.

    http://blog.shannonweb.net/2017/04/04/unselling/

  15. Lauren Burbank April 14, 2017 at 7:42 pm #

    The first thing I thought of as I read this was the concept of buyer’s remorse. Buyer’s remorse can come from the amount of money spent, but I find that it’s often because of the feedback that those you trust give you. I have had many, many customers return something simply because their inner circle or “tribes” convinced them that they made the wrong decision, because their decision was not in alignment with what their tribe would choose. I agree that “people like us do things like this” is the most powerful marketing mantra available. People want to feel accepted, intelligent in their choices, and like they are a part of something.
    From a marketing perspective, it comes easy if your product is the “trend” in the industry. Apple will never have an in issue selling phones because it comes with a certain image, and although that image varies slightly from type of person to type of person, it’s widely seen as the best choice in a smartphone. When I need to overcome this mindset and get someone to switch from something they were very loyal to and held a network of people supporting their loyalty, I usually like to point out the highlights of the new product they were unaware of. I have found that the moment you tell someone, with fact behind it, something that contradicts a belief they previously held, they become more open to what you’re telling them. As long as your approach is not condescending, and more of a “I’m doing this to help you make the right choice for you” attitude, it can be very successful.
    For me personally, I like to designate people in my life as the “go to” person for different things. I have two friends who are a lot more tech-savvy than I am. They love reading articles and watching the latest news on growing technology. Some of their conversations make me feel like they’re speaking another language. Often their recommendations don’t align with what the general public is buying by the masses, but I like to think that I’m buying the product that has the most substance behind it. It’s because of the way they educate me on what their recommendation is the right choice that I’m open to it rather than going with what everyone else is buying. One specific example would be the Google Pixel XL phone. As I said, most people go for Apple, then second choice would be Samsung. Google’s name is great and has a lot of power behind it, but I was very hesitant to buy a phone that didn’t have a line of success before it. After being given detail after detail on all of the specs and why it would run smoother than most phones, I was convinced it was the right choice. I still believe that, about 6 months later because it is the first phone that I have never had technical issues with.
    I do this with everything. There are some industries I’ll trust my own judgment in, but I like having an “expert” friend who doesn’t base their choices on popularity or the common pick, but instead has the passion to really research the options and give a recommendation based on that research.

  16. John Zarro April 17, 2017 at 5:13 pm #

    This article on Seth’s Blog is just another informational tid-bit regarding something in life that the audience should know. Seth’s Blog is known for providing valuable information while being easy to read and straight to the point. This article in particular is in my opinion, one of the longer ones that Seth Goodin has posted. “Unselling” is the title and it starts off by talking about how convincing customers to switch over is much harder than getting someone to commit to the product that is brand new to the market. The main reason for this article titled “Unselling” by Seth Goodin on Seth’s Blog is to teach the audience ways to get customers to switch over to your own product.

    Seth’s first tip is the one he emphasizes the most. He states that the “best shot is to get in early, before people have made a commitment,” meaning that in order to grow quickly one needs to go after a cliental yet to be committed to another company. For example, say I use Verizon for a month or two and do not rave or love it. At this moment I am seen as a target because I am not fully committed to Verizon and there is still a chance to persuade me. We, as humans, are creatures of habit. Therefore, if I were in a routine of using Verizon for years, why would I want to switch to Sprint. In my eyes, it would only be a hassle and I would not see the benefits of switching over. Seth’s second tip is all about effort. He says that the pitch of “this is very good” is not acceptable when trying to persuade people. In this tip he is emphasizing the importance of showing that you are interested in the client. He stresses that lots of time must be spent along with money in order for customers to feel that they really need to switch over. This tip kind of relates to the customer’s comfort level as well. If a customer feels like they are wanted they will gravitate to where they are wanted. Seth’s last tip is short and simple like most of the articles on Seth’s blog. All this tip says is to stress the statement “people like us doing things like this” and then make it a reality. In order to really sell something, the seller needs to show that he/she uses the product and admires it to the fullest extent.

