Business Is Likely To Reshape Higher Ed

from Brookings

It’s broadly understood that a college degree or its equivalent is crucial to making it into the middle class in America. But getting those qualifications can be a risky process for many young Americans from a modest income background. Indeed, just 9 percent of young people from the lowest income quartile will ever earn a college degree. But even completing a degree does not necessarily mean a graduate will receive the skills they need to succeed in today’s workforce. That’s because of a profound disconnect between many college administrators and recruiters for business about what is needed. Just 11 percent of business leaders believe college graduates are properly equipped for entering the workforce – while 96 percent of college’s chief academic officers feel they turn out work-ready graduates.

There are trends in higher education, however, that point to closer links between business and higher education – trends that will make degrees more affordable as well as better aligned with needed workforce skills. And with a businessman about to enter the White House, expect these trends to get a boost from Washington.

More here.

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30 Responses to Business Is Likely To Reshape Higher Ed

  1. Jiaqi Ma January 16, 2017 at 3:00 pm #

    With Donald Trump almost president, this article is very applicable to what will happen in the next few years. America’s business influence shows potential college policies are on the rise. The president of the United States will have a great opportunity to make businesses reshape higher education in the entire country. Changes are more likely to happen now than ever before because Trump, a well-known business man, has advantage over the House of Representatives and the Senate.(“Party Divisions of the House of Representatives* | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives”). Some of these changes are very exciting to me, for they will affect me, as a current college student. I will be glad to see some of the revisions in higher education because I feel that there are many flaws in the current educational system. For instance, if more colleges begin to work with employers, students will have a chance to increase work experience before they even leave college. I think it is very important that students work close with the employers because employers can offer valuable advice to the students pursuing the same career. Since only 11 percent of business leaders believe students are ready to enter the workforce, there is so much work to be done to really prepare each student for success in her/his profession. It may be a good idea to let business leaders teach certain courses, to really show what some jobs entail. Also, this is a great chance for students to network with professionals to increase their chances of employment. Another great business influence is the potential financial aid that would come from businesses and organizations instead of relying solely on the government aid. It would be beneficial for both students and the government. The government would not have to focus so much money on education, which would decrease the state debt. For students, they may have more financial offers from company that may hire them. Unfortunately, this will bring more pressure on the student because they may have to work harder in case the companies providing aid build contracts with students. Some students may not be able to change their mind about their major or field of study. In China, many teachers receive financial aid to study abroad but they will sign a contract which binds them to stay for five years, without the option to quit their job. On the bright side, students would have more guarantees. Many students are trying to find one job that has very limited openings. Even worse, many students aren’t even sure if they will graduate on time. I think it is very encouraging for students to be guaranteed a certain graduation date. However, this may cause more stress for everyone. The counselor would have to worry about many students who need to graduate on time. For the students, failure may not be an option. Some of students really need time to fit college life, but it may be nearly impossible will all the added stress.
    Reference:
    “Party Divisions of the House of Representatives* | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives.” Party Divisions | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Jan. 2017.

  2. Jonathan Cavallone January 17, 2017 at 10:05 pm #

    This article by Stuart Butler really caught my attention for many reasons. Students go to college for one main purpose, and that is to get a high paying job once they graduate. As stated in the article, going to college in modern society can be quite risky. Students can waste countless years in school when they can be using that time to be making money. In addition, they can spend tens of thousands of dollars on their college education only to be unemployed after that investment. A college education is a way for students to invest in themselves. A higher education’s purpose is to make students more desirable and sought after by businesses. However, when you examine the education system implemented in the United States, it really has not changed much over the many years it has been in existence. When observing businesses, it is obviously how much they have changed over the years. This raises concerns for myself, as well as employers. Students of higher education such as college degrees are more unprepared for the real world work scene than ever before. This is a problem that Professor Shannon has emphasized strongly in the first class we had with him. After hearing what he had to say, and after reading this article, I believe it is time to make changes to prepare us college students more efficiently for work after school. Only eleven percent of business leaders believe college students are properly equipped for the workforce directly out of college. That number is unbelievably low and college’s need to take action. One-step that a few colleges are taking is working directly with employers to see what they are looking for. If all colleges did this I would be more confident in my education here at Seton Hall University. Being forced to take classes such as Intro to Bible, Journey of Transformation, and many others I feel is unnecessary to my success in the work force. The most effective way to learn how to do a job is through firsthand experience like internships. I know learning through hands on activities help me learn most efficiently and I am sure that applies to most other students as well. Many colleges have the resources and opportunities for students to land internships including Seton Hall University. Unfortunately, many lazy students in college just do not take advantage of these opportunities. Students that have participated in internships are undoubtedly more prepared for work than those that have not. I believe that today’s employers think that a college education is mandatory for just about all levels of work that exclude flipping burgers at McDonalds. However, instead of wasting four plus years away at college and tens of thousands of dollars, all students need is some hands on experience. Once I began trading stocks on my own I learned more in a few months and talking with my broker on the phone than I learned in all my years of high school and college to date. I am not saying college is a waste of time and money, but changes need to be made to the education system to keep college students employed.

  3. Michelle Pyatnychuk January 18, 2017 at 1:59 pm #

    The fact that there are issues with our current education system is obvious. Students subject themselves to large amounts of debt in order to get degrees in majors that they find interesting themselves but after graduating; realize that current employers do not. It is not only the fault of the labor system that after graduating, 9% of young people from the lowest income quartile will have learned skills that will not be useful in the workforce but also the fault of the individual. Being that this country is still recovering from the Great Recession of 2008, there has to be some judgement from the student’s perspective about the major that they will be pursuing and accumulating debt from but it is also up to their own judgement that they choose a university that is right for them.

    Besides the point that unreasonable majors will only hurt students entering the workforce, there still lies an issue with those who were granted degrees in fields that are always looking for perspective employees such as the business and medical field. Although these graduates have an easier time getting the job, it is keeping the job that gives them the most trouble. Since 11% of business leaders, hiring graduates from colleges and universities, find that the former students that they hire are unequipped to be working in a professional environment that should be an instant wake up call to the nation’s top schools, at least, to take the time to step back and reevaluate their curriculum. The goal of a university and earning a diploma is that once one graduates, they will have earned and learned skills that will benefit them in their future. That being said, when the institution that you are going into debt for does not give you the skills you need to keep the job, let alone get the job, then the school is not doing something right.

    In order to become a professional in a specific field, students should, as Jonathan suggested, be more involved with their major from day one. Due to the education system’s way of wringing every last penny out of you, students are required to take those core classes that have no significance to their major, in order to graduate with a certain amount of credits. By enabling students to experience their major’s 101 classes during their first semester, students will be able to, right away, decide whether this is the right job for them or something that they should switch out of in order to pursue something, of value, in another career. Moreover, the best way to prepare students for their future careers, is by providing workshop classes or credits. There are many universities, like Seton Hall, that provide workshops in various skills of the business field for example but by creating classes that are worth credits, then the school can ensure that when leaving the university, graduates will be prepared to take on whatever task lies ahead for them.

    With the business community wanting to bind together and unite in order to shape future business leaders, they are playing a more crucial part in helping graduates get and maintain their jobs in their future and as a result, will only create people that are sharper and more attentive to their careers than ever before.

  4. Thomas Dellisanti January 18, 2017 at 2:03 pm #

    While reading this article, I was very surprised at the amount of students that are not actually ready to participate effectively in the business world. Considering that chief academic officers are expecting a very large majority of their graduates to be ready for the business world, there are major discrepancies in what they think the graduates should know for the business world as opposed to the business leaders. I think that this is because going to school now is more about passing than learning. Many students are more concerned with their letter grade than the material that is being taught to them. There are some professors and teachers that want their students to be active and prepared for the real world, but not all professors take this approach.
    Students that go to college just to get by with a passing grade can be setting themselves up for failure. Being content with just passing means not doing all the assigned work or not fully paying attention in class. By doing this, the students are not prepared for a job outside of college, which means that they are effectively wasting their time and money. When colleges are so expensive to attend, this could potentially be a major mistake because if the student cannot earn a job, they could go into very serious debt without any means to pay.
    Businesses that collaborate with colleges to inform the students properly of the business world is an excellent and practical idea. By giving students a more accurate representation of the real business world, these classes could help either spark an even further interest in the subject or help the student decide that this field of work is not for them. As a student, I would very much like to take one of these courses because I have an understanding of business itself but not how businesses operate. I agree with Jonathan’s response to meaningless courses that we have to take as part of our requirements as opposed to productive business courses. We would never need to use the knowledge that we are acquiring in these classes in the business world. Replacing these classes with only one or two classes that are provided by an actual business could be extremely beneficial both during college and in the workforce. By finishing these classes, students could potentially have a job as soon as they graduate college.
    Businesses that provide classes in college not only help the students that attend them but also help the colleges themselves. Having this type of specialty could be a major selling point for aspiring business students. Because the students would be receiving some of the best education available, the college could be able to raise the price of tuition without risking decreased enrollment. There would always be a high demand for quality education, and offering this unique opportunity could be extremely profitable for the colleges.
    The direct involvement of businesses in education is a very important aspect in getting students ready for the business world. By teaching what the employers expect from their employees, their college education becomes that much more effective. I think that if more colleges offered this type of education, more students would have a better understanding of what field of work they want, which would make the number of total graduates rise significantly. In addition, since students would be more prepared, that number of 11% would rise, causing businesses to run more smoothly and more efficient.

