Why Not Even Exercise Will Undo The Harm Of Sitting All Day—And What You Can Do About It

from Quartz

A large review recently published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute confirms what we’ve been hearing for years: Sitting can be fatal.

It’s been linked to cancerdiabetes, and cardiovascular disease. In this latest meta-analysis, Daniela Schmid and Michael F. Leitzmann of the University of Regensburg in Germany analyzed 43 observational studies, amounting to more than 4 million people’s answers to questions about their sitting behavior and cancer incidences. The researchers examined close to 70,000 cancer cases and found that sitting is associated with a 24% increased risk of colon cancer, a 32% increased risk of endometrial cancer, and a 21% increased risk of lung cancer.

The really bad news: You can’t exercise away the habit’s harmful effects. “Adjustment for physical activity did not affect the positive association between sedentary behavior and cancer,” the authors write. Even participants who achieved the daily recommended levels of physical activity were at the same risk as those who spent their day sitting. “[The results] indicate that the increased risk of cancer seen in individuals with prolonged time spent sedentary is not explained by the mere absence of physical activity in those persons,” the researchers say.

More here.

19 Responses to Why Not Even Exercise Will Undo The Harm Of Sitting All Day—And What You Can Do About It

  1. JL November 12, 2014 at 7:37 pm #

    This article discusses the adverse effects of sitting for extended periods of time. I do believe that the people of this country sit for much more time than is recommended but it is a difficult thing to counteract. From a young age, schools would have students sit in class for an hour or two before a more active lesson is introduced. This only gets worse as students age. Most colleges have an hour to hour and a half class periods and offices could have their employees sit for hours at a time.
    The treadmill desks intrigue me as something businesses who exert a greater sense of employee responsibility will implement. I do not see most businesses trying tread-desks as a company wide plan would be quite expensive. Businesses can motivate their employees to remain active in other ways. I have a friend who works in a loan department of a major bank. In order to have a reduced cost to his health insurance contributions, he is required to wear a pedometer and take a specified number of steps during the working day. I believe this is an inexpensive way for most businesses to attempt to keep their workforce healthy.

  2. Jessica Crowell-Graff November 13, 2014 at 5:52 pm #

    Gym Life is a Happy Life

    I found this article to be a bit disappointing. I was hoping that the article would provide new or innovate recommendations and alternatives to avoid the harms sitting for long periods of time. However, the article pretty much simply recommends standing more often—to me, the most obvious solution.

    I do think that the information in the article is important for scientific reasons and medical understanding; however I feel like the audience is everyone and no one at the same time. I feel that the people who are experiencing the harmful effects of leading largely sedentary lives are aware of their inactivity. Likewise, I think that everyone should be aware that there are scientifically proven consequences for sitting for long periods of time.

    In my own personal experience, I noticed my health, behavior and mood change differ when I began my desk job. Previously having been a waitress, a desk job drastically decreased the amount of activity I experienced each day. As a waitress I was standing and moving from clock-in to clock-out, which came out to around thirty-five hours a week. As an intern at a desk, I would clock about twenty-eight hours a week in time spent sitting down, and even worse, with my legs crossed. Keeping in mind that my diet was basically consistent in the transition between jobs, and there were no other life changes that would influence my mood, I began to notice the adverse effects of a sedentary lifestyle.

    A few weeks in, I began to feel more sluggish and tired at all parts of the day. I felt bloated and even gained weight. My mind was not as sharp and it took me longer to complete tasks. I would even walk around the office slower, when I did walk. In an effort to feel healthier and lose weight, I joined a gym and hired a personal trainer. After a few more weeks, and eight hours a week at the gym, I began to feel like my old self. I had a more positive attitude and I felt as if the energy poured out of me when I was working.

    At school, I notice the same effects as a result of my course load. When I have a lot of assignments due one week, and do not have time to go to the gym, I feel mentally and physically exhausted, even if all I’ve done is sit and take notes. However, a few days after getting back into the “gym flow,” or going to the gym consistently, I begin to feel more energized and healthier.