    Like usual, Seth’s Blog by Seth Goodin shared important advice and tips to his audience. However, this article in particular was a little lengthier than the usual, but still rather short and right to the point. Regarding what I previously stated above, marketing something to someone is very hard once they have already formed a commitment to something, therefore, the best way to grow rapidly is to attack clients with limited or no connections at all. The Verizon and Sprint example I created earlier in my comment perfectly explains the scenario. We love simple and easy, even if it comes at a price. Marketers arrive at my door all the time, but I know the price saved for switching over is not worth the hassle and exhaustion it takes to switch over. All in all, in order to switch, the reason for switching much be good enough to persuade the customer.

  17. Jiaqi Ma April 19, 2017 at 8:05 pm #

    It is refreshing to read Andrew’s comment especially when he talked about the innovation from the original article. Truly, it is quite hard to modify people’s mindsets when they hold the view for a long time and regarded it as truths. Once a person has developed a pattern of his own thinking, it is hard to change and transform. The definition of switching by Seth is “Admitting I was wrong, and, in many cases, leaving behind some of my identity because my tribe (as I see them) is using what I used to use.” Making mistakes are the most common things in our daily life. However, admitting our mistakes is so hard for us, ordinary people. It will be harder for the reputable people to admit that their decision or policy was wrong. The best example is recalling unqualified products. There were so many cases of Samsung Note 7 bombings. After many cases, the Samsung decided to recall all the unqualified phone finally. Samsung was afraid of admitting their mistakes.
    As for creation, Clayton M. Christensen once mentioned a theory: disruptive innovation. The difference, between sustaining innovation and disruptive innovation is the disruptive innovation is not only focus on the technological changes?but also the changes of “value system”, which means that the way that people used to estimate changes in product standards. Competitors who fail to catch this change will fail.

    ‘360’ is a Chinese well-known network security platform. It is a good example on this issue. 360 is the green bird when it first stepped into the anti-virus software. 360 faced various enemies such as Kaspersky, red umbrella, and Jinshan. Many other domestic and foreign platforms did not take measures for developing a better anti-virus engine and launching a wider market campaign. Ordinary people would regard it as the competitive strategy. In another aspect, for the management of rogue software, 360 have developed the market quickly and expanded the impact, which is the market that other anti-virus software vendors did not focus on ever. The next step of 360 is to declare a comprehensive free. You do not have to pay a penny for this platform with enjoying their services. In public view, this would kill 360’s future because the innovation did not bring dollars to them. However, 360’s behavior forced other domestic platforms to give up tens of millions sales revenue. This behavior completely changed the security software industry in China. 360 have broken the old order played in China. 360 succeeded to become subversive. If 360 is not using the “destructive principles of innovation”, doing the customer survey step by step just like another platform, try to develop the “better” anti-virus software, I am afraid of it will be only enabled to share one cup of water in the security software industry ocean. Moreover, for the platform of Jinshan, Rising and Jiangmin, as the representative of the domestic anti-virus software vendors, they perhaps never imagined that the rules in this industry have played for more than ten decades, it would be instantly destroyed by a green bird for several years. 360 is a very useful platform for the harass phone call and fraudulent phone call. I also curious about how 360 make a profit because of the platform is completely free.
    Innovations usually overlooked by large enterprises, but it enable to open a new market, and it could subvert the old pattern. Therefore, for some respect, it is necessary to change our mind to adjust the development. Sometimes, when we break the old pattern, we could have the surprise that we never expected.

  18. Anthony Laverde April 20, 2017 at 5:13 pm #

    This explanation of why people decide to switch products or companies within the same market when the product is the same or similar was very interesting, and although that can and is the case many times, it is not the only reason for switching brands. For example, this article details switching motorcycle brands because one is better, and his hypothetical person admitted to his new choice being better, and his previous mentality being completely wrong. These comments and mentality, in my opinion, completely wrong and the option is much more objective that subjective, which is the argument this article is essentially making.

    The notion that switching brands is completely subjective or, based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions. Again, I realize that personal tastes and opinions do play a role in making these sorts of decisions, but they are not, or should not be, the driving force behind one’s decision. Being objective about this is much more beneficial, and that involves not influenced by personal feelings or opinions in considering and representing facts. For example, I will use the example of switching cars to a Prius. For further details, refer to this article:

    http://www.autoblog.com/2015/09/10/why-toyota-prius-la-best-car/

    When the Prius came to market, there was no denying how revolutionary the car was, regardless of personal opinion. It got, and continues to get upwards of 40 miles to the gallon on a highway, which is much better than most other cars on the market. It also sparked the creation of many other Hybrids, which was manufactured by all the car companies, including Lexus, Honda, and various others besides Toyota. However, It only does 40+ miles per gallon when in between a certain mile per hour range of speed. Along with that, the body of the car has been historically distasteful to many people, and is a reason many people shy away from purchasing one.