    • Michelle Pyatnychuk January 18, 2017 at 9:27 pm #

      I agree with you about the motivation that lies within students nowadays. Students do not seem to care about the value in what they are learning. In classes where what they are learning will be of value to them, such as any finance course for a business major or any science course for an English major, it is important that they are consuming that information. With students today studying for major exams the night before them, copying their homework from their roommates or spending more time out in town than in the library, they are limiting themselves from their true potential. Of course, there are issues with the current education system, students do have to take seemingly trivial courses in order to graduate and pay obscene prices just to get through these four years but this should serve as a motivator in doing well. When you are spending thousands upon thousands of dollars on a quality education, studying for that trivial course that you can maybe gain something from should be more important than getting that A. In the end, there will be courses that you will have to take that will not be easy, courses that require you to put all your effort and energy into just to pass with a B but it is through that constant hard work and determination that you will develop a stronger work ethic.

      Colleges are responsible for preparing you for your future career but they are not the only ones. Students rely too heavily on the aid of other people, professors and counselors and because of this, are not able to prepare themselves for their futures. Without putting the pressure on yourself to work and put work into strenuous tasks, then students will not survive in the professional world. No one will be there to hold your hand through the hard times in life and you learn this quickly in college. However, you cannot learn this in college without applying yourself to the courses in front of you. As you said, students have stopped applying themselves by taking “easy” classes that require minimal work. How can a graduate going into the work force be prepared to take on the professional world without ever being challenged in life? Sure employers and business leaders look for high GPAs in perspective employees but what better way to explain your sub par GPA than with a story about the challenging classes that you took as a student and all of the skills that you had acquired as a result? Even the business leaders in the article would much rather prefer someone who knows what they are doing over someone with the high GPA. There is always a way to turn a negative into a positive and as a college student you have to learn to look at the bright side.

      The current job market does pose problems for graduates leaving school with thousands of dollars in debt but if students now take a focus in their education, working to better the curriculum at their school if they feel it is subpar and challenging themselves to take courses that at one point they never would, future graduates can feel a sense of relief that even though getting that job might take a few months, in the end, they will be able to bring to that job four years of developed skill and wit.

    • Nicholas Thomas January 27, 2017 at 2:54 pm #

      I completely agree that part of the major difference between the expectations of skills according to professors versus business leaders, stems from the student perspective of college. Many people attend college because it is what is expected of them. Once in college these same people put in enough effort to pass because they have no reason to put in maximum effort. I believe all of these assumptions come from the idea that college is a way to a “better” life and more opportunities. I agree with you about the values of students however, I believe you do not put enough emphasis on the higher education system itself. Higher education was never meant to give people more opportunities for a “better” life. Originally, the purpose of higher education was to mold young men and women into “gentlemen” and “ladies.” The issue now is that the expectations of college have changed while the system itself has not. The advantage to businesses getting involved with higher education is that the businesses can help change the system of college. The result of changing the system would be more students properly equipped to find a career and apply the skills that they have. As you addressed, one of the ways businesses could prepare students for the working world is having major work directly with business groups that way the student know exactly what will be expected for a career. Moreover, even if a student decides not to go into a particular field after working with a business group, he or she was able to practice networking. Networking is a vital skill to have yet; many students lack it because they are never in a situation where they need it. You also mention that colleges have too many core-required classes that take away from a student’s time to develop skills that are more relevant. To add to your point it is the responsibility of students to expose themselves to various fields if they are unsure of their interests. Another benefit of business groups working with students is that students receive an authentic experience of that field and can decide if they like it or not. The opportunity of networking is an advantage all students could benefit from.
      As you can see I agree with most of what you have written however, I believe the focus of your blog post is too concerned with the benefit students receive from business groups working with higher education establishments. This whole time we have been discussing how to prepare students for a career after college so why not equip professors with tools to help their students? Professions could also benefit from the relationship of college and businesses. I purpose that some businesses should host small workshops for professors to attend so that the expectations of businesses and professors match. Businesses have skills that they require from potential employees, but professors, at least some, have the aptitude to teach the skills. Businesses set the expectations, professors convey the expectations, and students practice the skills.

  5. Daniel Anglim January 19, 2017 at 2:34 pm #

    In today’s world it seems almost impossible to obtain a well-paying job without higher education. Since elementary school my parents have prioritized the need for education in order to be successful in the future. I decided to become a Business major with a concentration in mathematical finance at Seton Hall University. The difficulty of my degree will hopefully set me apart from the millions of other Business majors I will be competing with to acquire internships and jobs. A degree from a university no longer guarantees employment. That being said, when choosing a school people are looking at the universities ability to create a well-rounded individual, that will be ready to work after four years of education. Colleges are looking at ways to entice students to come to their school by offering guarantees like, “a student will finish in four years, or the college will swallow the cost of additional semesters, to some colleges offering guarantees that graduates will be able to find employment with a certain income.” These guarantees are something new not previously offered by colleges. People want a guarantee that they will be getting their money’s worth for the education they receive. Many colleges claim that they prepare students for the workforce, but when business leaders are asked about the performance of college graduates “only 11% believe college graduates for properly equipped to enter the workforce.” People are not willingly going to spend tens of thousands of dollars on an education that does not prove to be useful. College guarantees are going to become essential in the future for getting students to join their schools.

    Colleges are working with employers to see exactly what they expect from new employees. Colleges are creating programs like, “College for America, part of Southern New Hampshire University, which has customized partnerships with a broad range of employers, including Aetna, the Gap and the District of Columbia government.” The acceleration in programs like the College for America are critical in transforming students into employees. More universities will construct these co-op programs to offer to students. These programs will be revolutionary, perhaps changing the standard of all college programs. One of the reasons I choose Seton Hall University is because they are highly ranked for getting their students internships in New York City. The purpose of college is to increase one’s education so they will be able to get a job in the future. Many colleges must adapt to the demands from the workforce to make graduates more attuned to real life application of the education they receive. This calls for an “overhaul of accreditation.” Stuart Butler, author of “Business Is Likely to Reshape Higher Education” says that, “accreditation has become a poor indicator of quality and increasingly a barrier to innovative and less costly forms of higher education. One big reason it stays in place, however, is that federal student aid is tied to accredited institutions.” Basically accreditation is setting the bar low for universities, allowing them to maintain their current education plan for students, instead of thinking of innovative ways for course delivery. Fortunately, it seems that Congress and other administrations are looking for alternative ways to break free from the traditional accreditation system. I look forward to seeing the transformation of higher education systems.

  6. Carl Hakansson January 19, 2017 at 7:50 pm #

    The purpose of college is to provide students with a higher education that is applicable to the real world. Families invest thousands upon thousands of dollars into schools, with the expectation that their son or daughter will be taught properly and efficiently. Despite this, only a reported 11% of business leaders think that college graduates are ready for the workforce. Considering that in the modern day college is considered a necessity to obtain a good job, it is startling that this huge investment barely reaps results. This can be blamed on multiple things – some may say that teachers “baby” their students, while others believe that universities just don’t put a big enough emphasis on certain material. From my own experience in college, I can attest to this to an extent. For most college freshman, schools require gen. ed. Courses to be completed over the course of the student’s first year or two. These courses can be beneficial to those who are undecided on their major, but for the rest of us they often feel like a waste of time. Here at Seton Hall, I have a declared major (business), and yet spent multiple hours a week over the course of my first semester studying for courses that had little to no relevance to business. With this in mind, if a student has a declared major, why not start preparing them early rather than requiring them to take general education courses?