    I recommend that people with sedentary jobs or lifestyles create a list to describe their personalities and physical feelings they experience throughout the day. Many of these attributes may be a direct result of that sedentary lifestyle. In order to create a happier life or more positive outlook, try going for walks or finding an activity that induces sweat. Once you find that activity, keep at it each day. I can almost guarantee that after a week or two of consistent movement, there will be positive mental, emotional and physical results.

  3. Paul Link November 13, 2014 at 9:01 pm #

    The article “Why not even exercise will undo that harm of sitting all day – and what you can do about it”, is an interesting piece on the serious health effects of a sedentary lifestyle. While the article does provide some important information when it comes sitting for prolonged periods of time, the article itself is very misleading. The author suggests that the effect of a sedentary life in regards to cancer can’t be fixed with increased physical activity, but then the author suggests just to do exactly that. I believe what the author was trying to say was that the damage of prolonged sitting in relation to cancer and other cardiovascular diseases has already been dealt, although increasing activity can prevent future damages and create a healthier life. While the article seemed to be quite confusing, at least for myself, it did provide some interesting studies regarding sitting that I would not have thought of, such as that inactivity causes a decrease in chemicals that remove bad fats. The article states that, “A widely studied casualty of this blackout is lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme that Hamilton likens to “a vacuum cleaner for fats in the blood stream.” When Hamilton forced rats to remain inactive for 24 hours, their lipoprotein lipase activity became virtually nonexistent (a 90%-95% reduction)” (Newman). While I knew that a sedentary lifestyle was not good for oneself, it is interesting to see the exact details of how the body reacts to such an environment.

    As someone who has been a Physical Therapy Aide for three years, I have firsthand experience of the consequences of prolonged sitting and a sedentary lifestyle. On top of what the article stated as some of the links between prolonged sitting and cancer/cardio vascular disease, sitting as a rule of thumb is hard on one’s body. For many individuals, proper posture and ergonomic workspaces are extremely lacking and due to this it creates strain on the body. The one therapists I use to work alongside described this as micro traumas. She essentially described to patients that the strain we put on ourselves day-to-day through improper posture and prolonged sitting, eventually will lead to or become equivalent of a real trauma. This straining causes fatigue which then can lead those who do not correct the issue into a slippery slope into unhealthy lifestyle patterns. As Jessica said in a previous comment, it is extremely important to maintain an active lifestyle. While it may not exactly be best to “find an activity that induces sweat”, she and I share the same notion that being more active and having the mentality in bettering oneself can lead to a healthier, more satisfied lifestyle.

    Works Cited:

    Newman, Hannah. “Why Not Even Exercise Will Undo the Harm of Sitting All Day-and What You Can Do about It.” Quartz. 26 June 2014. Web. 13 Nov. 2014. .

  4. Rachel Altman April 10, 2015 at 10:18 am #

    The statistics to this blog are astounding. The whole time while reading this I literally kept thinking to myself, “I’m sitting right now, I sit all day at school and at work.” Apparently, 70,000 cases of cancer found thats sitting is associated with 24% cases of colon cancer. This specific statistic caught me off guard because one of my sorority sisters father was just diagnosed with colon cancer and it is really scary to think that the daily act of sitting could have something to do with it.

    The article just keeps getting worse though! No matter how much of an active person you are, if you’re sitting for the majority of the work day chances are you can’t exercise you’re way out of it. This means that there is a slight chance, at this very moment, I’m developing colon cancer, endometrial cancer or even lung cancer.

    So if all of this is true, why is it that for the majority of office culture there are sitting desks instead of standing ones? Or why isn’t it apart of our work day to go do a lap around the office or a ten minute break within each hour to make sure that your stretching your legs, expanding your lungs and moving your body? More companies and work people need to research on this.

    I know that some companies, like the Huffington Post, has implemented standing work desks for their staff. This is a great idea over getting cancer, don’t you think? What’s the point of going to work and making all this money if all of your paycheck might end up in a doctors hand.