    Lastly, how do you think a Prius would drive on the east coast compared a heavy duty jeep or truck? The answer is it wouldn’t stand a chance. Despite getting almost triple the miles per gallon, it means nothing if the car cannot move. The weather example is very specific to one situation, but that is the point of my entire argument. While a Prius might be a better fit for driving in Los Angeles in the summer, it is not the better fit for driving in Boston in the middle of a snow storm. Different items and products are better in different situation; however, that does not mean switching between products is a self realization that you had been wrong with your previous actions. Each item could have aspects of it that is better than its competition, while also lacking in others. There is no practical way to analyse every aspect of a product and decide it is without a doubt better than another because it is all situation based. Although I see where the author of the article is coming from, but the over exaggeration of self realization of one’s past mistakes when switching products is a bit over the top, and not at all relatable to the average person. I believe people switch due to the unique situations they find themselves in at the time, choosing to go with the better product in that situation, not the overall better product, because that becomes a subjective opinion.

  19. Nick Shervanian April 21, 2017 at 5:21 pm #

    I admit that when I use a product, it is very difficult for me to switch to a new product because I know that the product is reliable. If one product were reliable, it would be extremely difficult to get someone to switch to a new product, regardless if the product is better than that reliable product. In this article, Seth Godin offers interesting insight into selling, or “unselling”. When people use a product or service that they like, they tend to stop looking at other products to use and focus on that one they like so much. I have been using an iPhone for around 4 years, so if someone told me to switch to a Samsung phone because it is better, I would definitely keep the iPhone. Even if a Samsung phone improves on the iPhone, such as better battery life, I would still use the iPhone for a variety of reasons. One would be because I am already used to how the iPhone works, so I might not want to learn how a new phone works for minor improvements. Getting someone to change products is difficult because you have to convince someone that there are better products, especially if you are the one competing against the reliable product. Godin makes an interesting point in saying that switching to another product means admitting you were wrong, and the reason why you were attached to the original product in the first place was because of emotional attachment. I would not necessarily say that you need to admit you were wrong for using a product you liked, but it is difficult to admit that another product might be better than the one you like. If someone told me that a Samsung phone was better because it had better battery life or better pixel resolution, I would not be willing to admit it. Rival companies have a difficult job because they must be able to market their products well to get consumers to pick their product over the several competing companies. As Godin points out, they have an even harder job convincing someone to switch to their products after already becoming used to the rival company’s products. It is somewhat easier to convince someone to go to your product if they are not already committed to using any other similar product. There is no emotional attachment yet, so convincing the consumer that your product is the best should not be too difficult. However, if the consumer does use another product regularly, you have to convince them why yours is the best. As Godin mentions, a company cannot just say that their product is the best and expect consumers to instantly switch over to their product. They need to lay out concrete reasons as to why their product is better, and using the phones as an example, one company can say that along with better battery life and more storage space, there are certain features that you cannot get on the competing phone. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion about a product but you cannot opinionate fact. If there are facts to make me re think my choice in product, then obviously I will be more likely to switch. There just needs to be solid evidence.

  20. Evan Costello April 21, 2017 at 6:29 pm #

    If the term creature of habit could be applied to someone, it absolutely would be me. When I find a product, a store, or a business person that I like, it is going to take a lot for me to change which product or person I choose. For example, I have 1 barber, I go to one grocery store, and I use one kind of shampoo and one kind of laundry detergent. Once I establish a product that I like, it is beyond difficult for me to change my mind. I do not like change, and I do like reliability and consistency. Using or switching from multiple products bothers me. If anyone, not just a sales person, could harness the ability to change someone as stubborn as I from switching from one product to another would be a dangerous talent indeed. For example, if Samsung could possibly figure out a way to switch more than ten percent of iPhone users to the galaxy smartphone products, their profits would be doubled. I know quite well that the average iPhone user has been a returning user for the past few models. I myself have been a customer of Apple since the iPhone 4s to the 5s to the 6 and now the 7. For Samsung to break me of that habit would be outstanding for their sales. By and large, the retail world is a popularity contest. The best product is often not the product that is the most profitable. iPhone screen crack all too easily, and there are several other problems that come months down the road for the user such as a diminishing battery. However, Apple makes the sexiest product with the most popular consumer response, which is why the customers keep coming back again and again. The author of this post is absolutely correct, it is vastly harder to convince someone to try a different product than the one they are accustomed to rather than just introducing a new product. For example, selling a car to someone who does not own a car is easier than selling Toyota to someone who already has a Nissan. Solid evidence, profound acceptance, and reputable brand recognition could help in persuading a customer to switch products, but even then, ‘unselling’ is a very difficult task.