    With the inauguration of a businessman as president, this can be seen as an exciting time of change for those studying business in college. According to the article, steps are being taken to resolve this issue. First off, colleges are working more closely with businesses. To me, this seems like a step that should have been taken long ago, as it is a win-win scenario. If businesses communicate with universities, they can ensure that potential job candidates will be ready to fill job openings when they come. Universities, on the other hand, will gain credibility and a reputation to prospective students, as they will possess a high percentage of former students that are now employed. Another step to ensure quality education that I agree with are guarantees. Guarantees, such as money-back guarantees, have been a component of business for years, as they provide the customer with the peace of mind that they are putting their money in the right place. By colleges providing guarantees such as “finishing in four years” or “earning a certain salary”, students will be able to confidently pick their college without worrying about where their money will go if they made the wrong choice. This will also improve the performance of the schools, as they will want to make sure their students are obtaining a quality education so they can keep their revenue.

    Despite the issues we are currently faced with regarding our education system, there are solutions. Ultimately, colleges want paying-students, students want jobs, and employers want employees that are prepared. To make this work properly and efficiently, schools need to focus on what’s important and stop “baby-ing” their students. By doing this, schools will gain a reputation for supplying their students with well-paying jobs. In effect, students will be well-prepared for the workforce, and employers will get employees that are capable of completing a job.

  7. Robert Seijas January 20, 2017 at 12:13 pm #

    It is incredibly shocking to hear the disagreeing thoughts between the colleges and businesses in regards to education, and the quality that is being imparted to students. With so many business leaders believing that the education of current students does not fully equip and prepare them for business, a reform should already be in the works. If the people hiring do not believe students are fully up to the task, that is a good sign that students are not fully up to the task. It does not help that the college administrators believe in the exact opposite. The disagreement is not helpful for anybody, as students may not get the proper education and businesses do not get the proper workers.
    It is said that business is going to shape the structure of higher education in the future. Although that may be true, it isn’t shocking to think that is already happening. With tuition prices going up and student loans going up, it seems that education is not for the students anymore. Even when a school labels itself as non-profit, it appears that everything they are doing is for the profit. Even though it may be a common misconception, the average opinion is that schools are now treating their activities like a business or corporation, being that they are trying to earn the highest profit possible. Ultimately, this is not a positive as it leads to dissatisfaction with students as well as distrust in the youth. People will not want to spend money on higher education and push themselves into debt if they believe that it will just empty their pockets.
    That being said, colleges may be able to shake this common belief if they improve their quality by working with businesses and pushing for a better culture, much like that article makes apparent. This is already being done with many businesses sponsoring not only college tuition, but their accreditation and even some courses and programs. Colleges working directly with businesses would be nothing but beneficial, because it would lead to a closer connection between the two and would bridge many gaps in belief and knowledge. It would better help prepare students, because they would create experiences in both work life and school life.
    One may suggest that with a successful businessperson becoming the president of the United States, the reforms necessary to make these changes to our higher education system could be well on the way. This would be the best way to receive a reform, being that it will be a nationwide effort that spans two industries, education and business. With proper guidance, this reform would be nothing but helpful, and could even help to fix the negative thoughts that many have about colleges. Mixing the world of education with the world of business is very close, just a few steps away, since it has already started at a few schools. All that is needed is a starting push, and the entire quality of education and the culture of schools could be changed for the benefit of students.

  8. Garrett Palmeri January 20, 2017 at 12:46 pm #

    Higher education and business are obviously two important aspects of my life as I attend Seton Hall and in the Stillman School of Business. When applying for my third higher education school as a transfer, I had to consider things that I had not in my previous application processes. Previous to my attendance at Seton Hall, my main focus was, “Where can I play baseball?” This was not the question when filling out my application for the Pirate Community. My decision was based on the ideas that Stuart M. Butler is talking about.
    The business workforce is becoming more competitive with each graduating class. It is shocking to see the difference of opinions about career ready graduates. Butler writes that, “Just 11 percent of business leaders believe college graduates are properly equipped for entering the workforce…” This is a complete failure of the higher education system. The purpose of a higher education, specifically in business, is to ready you for a career to live a purposeful and successful life. If higher education is failing to do so, what are they really doing besides taking our money? Butler seems to be optimistic about the future though. I agree that with the help of President-Elect Donald Trump, an international businessman, progress in this can be made. For the longest time, those who’ve held public office have had only political experience. An outsider such as Trump brings a whole new perspective to the White House and political agenda.
    In the article, Butler talks about how colleges are beginning to work closely with employers. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan is one of these tools that students can use. Starbucks designed a program for their employees to receive a quality education at a much lower cost. After further research into the program, I have learned that Starbucks is doing special things for its employees. Employees that work a minimum of twenty hours a week for three months become eligible for this program. All the eligible employees need to do is apply to Arizona State University, for free, and pass the admission process. Not only is financial aid is provided through specialists, but the students have access to tools such as a 24/7 tutor service. This is clearly a step in the right direction with help from private businesses. With active involvement from private industries, more people will be able to afford higher education and increase the demand for a more satisfying curriculum to real-world needs.
    I have mixed feelings about “money-back guarantees” for higher education though. The idea is phenomenal and could accomplish a lot within the necessary revamping of higher education. Using this idea, students are protected from universities that do not aid the student in graduating on time and finding a job. It is a common conception, one that I share personally, that many institutions will do anything to get a dollar, including holding you from graduating in several different ways. You see it at every school: the fees, holds on your account, and lack of involvement of faculty to their students. Using a money-back guarantee will force institutions to do everything in their power to assure you graduate on time and catapult into your chosen profession. This can hinder the system as well though. With this guarantee come many loopholes and ways for the institution to avoid this “guarantee.” Playing with the lives of students is easy when you can control several aspects of their life such as living situations and future schedules. It is not a full-proof plan but can do some good if applied correctly. It will be interesting to see if the plans Butler wrote about will be further implemented into society and also if the amount of workforce ready graduates increase with these programs.

  9. Matthew Radman January 20, 2017 at 3:55 pm #

    The motivations behind going to college have changed drastically between generations. Millenial and Generation X members are going to school more so to only “make more money” rather than “to gain a general education and appreciation of ideas,” says UC San Diego and San Diego State professors who conducted a poll amongst 8 million students. These results are understandable considering the differences in economies between when our parents went to college and now. Many students in college now or recently graduated felt the burden that the 2008 financial crisis weighed on them and their families. College was no longer about simply getting out of your parent’s house, being independent, and studying topics of interest for students. College is increasingly becoming an investment in a secure future. While education is an investment, it is important to not treat a college diploma as a static document. Many college students underestimate the importance of the work, experiences, and knowledge that go into the piece of paper received at the end. The diploma should not be all one strives for; the diploma should be a byproduct of the expertise gained through education.
    As college is seen more and more like a static and often necessary stepping stone in one’s life, the dynamic companies looking to hire students become increasingly dissatisfied with the preparation of students to join the workforce.
    Higher education needs to help refocus students towards educating students while partnering with businesses to better understand the real needs of employers. If colleges can forge better ties with the economy in which it sends its graduates, students can be more confident in their ability to find work after graduation. This approach also helps relieve the pressure of the unknown job market felt by students and allows them to focus on educating themselves to have the best footing when they step into the real world after graduation.
    Another step towards reshaping education for the modern economy is for colleges to act more like the firms they are at their core and provide guarantees to students who are investing significant time and money to attend. Schools like SUNY Buffalo have recently announced “Finish in 4” programs that guarantee on-time graduation. The Brookings Institution makes an interesting remark when it mentions that colleges traditionally implement a “buyer beware” philosophy. It becomes hard to understand why universities, being investments, rest so much risk on the purchasers. The United States government implemented regulatory agencies and statutes such as the Uniform Commercial Code to protect against caveat emptor situations between business and consumers. Why aren’t colleges held to similarly high standards?
    Higher education currently stands as the gateway between adolescence and adulthood for most people, professionally. However, the current higher education system is not training students adequately to become the professionals that the private sector is looking for. Colleges can no longer sit idle as the world changes around it, just as students cannot accept an ‘assembly-line’ mindset when it comes to the education that they invest in. To help tighten this expectation gap schools must understand their role as investments and prioritize higher return on investment for customers, companies must communicate their needs and help colleges develop their programs, and students must regain their earned purchasing power over their education and ultimately their future.