    After reading this I personally feel that this should be made more of a big deal. I knew sitting all day wasn’t the best for you, but I had no idea what the potential risks really are. It’s scary! Something that seems so harmless could end up deadly. Active muscles and promoting awareness are key to solving this issue. I know next time I’m at work or in class I will be getting up at least once or twice to keep my body active and healthy.

  5. Andres Arcila April 26, 2015 at 12:59 pm #

    In this article readers can see about illnesses that have been a big issue for humanity because the cure of them are not found by Science. Many researches demonstrate that exercising is healthy for your mind, soul and body as a physical object. But those who are used to eat healthy and go to the GYM are not away from theses illnesses so it generates a lack of sense because of going to the gym is supposed to be healthy why people that do not go to the gym and develop a more sedentary life have the same risk than “healthy” people?
    In my personal opinion exercising your body is important and make you feel better, your humor is going to be better you will feel happier, you can distract your mind from the stress of the daily life and it definitely should affect positively your health.

  6. Ariana G. October 16, 2015 at 2:24 pm #

    Reading this article reinforced talk from my peers about how sitting for long periods of time can have serious effects on your health. The research mentioned in this article was extremely interesting and educational. Especially because as a college student, we spend the majority of our day sitting through lectures and sitting at a desk after class studying and doing homework. However, I find that I study better if I am walking around, even if it is only pacing back and forth in my dorm. Moving back and forth helps me focus and reading this article will definitely cause me to continue my habits of walking about when I am doing my studying, but also to make sure I get up once and while when I find myself to be sitting for too long, and to encourage my peers to do the same.

    Being a collegiate Cross Country runner, I do get a good deal of exercise and this article definitely intrigued me. Especially the mention of a treadmill desk, which could potentially be dangerous for some of us that are not that coordinated, but whenever it isn’t safe to run outside for practice, my teammates and I will be forced to run on the treadmill. I always bring along study materials with me to the gym in these scenarios because no one wants to stare at nothing for an entire hour, it can be pretty tiresome. So the mention of the combination of a treadmill and desk made me think about my sixty minute runs and how luxurious it would be to have a nice desk to prop my laptop on to read an e-book instead of getting my physical textbook all sweaty.

  7. Justina Baskin February 14, 2016 at 10:37 pm #

    In todays society, our life styles have become reliable on distractions that make lack of movement occur. For example, since television has existed it has become a form of distraction as well as, entertainment and makes playing outside or doing any form of physical activity difficult. After reading this article, it is scary to know that possible cancers and diabetes are linked to lack of movement. Back in the day, this term of lacking movement wasn’t something that was of concern since our technology wasn’t as savvy as it is today. As beneficial as technology is, as well as how it is degrading our society. As the article discusses in depth about the issues with the lack of movement, it suggests new technology to use while at work which is a workable treadmill. Since cubicle jobs have increased tremendously, this is how lack of movement mainly occurs, and since we also have the technology mind as well put it to good use. Hopefully more companies will be more accepting of using these in the offices!

  8. Bree Havel March 29, 2016 at 12:22 pm #

    The research provided by the article was information I was not previously aware of. Yes, it is common knowledge that being inactive can cause serious health defects however, I did not realize the extent to this. It has only been about a year and a half since I began exercising. My own routines consists of going to the gym 3-4 times a week preforming 40 minutes of weight lifting followed by 20 minutes of cardio, normally running. Since I have been told exercising and a healthy diet is all I need, I would have never guessed that my attempt at exercising would not be enough to compensate for the amount of time I sit down daily. I sit for hours a day at school or work, I sit down when it’s time to eat, and I sit down when I watch television or movies. Briefly thinking about my daily routines I am just now realizing how much time a day I spend sitting. It is a known fact that obesity is a huge problem in the United States. As of 2015 the stateofobesity.org claims every single state has an adult obesity rate above 20%. Arkansas, being the highest, has a rate of 35.9% while Colorado, who has the lowest, is at an estimated 21.3%. These statistics are only showing adult obesity as well, childhood obesity was not even provided in these facts. The fact that most people spend their days sitting down is a reason for this obesity issue. However, if this article is true then why are the majority of jobs “desk jobs?” Why do schools encourage you to sit for an hour and a half straight for one college class? No one is attempting to change this norm. The solutions provided in this article are somewhat disappointing. The article states one should create “standing desks” or have a treadmill under their desk at work. This is not a possibility for some people. Even when the author states one should move around for 1 minute and 40 seconds every hour for a nine hour period, with jobs and school this isn’t always a possibility. Better solutions need to be found and more people need to be aware because like myself before reading this article, many people see exercise as enough.