  21. Cayla Andican April 25, 2017 at 12:59 pm #

    Usually, when someone is committed to a certain brand or a particular store, it is hard to convince him or her to switch it up. They are so familiar with one item, and knowing that it is satisfying, why change? For example, every time I go to chipotle, I get the same exact order; I never change any part because I know that what I get will satisfy me and I will enjoy my meal. If I were to get something else and not like it, it would ruin my experience, so to play it safe I get the same order each time. Seth’s blog, “Unselling”, makes a good observation when he points out that people would rather tell themselves that they have made a good decision that to live with the feeling that they did not, and I could not agree more.
    It is a lot easier to sell a product to a new customer than it is to tell to an old customer. People do not usually change their routine after they found their preferred choices. Makeup, for example, is something people use to their preference. Once they pick a product, brand, and color that they like, they will most likely continue to use the same until it either runs out of is recalled. People are usually loyal to a product because they know it will maximize their satisfaction and because they have been using it they know it will not disappoint.
    As a marketing major, I feel as if marketing is an important part in going business. Persuading people to lean towards a certain brand or product can be challenging; if a customer is committed to something, it is the marketers’ job to change their mind. In Seth’s blog, he gives important advice to marketers and advertisers. He recommends getting into people’s mind before they have made a commitment to something, but once they are committed, it will be more difficult to persuade them otherwise. He also suggests that people are not interesting in hearing why they need the particular product or why it is so great, they want to be educated and informed about new information that could potentially alter their opinion of another product.
    As a student and marketing major, I really found this blog post valuable. These tips are helpful for companies to become successful in marketing themselves. It is crucial to know the opinions of the people and to take them into consideration when trying to market a product.

  22. Guy Barbano April 28, 2017 at 12:51 pm #

    I can honestly admit I am a very brand loyal person. It is just who I am. No matter what if I know what I am getting for my dollar I will go and spend. I am very unwilling to switch on certain things. It is just how I am. For 19 years I have gotten my hair cut at one place, Rocky’s barber shop. I always have and it is now said to say I have to find a new place since my barber rocky ha retired. My grandfather went to rocky my dad went to rocky and I went to rocky. Now, since he retired last month I have not gotten my hair cut since. This though shows the loyalty people have when it comes to certain things you sometimes cannot get someone to just change something. I see this idea though everyday with people not just myself. Back home I work at a hockey shop. People are always coming and buying new equipment or sticks. Only thing is Bauer and CCM (two major hockey company’s) come out with a new product line every year and people always go into a panic because they refuse to get the new model because it isn’t the same as the one they were used to. With the same old saying I have to tell people every year is “this year’s product is the same as last year’s just a little a different but a lot lighter” or whatever the new “cool” design or technology they have. The point is though this really shows how un-selling someone off of something else and selling them on else. Is harder than in looks. Yes people bit at the idea when you say it is cheaper but you also get the people who say if it is cheaper it the quality must not be there. There are pros and cons of selling everything. With this though comes customer loyalty when you sell a product or idea you the customer to come and back and give you more business to put food on your table. This cannot fully be seen with my experience working but it can however be seen through my old barber. Back when I use to go with my father as a young boy. We use to have to wake up at 5am every day to wait in a 20 person line to get a haircut. Rocky was a one chair barber that worked from 5am to 7pm everyday cash only. On Saturdays though between the hours of 5am to 11am he made a killing. I could not possibly make up a number. All I know is people liked rocky and they came back. It showed the loyalty and appreciation they had for Rocky. People want what they believe to be the best and most affordable options they can get. With my barber many people believed he gave one of the best haircuts in New Haven County. So when it comes to trying to having someone switch brands or places they go. Think it over first because it may be harder than it looks.