  10. Guy Barbano January 20, 2017 at 4:22 pm #

    In today’s time higher education is seen as a very important idea to get a step up in the world. In my parents time college educations weren’t really needed you could get one but didn’t really need to and for my grandparents they were lucky to get a high school degree. In those days degrees weren’t needed to work labor jobs or really any blue collar job and some white collar work. Now though almost all jobs require some sort of degree whether a college or tech school degree for the line of work you are in. With more and more jobs requiring higher education many and almost everyone goes to college now to get one. We believe just having a degree instantly will increase our yearly salary or check. Which is not the case at all. Just because we sat through a class for 4 or 5 years does not make us qualified to work jobs. Some of us just do not actually know what they are supposed to do in certain situations. As the article talks about, colleges believe they are allowing graduates into the work forced qualified for the jobs they pursue when many employers believe they are not as the article says, “just 11 percent of business leaders believe college graduates are properly equipped for entering the workforce” which when looking at it from the perspective of every college in the U.S. that is a lot of students that are just not qualified to be in the workforce. The article brings up a point that more colleges are and will be working with employers to make sure they are ready to go out and work. As soon as we graduate college we should be seen as qualified and ready to go out and work. Employers should not have to question the ability of a new employee on their ability to perform a task. With colleges working closer with employers I feel as if this will help us as college students, the work force and economy. Another huge topic that came up in the article is something called a money back guarantee. Which I see as a very promising idea for us college students. Since many of us pick our majors around job security and the salary of the job. With a money back guarantee from the university I feel as if it will really help college students not have to worry about salaries coming out of college and the 6 months after when we have to start paying back loans if we have any to pay. It also talks about a how some colleges are trying the guarantee idea around saying how long it will or should take to graduate which is also a key item since not many students want to spend extra semesters they do not need at college. Which ties up our ability to earn money, when we could have graduated earlier but are instead at school an extra year or semester that’s 4 to 8 months a student could have been making money and not be in the classroom. With this I feel as if with the new president Donald Trump in office with a large business background. I feel it will really help the higher education system and its students.

  11. Nicholas Thomas January 20, 2017 at 6:12 pm #

    College was never meant to turnout workers, it was meant to be a status symbol and create a “gentleman.” People attended higher education because they were expected to, not because they believed it could change their social class or offer a “better” life. Part of the reason for the existing issues with higher education today, is that the use of college has changed while the actual format of it has not. As of today, the assumption is that college offers more opportunities and a better life, which can be true, but was never the intentions of college. So after reading the article, I was not surprised at the difference between how business leaders view the work readability of college graduates versus how higher education officers view the preparedness to work of college graduates. Students throw vast amounts of money at college under the impression they will get a well-paying job and comfortable life, but do not ever receive the skills to accomplish such goals. Knowing that business leaders are taking an interest in adjusting the format of the education higher education system, gives me hope that the format and use of college will be the same. As stated in the article, actions such as higher education establishments working closely with employers, reforming accreditation, and improving the guarantees offered by colleges could help prepare graduates for the work force. By universities working with employers, students can learn the exact skills their career requires. Moreover, students can begin to form connections within the field they are pursuing. Skills are imperative for obtaining a job but networking is just as important. Networking allows students to become accustom to the demands of the career they are interested in. Businesses also have the opportunity to improve upon accreditations of colleges. The article points out that accreditation makes creating less costly learning platforms difficult. Also, an accreditation certifies the entire college not the specific programs. By businesses associating themselves with certain programs, students would learn what programs at particular colleges are creditable. However, businesses cannot do all the work with correcting the higher education system. I would argue that colleges should lessen the number of required course types that have nothing to do with the majors students are pursuing. If students are going to develop skills, it would make sense not to distract them from developing skills relative to their choice in career. This brings me to the ridiculous difference of the view of how prepared graduates are for the workforce. If only 11% of business leaders believe graduates are work-ready while, 98% of higher education officials believe graduates are work ready, why not have professors attend workshops where they learn the demands of certain careers? The workshops would not only improve the professors’ understanding of necessary skills, but the workshops also remove the “sage on the stage” issue by forcing professors the adapt to expectations of the real world.
    Due to the entire education system, students have learned how to take tests. Moreover, students are masters of “winging it” because many have not been challenged to actually demonstrate a set of skills. If the goal of higher education is to prepare students for higher skilled jobs than students should work closely with businesses they want to work in.

  12. Andrew Imbesi January 20, 2017 at 7:11 pm #

    Without a college education, I feel as if my life cannot progress further. I am attending Seton Hall University with a primary goal of completing my degree in order to reach a well-paying job. This is something that is easier said than done. Completing college with a degree and finding a well-paying job is difficult. The competitiveness amongst students has risen dramatically over the past few decades. Although this competitiveness pushes college students to work harder than the other, employers are having an even harder time finding college graduates that can execute correctly in the workforce. This creates a major problem because there are hundreds of thousands of college students paying tuition for degrees that barely prepare them for their future jobs. This problem has brought employers closer together with colleges, making higher education more valuable than it was before.
    One of the many benefits of attending Seton Hall University is that Seton Hall offers one of the best internship programs in the nation. Likewise, other colleges and universities are beginning to improve their relationships with employers. Aside from internship programs, colleges and employers have been working together to establish partnerships such as the Starbucks College Achievement Plan. These partnerships are providing college students with more feasible material towards their future occupations, and less debt to pay off in the future with discounted tuition. By combining business and education, diverse education paths will continue to rise as education quality becomes better. However, difficulty in paying tuition prices will persist. Fortunately, students trying to save money will benefit from the partnerships and scholarships offered between businesses and higher education schools.
    By addressing the divide between business and education, employers and administrators will be able to contribute more to a college student’s overall success. While eleven percent of business leaders find college graduates properly prepared to work in the workplace, 96 percent of chief academic officers find their college graduates ready to pursue suitable occupations. If only eleven percent of business leaders find college students well prepared to work, there must be a problem with the education system. Typically, critics claim that the education system is failing for teaching students unnecessary material. However, the lack of course material is what prevents a college student from being well prepared to enter the workforce. I believe chief academic officers have little room to talk; chief academic officers hold only one occupation compared to the thousands nationwide. I do not explain to the doctor how to repair a torn ligament. Likewise, what does a chief academic officer know about working in a hospital if he or she has worked in education for all his or her life? A chief academic officer does not know if the student will be a successful doctor. Chief academic officers can only assume a student will be successful by their grades. If business leaders are saying that these students are underprepared, they are more right than a chief academic officer is. Hopefully with the growing relations between education and business, administrators and employers will be on the same page.

  13. Derek Luckman January 20, 2017 at 7:36 pm #

    In reading this article I must say that I do agree somewhat in the fact that college does not quite prepare students for the intensity of the business world. In my opinion, college only provides employers with the knowledge that an individual knows how to retain information, and can do what is asked of him or her. The business world requires much more than just such qualities as one will soon learn that you have to be somewhat unorthodox and trusting of yourself in order to “make things work”. I must say I am somewhat surprised in the discrepancy between 96% of academic officers who believe college students are ready for the workplace and the modest 11 percent of business employers who share the same belief. But once again I must agree with the employers. What is my reasoning for this? Well if you look at the requirements of let’s say a Stillman business school student, you will see only a portion of the required course is directly related to his or her major. So because we took a few courses for a couple of weeks in finance, we are all of a sudden ready to be financial advisers? I would say not. In fact, most of the learning graduates are doing in their field is coming from the hands on experience in working with a business, which is why internships have become such an intricate part in landing the job that students are looking for. What internships actually do is put you in your field and allow you to see and take part in the day to day working. But wait, I thought that was what college is for right? I mean what is the point in shelling out tens of thousands in dollars in tuition only to be told that you still havens gained the tools necessary for the workplace. So how will this change? Well I think one very important point that the article touched on and that colleges have gotten into is working more closely with business employers. This one great strategy to get students more closely relates to their field. I would say the most useful program would be the money back guarantee. As previously discussed, we know college students are dishing out a lot of money to obtain these degrees so what this does is somewhat minimize the risk that students are taking in investing in themselves. Far too many times we hear the story of a college graduate with maybe even multiple degrees, not being to find a good job and stuck in a mediocre trend because simply that’s what available to them. So the ideas presented in this article to make college more of a rewarding experience instead of a terrifying investment have won me over at this point. You see, in the world we live in today, college degrees are more common than ever. With college being more common than ever questions start to rise, one of the most perplexing being, is it actually worth it? Is it actually worth the money just for 89% of business employers to tell you that you are not ready yet? Another question would be, how do we have so many well-known millionaires and billionaires who have not finished college? These are some of the things that should be addressed in hopefully making college once again a safe step towards the American dream.