    Work Cited: “Obesity Rates & Trends: The State Of Obesity”. Stateofobesity.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 29 Mar. 2016.

  9. Wendy Chen April 1, 2016 at 8:36 pm #

    I normally do not mind the commute to places and sometimes I even enjoy the commute. However, a lot of this depends on various factors such as where I am going, whether I am going to or coming from the place, how long the commute takes, what kind of transportation I am commuting on, and even what the weather is like outside. Many of these factors are considered because I have motion sickness. I used to hate commutes in general because I would get really sick on any type of closed off transportation because there’s a closed-in smell of transportation that makes me feel nauseous. My motion sickness has gotten a lot better because I had to take the school bus for four years in high school and now, half an hour to Seton Hall every day. However, even though I’m a lot better with commutes now, how much I enjoy a commute will depend on a lot factors. It is obvious that if I am going somewhere fun, I will want to commute less and be there more whereas if I were to be going somewhere that I didn’t want to be, I would hope for the commute to take as long as it needs. The same goes for if I am going somewhere, I may be more excited and wish for the commute to be shorter, thus enjoying the commute less whereas if I was coming from a place, I may be winding down and enjoy the commute more because I generally find commutes to be relaxing. The length of the commute also runs in sync with the destination of the commute where I don’t always mind long commutes because I tend to fall asleep easily. It also matters what kind of commuting I am doing such as walking in the city being my favorite. If I were to bus, it is less likely that I can roll down the windows and have the wind blowing across my face whereas in a car, I can roll down the windows, unless I am driving with my mom, and feel the wind. As for the weather, I enjoy commutes more in warmer weather because everything feels lighter.
    The article talks about commuting being destructive to a person because it takes away from time. There were many factors considered such as some of mine above which I think will always affect how much someone enjoys the commute. I like to think about things while there is movement going about me; however, the article says that commuting can be inefficient to a person’s performance and well-being depending on what they do during the commute. People with higher levels of self-control can make more out of their commute such as thinking about their day to garner more satisfaction or using the time to think of work ideas to spark more productivity. I think a person will enjoy commuting either more or less by the things that the do while commuting too such as if the person doesn’t do anything during their commutes, they may feel bored and frustrated at how long the commute is taking because it is a waste of their time. However, many people may like commuting because it gives them time off to themselves to think about a few things or reflect on certain things. It is always what you make out of something and in general, I enjoy commutes, but that’s also probably because I haven’t experienced road rage yet.