  23. Matthew R Ponsiglione April 30, 2017 at 8:55 pm #

    Trying to sell someone on something they are not used to is not an easy task and Godin does a good job explaining this. One of the things he suggests doing is getting people to make a switch before they are fully invested in their decision, whether their decision is buying a product, or the way they go about doing something. If you can quickly convince them before they believe their original choice was the right one there is a good shot you will be able to sell them on it. Secondly he talks about the approach you have to take when trying to convince someone to take the other option. Once someone is already invested in their choice it will be a hard time for you to convince them to change their ways. Many people are arrogant and selfish in a way, we all are. Nobody ever wants to believe they are wrong or that they made the wrong decision on something. So when you are trying to convince someone of this you need to do everything you can to prove your option to be better. For example, and android salesman is trying to sell the new android to a 5 year IPhone user. The android salesman can talk about how fast the phone can travel the web and all the unlimited apps the phone can have. The IPhone user will not be interested in any of this simply because the IPhone can do all of these things already. You need to bring things up that show the customer why you are there and why your product is better, give them something they do not know. Another reason people are so hesitant to make a switch is because whatever it is, it has become the status quo. This has become what they are used to and if they change something they are not sure how it will affect them. This makes the process of selling these people so difficult because people are afraid of change, they do not want to step outside of their comfort zone, so in order to make them do this you have to not only make a good argument for yourself, but make them believe they should have been on your side the whole time. If you can do this you will for sure be able to sell someone on whatever it is you are pitching to them. I am a big victim of the arrogance I talked about earlier. I take a stance and I do not like to stray from it. I like to tell myself I am willing to make change and admit when I am wrong but it is much easier said than done. I am a believer that when I make a decision the decision is made and I have to stick with my decision no matter what even if I know I am wrong, because what also comes with admitting you are wrong is a form of humility. In a way it humbles you and many people do not like to be humbled or humiliated. When it comes to admitting you are wrong it is no easy task and once you do that things will start.

  24. Adis Hoti September 21, 2017 at 8:50 pm #

    Seth Godin’s article, “Unselling,” discusses how providing services to customers is a difficult job. Godin says, “Getting someone to switch to you is totally different from getting someone who’s new to the market to start using the solution you offer.” To be able to recruit customers to use your services or equipment that are new to the market is difficult enough but getting customers to leave their old provider is even harder. There must be something you are offering that will help persuade a customer to leave their provider. An example of how difficult this could be is getting a haircut. If your barber does a good job on your hair each time, then you develop trust in your barber. You have no reason to leave that barber that you trust for another. How do other barbers compete? Usually they bring in people that are new to the market or new to the area. Sometimes a person moves and needs a more convenient location, so they make the switch. Usually it is not that simple. Advertising and marketing plays a huge role. A barbershop that I used to attend when I was younger used to cut hair for the New York Giants, so most males were attending this barbershop. Another great example of this is the iPhone. The iPhone runs the cellphone markets. Getting someone to switch from apple to Samsung is nearly impossible in today’s market. IPhones are easy to use opposed to other powerful cellphone’s such as Android and Samsung. Samsung and android both offer certain things that apple does not, however, users trust apple so they do not switch.
    Things must be done quickly in the sales industry. Godin says, “if you seek to grow quickly, realize that your best shot is to get in early, before people have made a commitment, built allegiances and started to engage in cognitive dissonance (since I picked this one, it must be good).” If you persuade someone quick, then they have a chance at committing towards you. Once they have committed somewhere else then the chance they switch to you is slim considering they believe they made the correct decision.
    As a sales person, you must provide a better explanation as to why the customer needs to start using your product or services. This may require money, but it will show the customer not that they were wrong, but misinformed. To get people to switch over to you, it must be done with intention. If you are marketing to people who will have to switch to engage with you, do it with intention. Godin says, “your pitch of, “this is very very good” is insufficient. Your pitch of, “you need something in this category” makes no sense, because I’m already buying in that category.” As I said previously, you must say something that makes the customers believe they need to switch over to you.
    Godin also talks about how once we made one decision we stick to it. We close our mind to all other options that we have because we feel we made the right decision. This ultimately makes us lose out on a lot of good opportunities and deals that are right for the customer. Godin says, “we invent a status quo every time we settle on something, because we’d rather tell ourselves that we made a good decision than live with the feeling that we didn’t.” Being close-minded limits customers of many things just because they do not want to believe that they were wrong.
    http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/03/unselling.html