  14. Benjamin Jaros January 20, 2017 at 8:26 pm #

    It seems to me, as a student, that higher education is in need of a radical shake-up and, unlike the article the tone of this article, I have felt this way for years. From my perspective, as a student, too many kids are in college. Many students should not be here. College is not for everyone. Not everyone fits into the white-collar, desk job mold. Further, too many students leave with degrees that can hardly justify the economic cost of going to a University.
    However, as the article discussed, many colleges have a Caveat Emptor philosophy when it comes to providing students with marketable degrees. One of the most important things a student should be required to do before entering college is to ensure that they will be leaving in both a timely fashion and with a profitable degree. From my perspective, anything greater than four years for most undergraduate degrees is untimely and a profitable degree is anything that justifies the cost of going to college in the first place.
    Beyond the “Buyer beware” troubles, then students are confronted with the reality that only 11% of business leaders think that a college degree prepares them for the workforce. Further, 96% of chief administrators think otherwise? I hardly think so. Rather, I think school administrators and educators feel obligated to keep up the façade that they are preparing students for the workforce in order to maintain money flowing their way. I mean, imagine if a professor at this school came out publicly and said, “Seton Hall does not prepare students for the workforce.” He would be released immediately.
    Next, it seems as though the article is advocating for the abolishment of accreditation when it says, “in practice it has become a poor indicator of quality and increasingly a barrier to innovative and less costly forms of higher education. One big reason it stays in place, however, is that federal student aid is tied to accredited institutions.”
    However, I am not certain that the abolishment of accreditation goes far enough, but I think it touched on another important issue plaguing higher education: federal student aid. Could a means for getting rid of accreditation come from getting rid of Federal Student aid?
    The purpose of federal student aid is to help those on the bottom rungs of society receive a higher education. However, if only 9% of young adults of the people from the lowest 25% are receiving degrees, maybe it is time to not look as a lack of federal aid as the problem, rather as a cause of the financial problems in higher education.

    Federal student aid guarantees educators more students and they are guaranteed money. Why would educators provide a service that students or society actually needs when they are going to be paid anyways?
    As a student, I see many ungrateful students who go to school to party, not learn. Many students who do not realize that an education is privilege, not a right. Simultaneously, I see the hard work and determination of those scrubbing the floors and those working in the cafeteria. It is a land of two worlds. This is not a problem at just this university; it plagues nearly every university in the country. However, politicians and educators have tried to make education for everyone and have ruined higher education in the process.
    In order for universities to be restored to their former height as institutions preparing students for the workforce, the students will need to become more serious about learning, educators will need to get more serious about educating for a modern economy, and the government might try to get more serious about leaving higher education alone.

  15. Juan Landin January 20, 2017 at 8:42 pm #

    I believe that businesses will greatly improve how ready college graduates are for the real world. Being in college at the moment this is very refreshing. Although I find it odd that according to the article, only 11% of business leaders feel students are properly equipped for the workforce while 96% of colleges chief academic officers feel they produce work ready students.
    This clearly means there is some miscommunication here. I find this absurd because this is one of the main reasons people go to college, to learn the skills appropriate to enter the workforce and make money. If colleges are not preparing kids for the jobs they want in the future then what are they doing? This is a serious problem and needs to be addressed immediately. Academic officers at colleges shouldn’t think they are doing their job when only 11% of graduates are deemed ready for the workforce. They should be revamping their curriculum or hiring more experienced professors who teach about the workplace they have worked in. This would help students by being taught what the workforce is looking for and how to learn it.
    According to the article, businesses also wish to change the accreditation that colleges receive. Many colleges are accredited but don’t really prepare students for the real world. Businesses want to change the criteria that colleges have to meet in order to be accredited. They want to based college credentials based on how well the college prepares the students for the workforce. This would motivate colleges to change their programs to get students more workforce ready in order to receive the accreditation which attracts more students and increases the reputation of the school.
    The article also says that colleges are working more closely with colleges to make sure that the schools are making the students ready for the workplace. Why this wasn’t done more before I don’t know. If you are educating students on entering the workforce, shouldn’t you pair with the companies they will be trying to work for? This will also help students who don’t really know what they want to be. If they hear from a person who has been or is currently in the workforce of that particular field, then they can tell them what to expect out of a career like that. Then the student will figure out if that is the career they want to pursue or if they might want to change paths.
    Finally, the article details plans some colleges have implemented certain guarantees such as students will graduate in a certain amount of time, will find a job with a certain income, etc. If the school doesn’t meet these guarantees then they will not charge you for attending. This would be a huge change if implemented at many more schools. Students would be less hesitant to attend college if these guarantees are implemented, leading to more students attending college. If you attend college and graduate but are not getting hired anywhere because you are not properly prepared for that job field then it is the fault of the college because that is why you are paying so much money; to be prepared so that you can land a job in the field you are studying.
    These changes that are just starting to gain momentum are long overdue. If more than half of college graduates weren’t deemed ready to enter the workforce then what were these colleges doing then? If that is basically their main purpose then they have been robbing people this whole time. Businesses need to teach colleges what they are looking for so that the colleges can pass that knowledge onto the students so that they can work for those businesses.

  16. Nicolas F Carchio January 20, 2017 at 8:56 pm #

    The current college or higher education model places the responsibility for learning on the student’s ability memorize, not utilize, information from courses. This demands students to ‘learn’ from hearing, vigorous note taking, and is then followed by memorization. the result of this is the regurgitation of the information onto tests. Through this process, students are tested on the information that their teachers believe is relevant to the class and the business sector, but the problem lies in life after the tests. Many students find themselves forced to memorize, and not able apply information in order to survive a multitude of rigorous classes one must take to graduate. Being successful through college does not correlate with advancing through the unforgiving business world. In the modern day, receiving a college degree equates to a middle-class type lifestyle, and therefore higher education aims to ensure their students this. The institutes of higher education, such as universities and colleges, must reassess their forms of education in order to better prepare their students for reaching higher standards success and becoming a knowledgeable resource in the workplace.

    As the current system stands, many employers do not believe that college or university students are not truly prepared for the workplace, which leads to low rates of college graduate employment. A recent study shows that “just 11 percent of business leaders believe college graduates are properly equipped for entering the workforce” conversely to the “96 percent of college’s chief academic officers [who] feel they turn out work-ready graduates” (Butler). These claims demonstrate the vast split between the business world and academics. The goal of higher education should be to prepare students for the ever-changing workplace by giving them the real-world experience and applicable. While the educational administrators believe, their philosophy creates graduates that are ready for the business world, the employers are emphasizing that they are not in favor of the current system. Due to the fact that employer’s voices are not being heard by the educational system, they take matters into their own hands and do not favor employing recent graduates. I believe employers are looking for a system focused on true learning, encompassing thought provoking subjects that teach the ability to understand complex topics and allow students improve on mistakes they have made. Through these educational improvements, higher education can help students gain the skills that they need in order to adapt and function properly in the business environment.

    Money has an influence on the educational system, it effects how different universities allocate their funds to students, as well as the level of financial aid that certain universities the students can receive. Money affects higher education, as it is a driving force for many students to choose universities in which they can afford, and thus the level of their education will be determined by their degree. The fact that college tuition costs are extremely high, leads to students incurring large amounts of debt. This debt coupled with the fact that they cannot find a job after graduation becomes problematic for young people to function in society. Businesses offer internships and co-ops in an attempt to train students for the corporate world. Real world success is created by businesses developing students by working closer with them. Through this business can give students the information they need that is relevant to their career, not the waste less memorization that is seen in the educational model. Essentially, when businesses are more inclined to intervene in the college setting, they can better shape graduates for the business world. By working together, the value of a college degree would thus increase, and students would be truly learning in order to better perform in the workplace.

    The improvements in education will allow students to thrive, as they will be truly learning valuable, real-world information that can help them in their working lives. Through these educational advances, graduates will be able to join the workplace, pay off their college loans, and become active and productive members of society. The influence of business on the system of higher education will make for a more well-rounded and prepared student for the corporate world.