  10. Cayla Andican March 27, 2017 at 9:31 pm #

    I found this article very interesting, I knew sitting all day was not beneficial but I never knew the harmful effect that it could have. In an article, written by Hannah Newman, she linked sitting to a fatal problem that can increase the chances of developing cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Most office jobs require their workers to sit at a desk all day; one would not expect how harmful the effects of sitting all day could actually be. Sitting for long periods of time can slow down the metabolism making it harder for the body to regulate blood sugar and break down body fat. It also leads to your large support muscles being inactive, resulting in over a seventy-five percent drop in the ability of muscles to remove noxious fats from the blood stream and decreases good cholesterol.
    Our bodies are designed for movement, so sitting for long periods at a time can be very harmful to our health. The average person spends on average nine to ten hours a day sitting. Working out cannot counter the effects that sitting all day can have. However, studies have shown that having short breaks, where you can stand up and walk around, has beneficial effects. It is very important for people to stay active to stay in shape, but it is hard to stay in shape when students are sitting at a desk for hours at a time or workers are sitting in a cube all day.
    With the reliance on technology our society has in this decade, people are more likely to be seated longer at a computer than they would have years ago. People are too obsessed with technology to go outside and engage in physical activity, they would rather keep up on the latest news and see what their friends are doing. When I was growing up, I would go run around outside and play games with my friends. This little bit of physical activity was very beneficial to my health without me even realizing it. Today, kids spend their time watching television or sitting on the computer after school. Children in this century are getting into a bad habit that they might not realize is not beneficial to their health.
    An article by Life Hacker suggests that instead of watching through the same commercials over and over again, to get up and walk around until the show you were watching comes back on. I think this is a good idea for people who like to spend their weekends or days off sitting on the couch watching television. Although one day of sitting might not seem to do much, getting in the habit of being lazy and lack of exercise can be very harmful to your body and your health over time.

  11. Taylor Salomon March 30, 2017 at 9:32 am #

    As a college student, my day consists of sitting in class or the library for over eight hours. Sometimes I think my time should not involve sitting all day and staring at a computer screen. I love being active such as going to the gym. During fall semester, I would go to the gym 4-5 days of the week. I go to keep fit and remain a healthy lifestyle.
    This article explores the negativity of sitting and exercise cannot undo that harm. According to The Journal of National Cancer Institute, sitting can be fatal. It has been linked to cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. In Germany, the University of Regensburg analyzed 43 observational studies reporting sitting is associated with a 24% increased risk of colon cancer, a 32% increased risk of endometrial cancer, and a 21% increased risk of lung cancer.
    The concerning issue is you can’t exercise away the habit’s harmful effects. According to Newman, adjustment for physical activity did not affect the positive association between sedentary behavior and cancer. A shocking statistic is participants that exercise on a daily basis are at the same risk as those who sit. The author goes on to explain two reasons why. First is sitting plus weight gain equals elevated risk. Another surprising statistic is you only burn about a calorie a minute sitting. Although I never knew this fact, I am still shocked that sitting burns calories. I thought physical activity sparked calorie burning. Along with sitting, other risk factors for chronic diseases come from being overweight or obese. Obesity promotes insulin resistance and bodily inflammation- two things that increase the risk of cancer for audiences above the average body weight. Second involves sitting plus inactive muscles, which leads to harmful biological signaling. When you sit, your large postural support muscles aren’t doing anything, therefore producing a suite of beneficial molecules. According to Marc Hamilton, skeletal muscles have an electrical activity in them when they’re working which is like the light switch that turns on all these healthy things in the muscles. Ultimately, when you sit, you turn these light switches off.
    Marc Hamilton is director of the Inactivity Physiology Program and creates an analogy for this fiasco. He states “sitting is the new smoking- even for runners.” The ending is very disturbing. If active individuals are at risk, then is there a solution to this madness. I do not want to be at risk of cancer because I sit in a classroom or library. Luckily, studies found short breaks of movement has beneficial effects. This means standing or walking slowly will interrupt your sitting time. Student Bree Havel chimes in on this issue’s solution. She states, “The solutions provided in this article are somewhat disappointing. The article states one should create “standing desks” or have a treadmill under their desk at work. This is not a possibility for some people. Even when the author states one should move around for 1 minute and 40 seconds every hour for a nine hour period, with jobs and school this isn’t always a possibility. Better solutions need to be found and more people need to be aware because like myself before reading this article, many people see exercise as enough.” Frankly, I agree with her. After I spend several hours in the library, I occasionally get up and walk around to refresh my brain and stay awake. The real question is how many times do I have to get up and walk around just so I do not increase my risk of cancer? In the article, it reports those who took more breaks from sitting had narrower waists as well as lower body mass index, triglycerides, and glucose tolerance. Do you want ot know the length of their breaks? Well, it is a whooping four and half minutes. Just like student Bree Havel states, there needs to be a better solution to this ongoing dilemma.