  25. Greg D'Ottavi October 20, 2017 at 2:07 pm #

    This article from Seth Godin’s blog points out various interesting points about sales and the nature of humans in decision-making. Naturally, humans do not ever want to believe that the choice they made was not the best choice or that they are wrong about something. With that said, it is often hard to sell a new product to a customer who already has a similar or competing product. People hate being told that what they have is not as good as the alternative because it forces them to believe that they made the wrong decision and this is hard for humans to accept. Godin, in his post, suggests that a sales person should pitch their product by telling the consumer that they did not make the wrong choice before, but that they made the uniformed choice. Essentially, if you begin to educate the consumer about your product and convince them that they were under-informed about the products in a particular category then they are more likely to switch.
    After reading this post, I began to think about times when I may have switched or was persuaded by a sales person to change products. One that stuck out in my memory was the time I changed where I get my haircut. I know this does not seem like a major situation, but now that I have switched, it is very unlikely that I will ever go anywhere else. I distinctly remember the first time my friend told me to come sit in while he got his haircut and think about whether or not I wanted to get mine cut as well. I had previously only gone to one place to get it cut every time before, but I instantly became sold on switching minutes after arriving. Something that stuck out to me while I was sitting in the barbershop was the barbers themselves and the way they produced the atmosphere. It is not necessarily the nicest place ever, nor is it the biggest, but the way each of them went about their work made a huge impact on my decision. I believe it is very important for any sales person who is trying to get consumers to switch to not only sell the product, but sell themselves as well. It makes a significant difference to a consumer when the sales person goes above and beyond any other competitor. It is impossible to change a particular product for the better during a sales pitch, but it is not impossible to make oneself stand out amongst all others selling the same products.
    Godin wraps up his post by stating that no matter what, we will always set a status quo on something because we would rather tell ourselves that we made the best decision rather than living with the possibility that we did not. As I said before, humans do not like being told they are wrong or that they made the wrong choice. It can also be difficult for someone to accept that they have made the wrong decision even after switching to a different product. In my opinion, I agree with Godin in that the best way to go about selling a product or getting a consumer to switch is by informing them. Simply telling someone that they are wrong will not make them want to switch, but informing them so they can see the difference and make the better choice will.

  26. Tori Breazeale February 16, 2018 at 10:56 pm #

    This article summarizes the complexities of selling a piece of merchandise and/or a new idea. Due to intense barriers of resistance that consumers create, it can be extraordinarily difficult to sell your idea or product to the target market. Consumers, generically, go into a place of retail with one of two mindsets: to reduce cost or to retrieve the best possible product. These competitive strategies are also utilized and “sold” in the place of retail. To provide the best possible service is essential in achieving the ultimate successes in selling. I do agree. It isn’t the products as much as it is the service. Brand loyalty is influenced by brand image, however, it is more about the experience of retrieving a product rather than the product itself. The ability to communicate and engage your customers is essential in the act of selling.

    The act of selling is universal. It is an active component in the average person’s life, including both in one’s personal and professional lives. According to a business professional, well-respected professor, and mother of two children, the act of selling is involved in most business practices including those of accounting and finance. These fields are not all about data crunching, but selling a pitch to influence clientele as well as business partners. As far as our personal lives are concerned, we are always trying to appeal to our friends.

    The average person, adolescents especially, are encouraged to follow the latest trend. Trends have an everlasting impact on sales today due to its elasticity and/or ability to experience frequent change. Due to this capability, I do not agree that we simply settle on products. People are captured by more products, more brands, and ever more frequently than ever before due to technological advances. Most of the society has adapted to an online era. We can not help and/or resist clicking onto the pop-up advertisements. These can be considered advancements in pitching. The pop-up boxes are outlined in color and generally display bold lettering to grasp the consumers attention. They are accessible to everyone. If we are told that this is the way things are and everyone is doing it then we all resort to that specific product and/or product line. Not because it is easier: Everyone else is doing it. Thus, status quo is ever-changing and revolves around what everyone else is doing.

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