  17. Zion McMillan January 20, 2017 at 8:58 pm #

    Being an undergraduate Business Management major, this article caught my attention immediately. It is no secret that college is a business, and families across the country are shelling out hundreds of thousands of dollars in the hopes that a college degree guarantees the security of their child’s future. In this article the author touched upon a very big issue, which is that collegiate administrators believe they are doing enough to prepare their undergrads, when in reality the corporate world is chewing them up. The even larger issue is that there is now a kid who invested large sums of money and put themselves in debt because they were promised a job. Where is the discrepancy?
    Ever since kindergarten, schools implement such cookiecutter style of learning with no evidence to prove they are successful. It’s as if administrators are too proud to give up their unsupported styles of learning, just because they created them. I think it is insanely important for universities to pay attention and apply what the real world is telling them- They must better prepare their students.
    As a student of business this scares me. I am paying so much money to attend a good university, and am faced with the harsh reality that aside from my hard work towards getting my diploma, I don’t know enough and am unfit to do work. If that is the case, then why shell out so much money, time, effort, and dedication to something that will just end up being a waste of time. From a generational standpoint, it feels as if we are all being setup to fail.
    Regardless, a change needs to be made. I think it should be on the shoulders of both the older and younger generations to fix this. The old thinking of the administration should be expelled and more open to new ideas. Additionally, the younger folk should understand what is actually expected of them. There is no excuse as to why there is such a big gap.
    In a society that is built so much around a working class,this is just an absurd situation. The education system is evidently broken when students are in crippling debt before they even see their 21st birthday. But if they do not attend college their future is just slightly less bleak.
    I also think a lot of pressure should be put on the federal government to probe misspending and put more money into education. If the K-12 education improves on all levels, a big part of this issue would be resolved because it starts from the bottom.
    Finally, it is up to the everyday citizen who is paying all of this money to hold people accountable. Colleges are getting away with this type of scam because no one is watching them.

  18. Cameron Collier January 20, 2017 at 9:27 pm #

    America’s business influence shows potential college policies are on the rise. The president of the United States will have a great opportunity to make businesses reshape higher education in the entire country. As stated in the article, going to college in modern society can be quite risky. Students can waste countless years in school when they can be using that time to be making money. The fact that there are issues with our current education system is obvious. Students subject themselves to large amounts of debt in order to get degrees in majors that they find interesting themselves but after graduating; realize that current employers do not.
    When colleges are so expensive to attend, this could potentially be a major mistake because if the student cannot earn a job, they could go into very serious debt without any means to pay. Colleges are responsible for preparing you for your future career but they are not the only ones. Students rely too heavily on the aid of other people, professors and counselors and because of this, are not able to prepare themselves for their futures. Colleges are working with employers to see exactly what they expect from new employees.By addressing the divide between business and education, employers and administrators will be able to contribute more to a college student’s overall success. Part of the reason for the existing issues with higher education today, is that the use of college has changed while the actual format of it has not.
    College was no longer about simply getting out of your parent’s house, being independent, and studying topics of interest for students. College is increasingly becoming an investment in a secure future. Federal student aid guarantees educators more students and they are guaranteed money. Why would educators provide a service that students or society actually needs when they are going to be paid anyways?According to the article, businesses also wish to change the accreditation that colleges receive. Many colleges are accredited but don’t really prepare students for the real world.
    Finally, the article details plans some colleges have implemented certain guarantees such as students will graduate in a certain amount of time, will find a job with a certain income, etc. If the school doesn’t meet these guarantees then they will not charge you for attending. This would be a huge change if implemented at many more schools. Students would be less hesitant to attend college if these guarantees are implemented, leading to more students attending college. If you attend college and graduate but are not getting hired anywhere because you are not properly prepared for that job field then it is the fault of the college because that is why you are paying so much money; to be prepared so that you can land a job in the field you are studying. These changes that are just starting to gain momentum are long overdue. If more than half of college graduates weren’t deemed ready to enter the workforce then what were these colleges doing then? If that is basically their main purpose then they have been robbing people this whole time.

  19. Cameron Collier January 26, 2017 at 3:07 pm #

    This article by Stuart Butler really caught my attention for many reasons. Students go to college for one main purpose, and that is to get a high paying job once they graduate. The fact that there are issues with our current education system is obvious. Students subject themselves to large amounts of debt in order to get degrees in majors that they find interesting themselves but after graduating; realize that current employers do not. It is not only the fault of the labor system that after graduating, 9% of young people from the lowest income quartile will have learned skills that will not be useful in the workforce but also the fault of the individual. Students that go to college just to get by with a passing grade can be setting themselves up for failure. Being content with just passing means not doing all the assigned work or not fully paying attention in class.
    Colleges are responsible for preparing you for your future career but they are not the only ones. Students rely too heavily on the aid of other people, professors and counselors and because of this, are not able to prepare themselves for their futures. People want a guarantee that they will be getting their money’s worth for the education they receive. Many colleges claim that they prepare students for the workforce, but when business leaders are asked about the performance of college graduates “only 11% believe college graduates for properly equipped to enter the workforce.” College is increasingly becoming an investment in a secure future. While education is an investment, it is important to not treat a college diploma as a static document.
    According to the article, businesses also wish to change the accreditation that colleges receive. Many colleges are accredited but don’t really prepare students for the real world. Businesses want to change the criteria that colleges have to meet in order to be accredited. The current college or higher education model places the responsibility for learning on the student’s ability memorize, not utilize, information from courses. This demands students to ‘learn’ from hearing, vigorous note taking, and is then followed by memorization. the result of this is the regurgitation of the information onto tests. Regardless, a change needs to be made. I think it should be on the shoulders of both the older and younger generations to fix this. The old thinking of the administration should be expelled and more open to new ideas. The education system is evidently broken when students are in crippling debt before they even see their 21st birthday. But if they do not attend college their future is just slightly less bleak. I also think a lot of pressure should be put on the federal government to probe misspending and put more money into education. If the K-12 education improves on all levels, a big part of this issue would be resolved because it starts from the bottom. Finally, it is up to the everyday citizen who is paying all of this money to hold people accountable. Colleges are getting away with this type of scam because no one is watching them.

  20. Erin Carunchio January 27, 2017 at 10:57 am #

    In today’s world, going to college and getting a degree is the answer to getting a well-paid job. Growing up, I was told I was going to go to college. I had no choice. Both my parents did not complete college, even though they are now finically stable and successful, it took them years to find stability. They do not want me to go through the same struggles that they experienced. Graduating from College is the start to stability. Today, having a degree means bigger salary. However, earning a degree does not necessarily mean that you are proficient in that job or field. I was not surprised to read that most college graduates are not as proficient at their skills in their field of choice. Students now are not focused on the material they are learning, they are focused on just passing. It is based on the professor too. Some professors are harder than others. Some may take the material seriously and will add no curve and give the student the grade they actually deserve. Some other professors curve a lot so they do not have to see that student retake their class the following semester.
    Today, School to most students is just about passing. It is about getting the letter grade to move onto the next level. Students do not focus on the material taught. Once the test or exam is over, they forget most of it. Not all students are like this, but some are. I am not sure if the work is getting harder or students are just getting lazier. It is probably a combination of both. A lot of work is assigned and grades are such a high demand that students do the bare minimum. They settle for the lowest grade possible to still pass. The key word is settle. Students do a lot of settling in college I am seeing. When students settle, they fail to try to do their absolute best. They do not try to know and master the material, I only know it enough to past the test. That is a big problem in today’s workforce. Employees are forgetting how to do certain task to because they simply forget what they learned in school. The material is remembered for a short period of time and then forgotten soon after. If it most likely not remember until a time needed, and at that time it may be too late. It’s the simply things that students do not remember. The things that they think they will never need to know again. However, when those simple skills come again and they do not remember it, it will not look good to their employer. Employers today are looking for people more reliable when it comes to being proficient and knowing the job.
    Overall I was not surprised that employees these days are not proficient as they should be in their field. Students go to school in a hope of passing. At the end, if you just pass all your classes and receive all your credits, you will receive your degree. Also, a lot of your peers may have the same degree as you. Everyone will have the same diploma. Employers need to start being careful who they hire and to start hiring people who are actually proficient in their field. Students need to start focusing on the material being taught and being able to master it, rather just worrying about passing.