  12. Doris Motta November 4, 2017 at 10:52 pm #

    Cardiovascular disease is at an all-time high for our country. Our risks for heart disease, diabetes and cancer have increased drastically over the years. Interestingly, sitting increases those risks for us. I didn’t realize that exercising would not lower our chances for obesity related diseases. I really like the idea of a treadmill already being implemented at some companies. Taking a break while sitting all day and walking for a short period is very beneficial to our health. It is also nice to just get up for a bit and step away from the routing of sitting all day for work.

    I think it is very crucial for our country to take necessary steps and implement necessary programs to lower our risks for cardiovascular diseases. We are already at a one out of three ratio for cancer. The more we do to lessen those risks, the higher the probability of being able to live a longer and healthier life. However, I wouldn’t take it to the extreme of eliminating sitting completely like Dan Kois. There are other more realistic ways of reducing our sitting time.

  13. Rose Hyppolite November 7, 2018 at 8:12 pm #

    Prior to reading the article, I was aware that we have been using the toilet the wrong way. In a sitting position, we are placing our abdomen at a 90 degree angle which pinches our anal canal. The posture in which we position our colon may lead to crohn disease or colon cancer. Although I was aware of this, it never came across my mind that sitting in general could also be affecting our health. I think it is safe to say that we have spent most of our lives sitting. From a young age at school, through secondary school and college, we spend most of our times sitting at a desk. As adults, many have office jobs that requires them to work 8 to more hours a day which also requires to spend time sitting in from of a computer.

    I think people are now realizing the effect that sitting has on our body. Beside the potential health issues, such as colon cancer, it can also cause weight gain and slouching in our posture. To avoid this, I am beginning to see a difference in workplace. For example, I have seen many professors with the standing up desk, which I think is very affective for the posture. When I saw the picture in the article of the man on the treadmill, I did not think it was practical to work while being on an exercising machine, to me it would be very distracting. However, after reading the article, I think it is very efficient to take breaks in between and using the machine would be helpful. I also find it interesting that, even if you sit all day, just standing up and taking a short walk could make a difference. After years of sitting, I did not think that a simple interruption would make a big difference.

    Unlike Jessica, I am not disappointed in the article. I think it is clear that the author is mostly targeting working professionals or people who spend hours sitting. I think the article does provide recommendations and alternative to avoid harming ourselves from sitting. Although some may not be practical, such as biking for our commute, but some such as taking longer breaks are pretty helpful.

    Work cited

    Lametti Daniel “Don’t just Sit There!”, August 26, 2010, https://slate.com/technology/2010/08/how-bathroom-posture-affects-your-health.html. Accessed November 7, 2018.

    Mutz Phil “The Incredible Way Squatting On The Toilet Can Improve Your Health”, https://www.littlethings.com/right-way-to-use-the-bathroom-squatting. Accessed November 7, 2018.

  14. Rose Hyppolite November 7, 2018 at 8:15 pm #

    Prior to reading the article, I was aware that we have been using the toilet the wrong way. In a sitting position, we are placing our abdomen at a 90 degree angle which pinches our anal canal. The posture in which we position our colon may lead to crohn disease or colon cancer. Although I was aware of this, it never came across my mind that sitting in general could also be affecting our health. I think it is safe to say that we have spent most of our lives sitting. From a young age at school, through secondary school and college, we spend most of our times sitting at a desk. As adults, many have office jobs that requires them to work 8 to more hours a day which also requires to spend time sitting in from of a computer.

    I think people are now realizing the effect that sitting has on our body. Beside the potential health issues, such as colon cancer, it can also cause weight gain and slouching in our posture. To avoid this, I am beginning to see a difference in workplace. For example, I have seen many professors with the standing up desk, which I think is very affective for the posture. When I saw the picture in the article of the man on the treadmill, I did not think it was practical to work while being on an exercising machine, to me it would be very distracting. However, after reading the article, I think it is very efficient to take breaks in between and using the machine would be helpful. I also find it interesting that, even if you sit all day, just standing up and taking a short walk could make a difference. After years of sitting, I did not think that a simple interruption would make a big difference.

    Unlike Jessica, I am not disappointed in the article. I think it is clear that the author is mostly targeting working professionals or people who spend hours sitting. I think the article does provide recommendations and alternative to avoid harming ourselves from sitting. Although some may not be practical, such as biking for our commute, but some such as taking longer breaks are pretty helpful.

    Work cited
    Lametti Daniel “Don’t just Sit There!”, August 26, 2010, https://slate.com/technology/2010/08/how-bathroom-posture-affects-your-health.html. Accessed November 7, 2018.

    Mutz Phil “The Incredible Way Squatting On The Toilet Can Improve Your Health”, https://www.littlethings.com/right-way-to-use-the-bathroom-squatting. Accessed November 7, 2018.

  15. Justin T November 8, 2018 at 10:25 am #

    “The researchers examined close to 70,000 cancer cases and found that sitting is associated with a 24% increased risk of colon cancer, a 32% increased risk of endometrial cancer, and a 21% increased risk of lung cancer.” If this sentence right here doesn’t open your eyes to the truly harmful risks of sitting all day then there must be something wrong with you. We are not talking about a 2% higher risk or even 10% higher risk, in some cases we are talking about over 30% of a higher risk of cancer from sitting at our desks all day. This past summer I worked an internship in a corporate office and I did absolutely everything I could to not be sitting at my desks all day, because I knew the harmful effects. The good thing though is that over the past 10 years or so I feel that health and science have evolved to undercover stuff like this, and more companies are taking initiatives to make sure workers are not sitting all day, whether it be standing desks, or taking small walks throughout the day.

    Even with the mind-blowing statistics that were presented in the article, the idea that with good exercise the affects of sitting at your desk all day will be still be there. Everyone preaches to eat right and exercise daily but it amazes me that you can put in serious work in the gym and still reap the negative effects of sitting all day. I think that’s why this article is so important because it really opens the eyes to a lot of reader that, look if you’re going to sit all day every day for many years of work you’re putting yourself at a high risk of hurting your health.

  16. Elyse N Cuttic November 9, 2018 at 6:58 pm #

    This article has a very interesting title which made me read it. As a very active person I thought there was no way this could be true so I decided to see for myself. This article confirms the harmful effects of sitting which can cause cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. I keep replaying in my head how many times I have sat for a long period of time. After reading this article I will be sure not to sit for a long time. It also mentions that people who get the right amount of physical activity did not have a decrease in their risk of getting cancer. Personally, I find this statement interesting. As a collegiate athlete I would assume being very active it must do some good to your health, but it does nothing to help decrease your risk of cancer.
    One other interesting point in this article is when they talk about the connection between sitting, inactive muscles, and it being biologically harmful. Muscles in your legs become inactive in a sense, harming your health because they are not being used. When sitting, genes are suppressed and it can affect your blood flow and increase blood clotting. It says the biggest way to help decrease this is by taking more breaks to get up and walk around. As a college student we are always in class or studying so we spend a great deal sitting. I know for me it always helps wake me up when I get up to stand or walk around when studying. Hopefully I can incorporate this practice into more aspects of my life.

  17. Monique Edward November 9, 2018 at 9:31 pm #

    It is evident that cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes are associated with a lack of exercise and healthy eating. Even though a person has diabetes in his or her family, physical exercise plays a larger role than genetics (Colberg). On the other hand, even though cancer can arise from “bad luck,” inactivity significantly increases the risk of colon, endometrial, and lung cancer (Scientific American). Although it is established that physical exercise is essential, it is unfortunate that it is not enough when humans spend most of their day sitting at school, work, and at one’s leisure. I am guilty of sitting down all day in front of my laptop when I have several assignments to complete. In reality, I should find time to incorporate exercise into even my busy days because my physical health is more important than a few assignments. Many companies and schools encourage people to stay active by dedicating days of physical activities. For example, my high school sacrificed a day of learning each year so that every student can spend the day outside of the classroom to catch lionfish, assist at the animal care shelter, and volunteer at the senior center. Therefore, encouraging students to do more physical activities reminds a consumer that sitting down every day is not healthy.