  21. John Phillips January 27, 2017 at 3:13 pm #

    A major change needed in modern society is a shakeup of the whole college education system. Students are coming out with massive debt, high expectations, but yet cannot find a job. This tragedy places a burden on most middle and low income Americans. One of the major reasons graduates struggle to find jobs is lack of practical real world skills. Instead, they can recite lines from a book, or speak about theory for hours, but fail to display the necessary skills to have success in business. Some of these skills include: technology, writing, presenting, and engaging in substantive conversation. These are all essential components to being successful in the corporate world and making a sustainable living.
    It is great to hear that businesses are impacting reform of the college system. Instead of making it free, and devaluing the degree, businesses are working to improve the value of the degree. They are trying to change curriculum so that it has more practicality and purpose in the real world. The goal is to teach students how to solve problems, and properly develop the necessary skills. Writing, with the purpose of communicating with executives and coworkers is an essential skill. Employers find that this important skill is deficient in graduates. This is one skill now being emphasized in colleges around the country. You must be able to effectively communicate with coworkers and higher ups in order to have chemistry, and success in business. Technological skills are also lacking in graduates, which is why colleges are now emphasizing that no matter what degree you are pursuing, that you develop sufficient technological skills. In a digital age, businesses run on technology, and graduates lacking in these skills provide no value to these companies, leading to unemployment and struggles finding a job. This places an emphasis on the idea that we need to diversify our skill set, in order to be successful. Companies are gearing their hiring process towards those who have the widest range of skills, effectively bringing the most value to their company. The next skill graduates must focus on are presentation and public speaking skills; these are essential for being able to climb the corporate ladder. Those who can effectively speak and present will be given tasks of great importance. These skills will allow employers to trust these graduates with more things, boosting their value. I believe, as a college student that diversifying my skill set and building a network are the two most important aspects of finding a job, post-graduation.
    The accreditation process most definitely needs to be fixed. The idea that businesses will be working closely with government to improve curriculum quality will greatly boost the value of a degree. Programs such as co-ops and direct business contact with universities will help students learn skills necessary to be hired. Making college more affordable by introducing the money back guarantee is very interesting. This will eliminate students from amassing major debt to obtain a worthless degree. This concept would eliminate unnecessary classes and studying, crucial for learning what’s actually important. This eliminates the notion that college is buyer beware, a scary idea, considering college is not a product, but a means of obtaining an education. We as a society must do two things; find ways to make college more affordable by eliminating unnecessary things, and boosting the value of a degree. This will be achieved by allowing businesses to influence what students learn, helping societies overall educational development. These two goals would eliminate debt from so many students and provide them only with skills they can actually use. There is nothing more important than accomplishing these two goals.

  22. Frankie Lisa January 27, 2017 at 3:37 pm #

    Attaining a successful and stable career in America today is very difficult without earning college degree. However, earning a college degree does not guarantee the graduate will receive a job. Many of those graduates who are fortunate enough to receive a job will not leave college with the skills necessary to enter the workforce.
    In a survey taken among college’s chief academic officers, 96% of them believe their students have the skills necessary to enter the workforce. However, only 11% of employers believe the recent college graduates they hire are ready to enter the workforce. This huge discrepancy indicates a major problem is present in the way college students are educated. I strongly agree with the employers in this debate; recent graduates are simply not ready for the real world. I have attended college as an accounting for a full semester, and I have learned very information in class would help me in the business world. There is some useful information I have learned in class, however, I could have saved my money and just taken out a book from the library instead.
    The article identifies some trends or ideas that will try to increase the percentage of graduates who are ready for the workforce. The first idea is for colleges to work more closely with employers. Colleges partnering with local employers allows both parties to be on the same page in teaching the students what they need to know for the real world. This proposal also allows the students to exit college with more marketable skills. It also allows the students to establish relationships with future employers which will set up future employment opportunities. Another proposal is a shake-up in accreditation programs. The purpose of accreditations is to guarantee students receive a quality education. However, it has become more of a barrier to more innovative forms of education. Many employers believe these accreditation programs fail to teach students what they need to know. I think both of these proposals would do an excellent job of making students more prepared for the workforce.
    Another proposal the article offers is “money-back guarantees.” Almost every college uses a buyer beware business model; if you are unsatisfied with the results of your education then you wasted your money. More colleges now are starting to offer more guarantees, such as guaranteeing you will finish in four years, or the college will swallow the cost of additional semesters. Some colleges even guarantee employment with a certain income. Both of these types of programs are in early stages of development. I think these two proposals are too idealistic and problematic. I think both ideas would produce less motivated students; almost every college student will not put in as much effort if you guarantee something to him or her. I also think it is unrealistic to make a promise such as guaranteed employment; this may leave the college vulnerable to lawsuits and damaged reputations.

  23. Evan Costello January 27, 2017 at 4:08 pm #

    As of late, light has been shed on the premise of a higher education as to whether or not it is necessary given the accomplishments one can make without a college degree as well as how expensive a college education is. This issue is a case by case basis, but by and large, a college is absolutely essential now more than ever. Some argue that even a college degree is not enough to rise above competitors for employment. The time we live in is arguably the most competitive job market in this country’s history. The job market is becoming smaller, which the demand for work has increased along with what employers expect of their employees. However, I believe colleges and universities have made attempts to give their students and donators more of a bang for their buck. For example, according to this article, colleges do more for their students to try and find them sources of employment. The career center here at Seton Hall University still has connections to alumni that find employment and internships via this service. This service in particular works tirelessly to give students the opportunity to find some source of employment after they receive a degree.
    Secondly, this article also references accreditation for colleges and universities. As stated previously, there has been some consideration concerning the comparison of the benefits versus the cost of a higher education. Accreditation assures that side of the paradox and gives the party paying for the education the guarantee of a quality education. According to this article, there has been an increasing demand for academic accreditation to be remastered towards workforce needs. For example, federal student aid shall be granted to those who enroll in postsecondary courses.
    Lastly, according to this article, there have also been pushes for money-back guarantees. Thousands upon thousands of students attend a university with a career in mind for the future, but realize after further study in that area of expertise that they despise that field and want nothing to do with it. For example, prior to enrolling here at Seton Hall University, I had an interest in communication. Now, I am enrolled as a Stillman business student with a focus in finance and economics with no desire to study communication at all. For those who attend a university or college who undergo this sense of self-realization, by the time they decide to pursue their dream, it is far too late. The recent push for a money-back guarantee is that if a student does not finish their education in four years, the university will cover some of the costs of the education itself. As a college student, this premise would be nothing but beneficial to the average student who has no idea what line of work they would like to follow. I am glad that business have shed some light on the fact that a college degree, although they may be more common than in years past, still carry weight. In my opinion, each student at least deserves a chance at employment if they do well enough to prove themselves after receiving a high education.

  24. Filip Bizek February 6, 2017 at 10:51 pm #

    It is scary how quickly our social norms are changing. From the stories told by my parents and others, going to a university was never a necessity. The economy was growing and it almost seemed like there was no time or need to go passed the high-school benchmark. I remember reading Wolf of Wall Street, and I felt astonished that Jordan Belfort did no hire people based on their education. After all, he himself majored in Biology, which was totally opposite from what he end up doing. Jordan did not care if you finished Harvard or not. In his eyes, potential was much more valuable in comparison to a piece of paper stating that you completed bunch of classes irrelevant to this work demand. However, the times have changed and so did the competition. Bachelor’s Degree became the new high-school diploma. As stated in the article, college is crucial to making it into the middle class in America.

    There is an issue on the rise involving Universities’ inability to prepare its students for the jobs of the future. The article states, “11% of business leaders believe college graduates are properly equipped for entering the workforce.” If this number is accurate, this is simply horrific from the point of view of a student. We are paying so much money for something that simply does not deliver. Perhaps my opinion is false; nonetheless, so far I have learned that the primary benefit of attending a university is the formation of a network. In other words, establishment of prosperous connections outweighs the primary benefit of a university which supposed to be education. Therefore, it is time for the universities to reinvent their curriculum and combine schoolwork with actual jobs. Just to clarify my position on this issue, it is very important for students to learn different areas of studies but this cannot be the only agenda set by the administration. For example, on too many occasions professors are themselves out of date with the reality and transfer their mindset onto students. That is why I view Prof. Shannon so highly; he is actually connecting our class to the modern times through enforcement of technology and connection to the present times.

    The proposal of universities combining its forces with actual businesses sounds like a traffic idea. It would be so beneficial for the students if school’s agenda would take under consideration what skills are valuable for the employers. We need to find a way to appease all three members involved in this conversation. Business wants people to be ready on day one, student wants a high paying job, and university wants to expand its participant’s views. This relationship is highly dependent on one another and has to be strongly emphasized.