    Reducing our sitting time is crucial for lowering our health risks instead of doing the recommended daily activity. Every corporation, school, and meeting should spend half of the day standing or moving around in some way. For example, companies could have computers that can be adjusted (raised and lowered) so that employees can stand in front of the computer while finishing a task. This slight adjustment does not prevent employees from completing assignments effectively and efficiently. At club meetings, executive board meetings, or professional gathering, the attendees usually sit in a semi-circle, a roundtable, or in rows. Incorporating stretching, standing, and walking around during can reduce one’s sitting time.

    Colberg, Sheri. “Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association.” Diabetes Care, https: //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2992225/

    “Most Cancer Cases Arises From ‘Bad Luck’.” Scientific American, https: //www.scientificamerican.com/article/most-cancer-cases-arise-from-bad-luck/

  18. Joe Russulle June 13, 2019 at 11:31 pm #

    Exercising is known to be beneficial for humans towards increasing health and decreasing the risks of certain diseases including cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, and many others. Moreover, this article reveals that increased amounts of sitting without proper breaks in between have been linked to cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Although this article contains relevant scientific background to the process and effects of sitting, it does not offer detailed information on how to prevent the harmful effects of sitting for a long time. Nonetheless, it suggests that taking breaks during long periods of sitting could be beneficial towards reducing the risks. Testimonials from individuals who consistently exercise admit that lack of exercise certainly affects one’s lifestyle.

    Personally, I have always been someone who exercises, especially as a high school student. However, after going to college and obtaining a part-time job as an alternate administrator, it became apparent that consistent exercise was not apart of my daily routine. Moreover, this began to affect my physical appearance as I began to put on more weight and could not perform some of the activities I previously could as a soccer, track and field athlete. At my administrative job, most of my day consists of sitting behind a desk at a computer. Additionally, I began to notice how tired and sluggish I would feel. In fact, I soon realized that sitting all day, made me yawn and tired more often. Also, I began to lose focus while completing various tasks and would be more lethargic when moving around the office. As soon as I began to recognize these changes, I quickly enrolled in a nearby gym and began taking breaks in between my lengthy office hours. These changes proved to be beneficial, as I lost a few pounds and began to develop a positive mindset towards everything else including my work tasks. In fact, my energy towards everything changed and became more positive.

    I agree that sitting all day involves its consequences. Moreover, I agree with the idea from the article indicating “Why Not Even Exercise Will Undo The Harm Of Sitting All Day—And What You Can Do About It.” This goes to say that although exercise may be beneficial and helpful towards reducing the risks of certain diseases, it may not reverse the inevitable effects that may be obtained through long periods of sitting. An article by Reynolds Gretchen reveals that “fortunately for those who are deskbound, exercise scientists conclude that any movement, no matter how slight, counts as physical activity and can be consequential.” In fact, researchers found that moving and fidgeting in chairs, also known as “dynamic sitting”, burns calories. It is known that sitting for hours slows blood flow through major arteries and affects the health and function of such blood vessels which could potentially contribute overtime to arterial stiffening and increased blood pressure. Nonetheless, research has proven that fidgeting, even a little is helpful. Specifically, a study revealed that blood flow measured from a healthy group of volunteers proved to be lower in the unmoving leg compared to the other “moving” leg whereby blood flow had risen due to the volunteers simply tapping their feet.

    Overall, sitting all day long is not recommended. However, if it must be done then even the slightest bit of exercise is beneficial towards decreasing the risk of disease-related incidents to prolonged sitting including dynamic sitting, tapping your toes, or wiggling in some way.

  19. Joe Russulle June 13, 2019 at 11:38 pm #

    Reynolds Gretchen. “Does Fidgeting Counter the Harmful Effects of Sitting?” The New York TImes. July 20, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/20/well/fidgeting-health-sitting-sedentary-standing.html

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