    In my opinion, the last part of the article does not make much sense. On what authority would university be able to secure a certain income level for a student? In the utopian society, every one of us would do what they love and get a high reward for it. Unfortunately, we get to live in the real world and the reality is significantly different from utopia. Only the small percentage of people get to do what they really enjoy. Most of the middle class people do not have time and money to search for their ideal workforce. People like us have to make calculated decisions and choose careers that are in demand if one would like to succeed. In my life, there is no more room for error when it comes to this issue.

  25. George Tannous March 24, 2017 at 3:29 pm #

    It is insane how the job market has changed in the matter of years. High school degrees were once considered a career opener to long term jobs. If one wanted to live comfortably, a high school degree was all that was required. Nowadays, high school degrees are beyond what is expected. Now college degrees are also expected if one wants a long term job opportunity. And in a lot of cases, not all college degrees produce job opportunities. The high majority of jobs are given to graduates in STEM. If one does not have any experience in STEM studies, the chances of landing a sufficient long term job is very low. This is because technology plays a pivotal part of how our world works. It is already to the point where if you do not major in a STEM subject you will almost automatically be granted a large amount of uncertainty along with your degree.
    The only way to get around not taking STEM studies is to distinguish yourself from everyone else. Distinguishing yourself is also not easy, it requires creativity. You need to be different than everybody else in a way that will benefit the employer. The reality is STEM studies are subjects as close to what the work force is looking for. Otherwise, those who deviate need to compensate by at least learning basics in programming and computer literacy. The job market is constantly changing now, almost every year new dynamics are added. The great recession of 2007 essentially changed the norms of society, I believe that if that recession never occurred we would have a sustainable market. There would be no stop to technology’s rise in our world, but it would have been eased in. Jobs would not require people right out of college to know such vital skills but would have rather been taught them on job. This is because employers are hiring less and hiring only those who have practical skills.
    Colleges prepare one with a set of knowledge and skills, which have not changed as the market and world has. The world is already surrounded by technology and this is just going to keep growing as each year passes. This essentially makes students unprepared for the reality of the work force and job market today. Students spend 4 years and thousands of dollars in debt and college loans only to not have a job or work coming right out of school and possibly months and even years after graduating. The reality of it is if you are not looking to work a high profile job, college is worthless. One would be better off going straight into a technical school or taking online classes to learn real world skills than to spend over $100k in college for an education that brings no opportunities. It is a waste of time and money, students are being cheated. The only real life benefit that comes with colleges are as the article pointed out, businesses that work with the schools. This could give students who graduate an edge over other students from other colleges looking for the same job. Career center and career events are also great at offering opportunities such as internships.

  26. Joshua Luchon March 24, 2017 at 6:41 pm #

    While I enjoyed this article for the most part, I found the last bit about a “money back guarantee” infuriating. I am all for maximizing utility and decreasing the burden of student loans, but a money back guarantee is not the way to do it. Student loan debt is a scary subject for most college students, but that should not necessitate a “money back guarantee.” Despite parameters put in place for programs that offer some form of a refund if a student cant find a job or doesn’t make enough money, teaching the new generation of employees that they can expect to be taken care of should things not work out in their favor is pure insanity. The only certainties in life are death and taxes. Beyond that, desired outcomes require hard work, often times lots of it. College should be approached the same way. College should be viewed as a learning experience and a tool for future success. Most of the information taught in college can be found on the Internet, but the point of college other than learning is to shape students into successful employees and bosses. The college experience is centered around future prosperity and in order to be successful, students have to work hard. Sitting through class and getting C’s is all well and good if a student’s desired outcome is a piece of paper after four years. The general feeling of entitlement shared by the majority of the millennial generation is perfectly encapsulated in the argument for a money back guarantee and it must be stopped.
    College tuition is on the rise because of the societal pressure to get a piece of paper saying you are qualified to work in a professional setting. The law of supply and demand dictates that with an increase in demand, prices also rise. The law of supply and demand has no place for entitlement. It is unfortunate that the world we live in insists on coddling the youth. The professional world is often quite cut throat and the “participation trophy” society that we live in sets people up for disaster. The fear of failure is a very powerful thing and it should serve as motivation for students, college students especially because of the financial responsibility they assume. College students are convinced that getting a degree ensures job placement and high salaries, but there is more to it than just going to class.
    College is a powerful tool and a wonderful place to find oneself and plan the future. Apart from soul searching and hopeful fantasies of grandeur, college is a place to hone one’s skills. There are many resume building opportunities and networking events designed to give students a leg up when it comes time to find a job. With the power of the Internet, there are many different avenues to seek education to supplement assigned coursework. Modern students have the ability do develop diverse sets of skills to differentiate themselves when it comes time to apply for a job or an internship. It is crucial to remember that the job market is highly competitive and a boring resume and a basic college degree just aren’t good enough anymore.
    As a whole, the college experience is not that different from all of the other life experiences in the sense that it will become what you make of it. Passive learning wont bring great happiness and wealth to anyone because the job market is far too competitive for boring candidates. College is a tool, all be it an expensive one, but it must be respected and treated as such. Proposing a failsafe in the form of a money back guarantee teaches college grads that it is okay to depend on others for their wellbeing (communism in a nutshell). Promoting such an unrealistic expectation does college students a serious disservice that will only lead to disappointment.

  27. Amanda Skalski May 29, 2017 at 7:59 pm #

    The content of this article really expresses what the need of college is. College is for higher education than a high school degree which you can not do much with in today’s world. Personally when I was choosing a subject that I wanted to study in college I immediately went to a business degree. I had chosen accounting because it has a degree that is very high in demand and likely I do enjoy studying it. I believe a lot of students do not go to college for the degree that they want anymore due to the fact that college is very expensive and some degree do not pay out in the end of the college degree. The fact that some colleges are starting a money back guarantee is great due to the fact that some students will take out loans of thousands on a career that will lead them no where than they have no way to pay the loan back. I also agree with the article stating that college is a risky process. Just finding the money to go alone is hard, I’ve had my fair share of scares right before the start of a semester with getting my loans in order to attend college.
    I do believe that businesses are complaining that students are not ready to work in the work force after college. When I did my first internship I was only a second semester Sophomore and I could not believe how different real accounting work was compared to what we did in college. In college they teach you the core of what you will doing, all the meanings behind the terms and why you do them. Doing internships is the real experience of what you need to be ready for the workforce after college. Internships put everything in a real life world for college students where you see the real work that is being done compared to what college shows you. Being in an accredited college for business does makes a different with the work you see in college. They bring in a lot of real work situations which is something you may not see in class work.

  28. Lauren MacArthur June 10, 2017 at 9:35 pm #

    If recruiters currently believe that only “11 percent of business leaders” are prepared to adequately tackle the working environment. Then perhaps colleges and universities working closer with employers will lead to better equipped individuals for their field of expertise. Drexel University’s co-operative program requires students attend full-time classes their freshman year and then subsequent years alternate their period of study with full-time employment. If students are able to excel in their classes while gaining knowledge in their field of choice in the workplace then this can be a great opportunity. Gaining workforce experience, will not only help individuals in co-operative programs gain credits towards their degree, it will also give them first-hand experience to the future they are seeking to engage in. Essentially students who participate in programs like the co-operative program that Drexel offers, upon the completion of their education will walk away with knowledge of the working environment. Some individuals will choose to continue down that career path or choose a different one, either way they will still have gained knowledge that they can then carry along into their future endeavors. Another thing to take into consideration would be colleges and universities working together with employers on course selection to ensure that individuals are on the right track from the beginning, starting their freshman year of college. It is important that students who amongst knowing what career path they want to enter seek courses that will be most beneficial to them.

    While accreditation does not guarantee that every individual who goes into the workforce after graduating will become successful individuals, it does provide assurance that those individuals received an education by professors who are exceptional in their field. Perspective employers will see on an individual’s resume that they have received a degree from an accredited college or university and they will hold merit amongst that individual. I do find the proposal under the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to be interesting though and think that alternatives to accredited institutions for the sake of federal student aid could if implemented correctly be beneficial. Under the proposal the recommendation suggests that there be a separate system in which implements private financial aid to individuals who need it.

    With the cost value of education skyrocketing over the past decade, individuals do not want to land in student debt and have a degree that will not guarantee them a career. It defeats the purpose of spending thousands of dollars and gaining knowledge that will land an individual a job that will not provide for a brighter future for themselves. With the assurance of the money back guarantee individuals will be more inclined to attend a college or university. Though the money back guarantee may be in the early stages I believe that this will be something many individuals will find appealing. If implemented correctly it will also have benefits to the colleges and universities themselves, as individuals who succeed in the workplace reflect positively on the institution those individuals have received their degrees from.

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